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Full text of "Australian Home Journal"

A/Q 

052 
AUS 



DOES EASTER MEAN ANYTHINr 
A, U S T R A L 



1OMEJOU&V 



Patterns 



Enclosed 











The following issue(s) is/are missing and 
unobtainable 



9041 






Date of collating 



tIL 1st, 
1949 



DOES EASTER MEAN ANYTHINC 



U 



T 



1OMEJOU- 




Patterns 



Enclosed 








f**^& /9*H- 



% 




Registered at 
the 6. P.O., 
Sydney, for 
transmission 
by post as a 
Newspaper. 





Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



COLORADO (U.S.A.) FELT A PAIN 
AND SAW A DOCTOR. H EX- 
M/SSWG TO0TH 
HEX THUMB. CHECK sAJ 



RCGVLAK 

BKUSH/NGS. KOIYWS 8UB81& 
ZEMOVE 



ABOR/GINALS 

THE TWNGlLLf 

TRIBE 6URIEO 
THEIR DISLODGED 



MOUTH. WH/TE/V 
YOUR TEETH. 



TEETH NEAR 
A LAGOON 
TO MAKE 
LILIES . 
GROW/ 



KOLYNQS SAY&S 
YOU MO/VY TW/C 
A PAY. GOES 
AS 

TOOTHPASTE BECAUSE 
HALF AA/ WCH O/V 
A 
/S 






Stop it faster with ANACIN! Aiiacin contains 

an extra ingredient. It is a prescription for 

pain and aches. 




Tr.,dp M,.rk 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



Collars and Necklines. 
Both high and low necklines are the 
fashion at the moment, but they must be 
distinctive. Not the plain timorous "V" 
or the conservative high. Wide necklines 
are a great favourite for day as well as 
evening. 




Sketched are a few ideas: A: The new 
large collar which is becoming very 
popular. B: The deep, wide neckline and 
collar. C: The utterly demure choir boy 
type with gold bow. D: The draped neck 
line. E: The wide, oval neckline; and F, 
the very popular "U" shape. 

To make a neckline "different" will give 
added smartness to your frock. 



Important Sleeres. 

Sleeves and shoulders are very import 
ant to the success of your frock. Long r 
short, they must be new-looking. Here 
we show a variety. The short cup sleeve; 
the below elbow with a cuff; the long, full 
Gibson girl sleeve with the latest idea an 
elastic garter of velvet ribbon with bow, 
worn just above the elbow. 




Then the large dolman armhole and the 
threequarter sleeve gathered up into folds 
at end; then the gracious Lady Winder- 
mere style with wide lace edge. Sleeves 
really catch the eye on any frock. 

Another demure style is the long bell 
sleeve with narrow cuff and wide lace 
edge falling over hands a lvely style for 
wedding gown. 



Wipe a little oil or vaseline over silver 
and other bright metal ornaments before 
putting them away while you go on holi 
day. Then you will not find them tarn- 
ish-ed on your return. 





K-:oXxvK. ;:-..........,.-..;. .....,..: .. . . ... 

The modern woman, living as she does an *almost 
non-stop existence, demands TRUE relief whenever 
pain comes. She must have a pain reliever which 
not only acts quickly but does not have after-effects 
which prevent her from going about things as usual 
after - effects such as dizziness, depression or 
"slowing-up"; or sometimes harm to the system. 

That is why Aspro has a special appeal for women, not only 
in Australia, but all over the world. Aspro . free from harmful 
drugs, leaves you fresh and fit again after the pain has gone. 



THE PURITY OF ASPRO 

The purity of Aspro conforms to the 
standard laid down by the British 
Pharmacopoeia a guiding authority 
of the Medical Profession. 



ASPRO 

NO DEPRESSING AFTER-EFFECTS 

NO "SLOWING-UP" 

NO HAZINESS 

NO HARM TO HEART OR STOMACH 

THE SAFE WAY TO RELIEVE 

HEADACHE&PAIN 



COPYRIGHT 



/UcnoiaA 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



MIDDLE-AGED MAN OFFERS ADVICE 



TO FATHER 





It is imperative that your body be thoroughly clean inside if it is 

to have the best chance of escaping ailments of all kinds. 

When the liver and kidneys function less efficiently because of old 

age, over-indulgence or other causes, they then no longer keep the 

system fully cleansed of poisonous wastes. 

A teaspoonful of Kruschen taken daily before breakfast in a tumbler 

of hot water stimulates the liver, washes out the kidneys and helps 

them to keep the system free of poisonous wastes. 

A clean internal system keeps the bloodstream clean and healthy. 

Gone are the causes that may lead to such ailments as ... 

RHEUMATISM ACHING JOINTS 

LUMBAGO BACKACHE NEURITIS 



KRUSCHEN 



SALTS 

1/6 & 2/t 
at Chemists 
and Stom. 



The Tonic Effect of Kruschen Keeps Millions of People FJf. 



TO CORRESPONDENTS 

[The columns of this department for the answer$ t<i 
correspondents are designed to prove of genuine help tn4 
benefit to readers who desire information concerning 
matters of dress, housekeeping, etiquette, the toilet, or 
hygiene. In addition to the proper signature (which will 
never be published under any circumstances), corre 
spondents are requested to send a pen-name, to which 
the answer may be addressed.] 

SMOKE STAINS. An easy and sure way 
to remove smoke stains from common plain 
ceilings is to mix wood ashes with the 
whitewash just before applying. A pint of 
ashes to a small pail of whitewash is suffi 
cient, but a little more or less will do no 
harm. Mary C. 

SALADS. Mrs. E. G. writes: "I never 
seem to make satisfactory salads. Mine 
are always amateurish. Can you give 

me a few general hints?" Toss salads 

together lightly and quickly if you wish 
them to be successful. Use crisp greens 
and a well-seasoned dressing. Give the re 
frigerator a chance to chill all ingredients. 
Then let imagination be your guide. Care 
ful measurements may be thrown to the 
winds and a dash of this or a drop of that 
added as fancy dictates. The salad created 
in this manner will be individual, flavour- 
some and inviting. 

PINEAPPLE AND CUCUMBER SALAD. One 
cupful crushed pineapple, 1 cupful diced 
cucumber, i cupful whipped cream, \ cup 
ful mayonnaise. Combine pineapple and 
cucumber. Add whipped cream mixed with 
mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce and garnish 
each salad with two strips of red and green 
pepper. Time in combining, 10 minutes. 
Recipe makes six servings. W.W. 

LOMBARDS. "Who and what were the Lom 
bards?" Londoner. From the 13th cen 
tury Italian merchants, known as the Lom 
bards, traded largely in England as bankers 
and money-lenders, whence the name Lom 
bard street, in London. The Lombards 
were originally a German people who in 
vaded northern Italy during the first cen 
tury. 

SALAD CBEAM (to be bottled for future 
use). Take 1^ gills salad oil, gill malt 
vinegar, 1 gill white vinegar, 1 teaspoons- 
ful caster sugar, 3 teaspoonsful made mus 
tard, salt and pepper to taste, 2 ozs. flour, 
^ pint milk and water, 2 ozs. margarine. 
Make a white sauce with the flour, mar 
garine, milk and water, boiling five min 
utes; when cold, whisk the sauce, add oil 
gradually, then vinegar drop by drop, still 
whisking. Add seasonings. Miss E. A. E. 
ABOUT GLOVES. If you get calfskin or 
other strong kid gloves wet, rub a tiny 
drop of castor oil well in while they are 
still on your hands. This prevents them 
from drying hard and stiff, as they usually 
do after getting wet. Miss F. F. 

CHEESE PUDDING. Required: 6 ozs. of 
good quality cheese, 3 ozs. of breadcrumbs, 
2 fresh eggs, enough milk to make it the 
consistency of batter, salt and pepper. 
Thickly butter a pie-dish. Mix together 
the crumbs, cheese and a good seasoning 
of salt and pepper. Beat up the eggs, add 
a little milk, then stir these into the cheese 
and crumbs, adding more milk if necessary. 
Turn the mixture into the pie-dish and 
bake it in a moderate oven until it is just 
set and nicely coloured on top. Eeader. 

RAW SPINACH SALAD. One Ib. spinach, 
4 or 5 strips of bacon (diced), 1 small 
onion (minced), J cupful wine vinegar, 
salt and pepper to taste. (1) Remove roots 
and, if desired, coarse stems of spinach. 
Wash thoroughly and dry. Tear coarsely 
into a warm bowl. (2) Saute bacon with 
onion till bacon is crisp. Add vinegar, re- 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



heat and pour over spinach. (3) Season 
to taste with salt and pepper and toss 
together till all leaves are well coated with 
the dressing. Yield: four servings. 

DR. W. G. GRACE. This world-famous 
cricketer was born near Bristol in 1848 
and died at the age of 67. He played first- 
class cricket for 36 years and scored 51,000 
runs, with an average of 45 per innings. 
As a bowler his average was 20 runs per 
wicket. He made 121 centuries. Miss 
MeG. - nuppy about n^ .. ,.._ 

arrangement, though I would have pre 
ferred being married here. He had only 
been away two months when I received a 
letter from him saying the marriage was 
off, as he had met a most wonderful girl, 
and would be married to her by the time 
his letter reached me. He had also a lot 
to say about his being a rotter and was 
absolutely ashamd of himself. Could I 
find it in my heart to forgive and forget 
him for ever? It is noble to forgive he 

added as a postscript." Jan. On his 

letter alone you have certainly a first 

class breach of promise case; but is he 

worth .it ? If I were in your place I would 

not go about with a long face and look 

to your friends for sympathy. In fact, I 

would keep the whole episode to myself. 

Don t let this experience make you bitter 

and nurse thoughts of revenge. Be 

thankful and think of the escape you 

^have had. A man who is so unstable and 

It originafe^^x m ?^ e a P oor substitute for 

Kings of Siam,~~who 3 "presen%!/<i e( l 1 3 r is . un - 

elephant to a courtier it was desired to" 

ruin. Netta O. 

FRIED BANANAS. Peel the bananas, cut 
in halves crosswise or in quarters, and roll 
in sifted, dry bread crumbs or in rolled 
corn-flake crumbs. Fry in very hot, deep 
fat (395 degrees F.) until light brown. 
Drain on soft paper and serve with broiled 
chops, steaks, or ham. A simpler method 
is to split the bananas, roll in flour, and 
saute on both sides, using a small amount 
of butter in a hot frying pan. Bananas 
may also be broiled in 3 or 4 minutes. Peel 
and place under the broiler during the 
last few minutes that the meat is broiling. 
New Chum. 

ICENIS. "Who were the Icenis?" L.L.B. 

The Iceni was an ancient British race 

who in early times lived in Norfolk and 
other parts of eastern England. Their 
most famous ruler was Queen Boadicea, 
who led her people against the Romans. 
X-word. 

WHITE FELT HATS. To clean them, make 
a thin paste of magnesia and water and 
rub in with a small brush; dry in the sun, 
after which brush out with a stiff brush. 
Linda Y. 



WINTER CATALOGUE, 1949 

The Australian Home Journal Catalogue of 
Autumn and Winter Fashions is now ready. 
Forty pages of the latest and best fashion 
designs for the new season. All the illustrations 
are printed in colours some of them in three, 
four and five tones. Readers will appreciate this 
publication, depicting artistically Winter sea 
son modes. All departments of dressmaking 
are fully colored for; frocks of all kinds for 
adults and children, including Evening, Dinner 
and Wedding Frocks, Maternity and Matron s 
frocks; Blouses, Sports wear and Undies are 
shown with careful attention to detail. Young 
Folks and Baby Fashions have a section to 
themselves. Price, 1/4J (postal note, I/- and 
4Jd- in stamps). Australian Home Journal, 407- 
409 Kent St., Sydney. 



" : ; ::->:>-::: ::-;::-:: ::*:::* 






"Hollywood-Maxwell," Australia s most 
asked for brassiere . . . Continuous whirlpool 
stitching row after row of it 

gives the beauty Nature intended. 

Faultless support, perfect separation 

even after countless laundering*. 



AS WORN BY THE STARS 



nso.it 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 




with Meds 

safe internal protection 



Women who long to try new-fashioned protection 

will find the new "small-diameter" Meds 
Slender the perfect way to begin. 

But whether you try New Meds Slender 
or New Meds Regular (for greater security) you 

will enjoy internal protection at its bestl 
Next-time try Meds and ask for Meds 
Slender or Meds Regular. 



In boxes of 70 

With or without 

applicators 





THE MODESS TAMPON 
PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 



Daily Health Habits. 

Dally health habits Include care for 
your hair. Koko, the famous 
British Hair Preparation, supplies 
the means of attending to your 
hair. Massage the scalp with Koko, 
then brush your hair vigorously. 
You will be surprised with the 
improvement. Ask your chemist 
JCor: 



KOKO 

FOR THE HAIR 



DRINK HABIT 
DESTROYED 

Do you suffer through the curse of 
excessive drinking? EUCRASY has 
changed homes from misery and 
want to happiness again. Established 
52 years it destroys all desire for 
Alcohol. Harmless, tasteless, can be 
given secretly or taken voluntarily. 
State which required. 

SEND 20/- FULL TWENTY 

DAYS COURSE. 
DEPT. B, EUCRASY CO. 

297 Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



Heart to Heart 



The Wedding Ring: 

"I married a widow and we are very 
happy, as she is loving and kind, and 
is a first-rate housekeeper and home-lover; 
but she annoys me by wearing her first 
husband s wedding ring. Is it correct for 

her to do so?" Arthur L. It is wrong. 

"Off with the old and on with the new" 
applies to ^ "--. -JTifirs as to many other 
oej-i-^igs is to mix wooa u^^^^ i ,u u ^ 
whitewash just before applying. A pint of 
ashes to a small pail of whitewash is suffi 
cient, but a little more or less will do no 
harm. Mary C. 

SALADS. Mrs. E. G. writes: "I never 
seem to make satisfactory salads. Mine 
are always amateurish. Can you give 

me a few general hints ? * Toss salads 

together lightly and quickly if you wish 
them to be successful. Use crisp greens 
and a well-seasoned dressing. Give the re 
frigerator a chance to chill all ingredients. 
Then let imagination be your guide. Care 
ful measurements may be thrown to the 
winds and a dash of this or a drop of that 
added as fancy dictates. The salad created 
in this manner will be individual, flavour- 
some and inviting. 

PINEAPPLE AND CUCUMBER SALAD. One 
cupful crushed pineapple, 1 cupful diced 
cucumber, J cupful whipped cream, J cup 
ful mayonnaise. Combine pineapple, /yii 
cucumber. Add whlpge^L ~" _ ^ \^ t 

S^would serve no useful purpose to even 
talk about it now. If the boot were on 
the other foot would you expect him to 
speak about it? Let the dead past bury 
its dead. 

Not So Young: 

"I don t seem to keep as young as my 
husband. I am in the forties and so is he, 
but he looks younger and has not put on 
weight, while I have to a considerable 
extent. When we are out at a party he 
chats and dances with the young ones, and 
has a good time, while I just sit around or 
gossip with some women older than myself. 
I feel catty and jealous, and often have 
arguments, although I know my husband 
is true to me and loves me very much. 
Do other middle-aged women feel as I do?" 

S.P.R. In the forties you should be 

very charming, bright and alert. You have 
let yourself grow old. Go in for massage 
and exercise and hair-do s and don t let 
yourself slip. So many find it much easier 
to be careless and slouch along, and make 
the excuse that housework and home duties 
have played havoc with them. We have to be 
up and doing, look after ourselves, and 
keep young by mixing with young folks 
and stay away from the older set, with 
whom we have not much in common. A 
bright, healthful outlook and careful per 
sonal attention can work wonders. 
Adopted Child: 

"The doctor has told me I can never 
have a baby, and both my husband and 
self want to adopt one. I am wondering 
if I could ever love an adopted baby as 
though she were my own child?" Anxious. 

Don t approach the subject from that 

angle. I know a number of parents who 
have adopted children and have brought 
them up as their own. The experiment 
has been eminently successful. When you 
have brought a child up from babyhood 
you get to love it just as though it were 
your own flesh and blood. You will both 
be very happy with an adopted baby, 
more particularly as you will be able to 
give it a good home. You will be surprised 
what a difference this will make in your 
married life. Just look at the other side 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



of the picture a childless couple can 
quickly drift apart. Children are the 
golden link that bind the home. 

Broken Engagement: 

"I am heartbroken. I was engaged to a 
young man holding a good position in one 
of our interstate firms. We were to have 
been married in a few months time; then 
he was shifted to West Australia, and was 
given an increase of salary. He said as 
soon as he got settled down he would post 
me my fare and we could be married in 
Perth. I was quite happy about the whole 
arrangement, though I would have pre 
ferred being married here. He had only 
been away two months when I received a 
letter from him saying the marriage was 
off, as he had met a most wonderful girl, 
and would be married to her by the time 
his letter reached me. He had also a lot 
to say about his being a rotter and was 
absolutely ashamd of himself. Could I 
find it in my heart to forgive and forget 
him for ever? It is noble to forgive he 

added as a postscript." Jan. On his 

letter alone you have certainly a first 
class breach of promise case; but is he 
worth .it ? If I were in your place I would 
not go about with a long face and look 
to your friends for sympathy. In fact, I 
would keep the whole episode to myself. 
Don t let this experience make you bitter 
and nurse thoughts of revenge. Be 
thankful and think of the escape you 
have had. A man who is so unstable and 
untrue would make a poor substitute for 
a husband. His conduct admittedly is un 
speakably callous and brutal and he is a 
fit subject for a horse-whipping; but even 
that won t get you anywhere. The sins 
we commit in this world are often paid for 
in this world. There are some things so 
low that you would not even touch them 
with a long stick. Forget that he ever 
existed and look to the future cheerfully. 
Returned Visit: 

"I have a girl friend with whom I used 
to go to school who has married a big 
noise in the city. He is the managing 
director of a public company. They have 
been married for ten years and have a 
beautiful home at Vaucluse and a lovely 
seaside residence at Palm Beach. I have 
not married, but hold a good position with 
a business firm. I have my own little flat, 
well furnished, and comfortable, and am 
always busy and happy. I often go down 
to their seaside home for week-ends, and 
have spent quite a number of holidays 
with them; but I feel I cannot recipro 
cate adequately and am just like a poor 
relation. I have told my girl friend 
this but she just laughs at me, and tells 
me not to be a fool. They both just love 

having me with them." Ma dge. 1 

would not worry if I were you. They cannot 
expect a single girl who is not in their 
class for money to reciprocate to any 
extent. Why not occasionally get theatre 
matinee tickets for a Saturday and ask 
them to have lunch at your flat before 
going to the show. They will like that. 
Folks who live in the high life way would 
like nothing better than to see how you 
manage in your little two-by-two flat. 



STAMPS NOT ACCEPTED. 

Readers are again reminded that 
we do not take postage stamps in 
payment of pattern orders. Only 
postal notes or money orders will 
be accepted. 



A single conversation across the table 
with a wise person is worth a month s study 
of books. 



The Doctor Answers 



ABOUT BACKACHE: 




Patient: "Why do so many people suffer with Backache 
Doctor?" 

Doctor: "Because your back muscles are working constantly 
holding up your body, any extra strain is quickly felt- 
again, uric acid and other poisons often collect in 
these muscles if your kidneys and bowels are not 
functioning well and correctly." 

Patient: "But, why. Doctor, do these poisons in the blood 

so often affect the muscles of the back?" 
Doctor: "For the reason I gave just now you feel the effect 

of these blood poisons in the weakest or mst over 
worked parts of your body first. If you feel the 

effects m your back muscles, you can be sure they 

are everywhere in your muscles and joints, and the 

sensible thing to do is to get rid of these poisons as 

quickly as you can." 

If you suffer from Backache, rheumatic pains, sciatica, himbago, kidney and 
bladder weaknesses, neuritis, gout, or similar aches and pains, you will be 
delighted with the relief and renewed energy Menthoids 
will give you. Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids contain Thionine 
the great blood medicine which does so much to drive 
out these crippling poisons from your blood, strengthen 
your kidneys and tone mp your whole system. 

Get a month s treatment fiask of Dr. Mackenzie s 
Menthoids for 6/6 with Diet Chart, or a 12-day 
flask for 3/6, from your nearest chemist or store, 
or a postal note to British Medical Laboratories, 
Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney, will bring yon 
Menthoids by return mail. 




MENTHOIDS* BACKACHE 



HER RHEUMATISM GOES AS SHE LOSES UGLY FAT 

Great London Hosprtal endorses famous Youth-0-Forra 

"For many years," says Mrs. Fitzpatrick, "I have boen crippled with rheumatism, 
until some friends recommended me to take Youth-O-FDrm to reduce my weight. 
[ DID KEDUCE and, more marvellous still, my rheumatism completely disappeared. 
That was four years ago. The London winter I find very severe, and this year I 
got rheumatism badly again, and all the prescriptions were useless. I told my doctor, 
who is leading physician at one of the big hospitals here, that Youth-O-Poi-n: was 
the only thing that ever did me any good, and he advised me to try it again and 
that the Youth-O-Form prescription was 
well known. Once again I am quite well 
and fit." 

If you are overweight and 
suffer from Rheumatism, 
Indigestion, Constipation, 
or constant headaches, 
Youth-0-Form will help 
you, too. 



Mrs. Darley, pictured below, ts only 
one of countless Australian women 
who have regained health and appear 
ance through Youth-O-Form. 



WHAT YOU SHOULD WEIGH 


Height 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35 -JO 


ft. in. 


st. Ib. 


st. Ib. 


St. It). 


at. Ib. 


st it> 


4 11 


7 5 


7 8 


7 11 


8 


8 n 


5 


7 7 


7 10 


7 13 


8 2 


8 5 


5 1 


7 9 


7 12 


8 1 


8 4 


8 7 


5 2 


7 12 


8 1 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


5 3 


8 1 


8 4 


8 6 


8 9 


8 13 


5 4 


8 4 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


5 5 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


9 7 


5 6 


8 11 


9 


9 3 


9 7 


9 11 


5 7 


9 1 


9 4 


9 7 


9 11 


10 1 


5 8 


9 5 


9 8 


9 11 


10 1 


10 5 


Add Sib. for every fire years cter forty. 




Youth-O-Form is pleasant, effective per- 

lent and easy to 

can get the six weeks Youth-O-t-o- u 
Treatment for ? V- (or a 10-duy 
.rton, 5/0 1 from your near,, st 
,emist. 

If far from a Chemist, pin 
a Postal Note to a piece of 
paper with your namp and 
"ress; spnd it to British 
" cal Lnbc 

4155, G.PO S d- 
( , and your Youth-O- 
Form will re. Ch 
11 by return rrail 
tinly wrapped 
and with full 
dirpctions for 
use. 

Y4* 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 




of difference to jour dress materials . 



Now it makes a world of difference to all 

furnishing fabrics, too 



Now you can buy a complete range 
of Grafton furnishing fabrics. 

All guaranteed fadeless. Every linen, glazed 
chintz and cretonne in the Grafton range can be 
washed and washed as often as you would 
wash a dress should you ever wish to. And 
remember the glazed chintz is permanent. 
The patterns ? Lovely ! For every type of room. 

Ask to see Grafton furnishing fabrics for 
curtains and loose covers in all leading furnishing 
departments throughout Australia. 



THE GRAFTON 
FURNISHING RANGE 

Linens 31 and 48 

Cretones 3 1 and 48 

Merriecolor 48 

Brocaded rayon-and-cotton 48" 

Ptrmanent Glazed Chintz 31 and 43 

GP.5. 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 





[This Reindeer Sports-Jumper will find 
a lot of admirers. The lady in the photo 
in Joan Lorring, of Warner Bros. First 
National Pictures, who have kindly given 
us permission to reproduce this photograph. 
The knitting instructions are by our 
Needlework Expert.] 

Materials: 8 skeins of 3-ply crepe red 
wool and 7 skeins of white; 2 bone knitting 
needles No. 10 and 2 No. 12. 

Measurements: Length of jumper from 
shoulder, 18^ inches; width at under-arm, 
32-34 inches; sleeve, 18 inches. 

Abbreviations: k., knit; p., purl; tog., 
together; sts., stitches; R., red; W., white. 

Tension: 8 sts. equals 1 inch in width 
and 9 rows equals 1 inch in depth. 
The Front. 

Using No. 12 needles and red wool, cast 
on 124 sts. and work in a ribbing of k. 2, 
p. 2 for 3$ inches, increasing 1 st. at end 
of last row (125 sts.). Join white wool 
and weave at back of red wool when not 
in use; also weave red wool at back of 
white wool when not in use, as follows: 
Pass the wool out of action once over the 
working thread before working each st. 
with the second colour so that the spare 
thread is caught at the back of work with 
every stitch. Change to No. 10 needles 
and work as follows: 

Row 1 Knit. 

Row 2 Purl. 

Repeat these 2 rows once. 

Row 6 k. 6 R., * 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 
1 W., 7 R. Repeat from * to last 11 sts., 
1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 6 R. 

Row 6 p. 7 R., * 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 9 R. 
Repeat from * to last 10 sts., 1 W., 1 R., 
1 W., 7 R. 

Row 7 k. 8 R., * 1 W., 11 R. Repeat 
from * to last 9 sts., 1 W., 8 R. 

Row 8 p. with red. 

Row 9 k. with red. 

Row 10 p. with red. 

Row 11* k. 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 
T R. Repeat from * to last 5 sts., 1 W., 
1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W. 

Row 12 p. 1 R., * 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 9 R. 
Repeat from * to last 4 sts., 1 R., 1 W., 
1 R., 1 W. 

Row IS k. 2 R., 1 W., 11 R. Repeat 
from * to last 3 sts., 1 W., 2 R. 

Row 14 p. with red. 

Row 15 k. with red. 

Row 16 p. with red. 

Repeat these 12 rows, increasing 1 st. 
at both ends of the needle of every 8th 
row, keeping continuity of pattern until 
there are 133 sts. Work then without 
shaping until there are 10 rows of white 
triangles, ending with the three rows 
worked in red; then work as follows: 

Row 1 * k. 1 W., 11 R. Repeat from * 
to last st., 1 W. 

Row 2 p. 1 R., 1 W., 9 R., 1 W. Repeat 
from * to last st., 1 R. 

Row 3* k. 1, W., 1 R., 1 W., 7 R., 1 W., 
1 R. Repeat from * to last st., 1 W. 

Row 4 p. 1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 5 R., 
1 W., 1 R., 1 W. Repeat from * to last st., 
1 R. 

Row 5 k. 1 W.. 1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 
8 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 1 R. Repeat from * 
to last st., 1 W. 

Row 6* p. 1 R., 1 W. Repeat from * 
to last st., 1 R. 

Row 7* k. 2 R., (1 W., 1 R.) 5 times. 
Repeat from * to last st., 1 R. 

Row 8* p. 3 R., (1 W., 1 R) 4 times, 
1 R. Repeat from * to last st., 1 R. 



Row 9 * k. 4 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 1 R., 

1 W., 3 R. Repeat from * to last st., 1 R. 
Row 10* p. 5 R., 1 W., 1 R., 1 W., 4 R. 

Repeat from * to last st., 1 R. 

Row 11* k. 6 R., 1 W., 5 R. Repeat 
from * to last st., 1 R. 

Row 12 p. with red wool. 

Row 13 k. 21 R., 3 W., 31 R., 4 W., 
15 R., 4 W., 31 R., 3 W., 21 R. 

Row 14 p. 19 R., 3 W., 2 R., 3 W., 2 R., 

2 W., 22 R., 2 W., 23 R, 2 W., 22 R., 2 W., 
2 R., 3 W., 2 B., 3 W., 19 R. 



4 R., 1 W., 11 R., 1 W., 2 R., 2 W., 1 R, 

3 W., 45 R., 3 W., 1 R., 2 W., 2 R., 1 W, 
11 R., 1 W., 4 R., 1 W., 12 R. 

Row 19 k. 2 tog., k. 10 R., 1 W., 3 R 
2 W., 11 R., 1 W., 4 R., 1 W., 51 R., 1 W 

4 R., 1 W., 11 R., 2 W., 3 R., 1 W., 10 R 
k. 2 tog. R. 

Row 20 p. 10 R., 2 W., 3 R., 1 W 
18 R., 3 W., 45 R., 3 W., 18 R., 1 W., 3 R 
2 W., 10 R. 

Row 21 k. 2 tog., k. 8 R., 2 W., 3 R 

1 W., 18 R., 1 W., 2 R., 2 W., 41 R., 2 W 

2 R., 1 W., 18 R., 1 W., 3 R., 2 W., 8 R 
k. 2 tog. R. 

Row 22 p. 8 R., 2 W., 3 R., 2 W., 18 R 
1 W., 1 R., 2 W., 1 R., 2 W., 37 R., 2 W 




Row 16 k. 19 R., 1 W., 4 R., 1 W., 3 R., 
2 W., 1 R., 3 W., 16 R., 3 W., 2 R., 1 W., 
21 R., 1 W., 2 R., 3 W., 16 R., 3 W., 1 R., 

2 W., 3 R, 1 W., 4 R., 1 W., 19 R. . 
Row 16 p. 19 R., 1 W., 4 R., 1 W., 

9 R., 3 W., 10 R., 3 W., 33 R., 3 W., 10 R., 

3 W., 9 R., 1 W., 4 R., 1 W., 19 R. 

Row 17 Cast off 6 sts, k. 12 R. (count 
ing the st. on needle after cast off), 2 W., 
3 R., 1 W., 12 R., 2 W., 6 R., 3 W., 39 R., 
3 W., 6 R., 2 W., 12 R., 1 W., 3 R., 2 W., 
18 R. 

Row 18 Cast off 6 sts., p. 12 R. (count 
ing the st. on needle after cast off), 1 W., 



1 R., 2 W., 1 R., 1 W., 18 R., 2 W., 3 R. 

2 W., 8 R. 

Row 23 k. 2 tog., R., k. 6 R., 2 W., 2 R. 
2 W., 19 R., 1 W., 4 R., 3 W., 35 R., 3 W. 
4 R., 1 W., 19 R., 2 W., 2 R., 2 W., 6 R, 
k. 2 tog. R. 

Row 24 p. 7 R., 2 W., 2 R., 2 W., 19 R. 
1 W., 1 R., 2 W., 1 R., 2 W., 37 R., 2 W.i 

1 R., 2 W., 1 R., 1 W., 19 R., 2 W., 2 R.i 

2 W., 7 R. 

Row 25 k. 2 tog. R., k. 5 R., 2 W., 2 R. 

3 W., 18 R., 1 W., 6 R., 1 W., 35 R., 1 W.; 
6 R., 1 W., 18 R., 3 W., 2 R., 2 W., 5 R., 
k. 2 tog. R. [ Turn to page 50 j 



10 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



CALL ME JOHNNIE 

By LILIAN CHISHOLM. 

Falling in love is a very unaccountable thing because it is quite easy to be 
desperately in love and not know it. 



The sound of Helen s heels was like that 
of hail against a window-pane, as she hur 
ried down the hospital corridor towards the 
exit. She was thoroughly annoyed, and 
for several reasons. 

The first and most important reason was 
that she had quite expected to be Derek s 
only visitor. She had looked forward to 
playing a rather romantic part had 
planned that Derek should realise that one 
friend alone out of all the noisy crowd 
which surrounded him in health, only one 
loyal friend re 
membered him 
when he was ill. 



wretched place, flowers, book and all her 
rehearsed speeches complete. 

She stopped abruptly, noticing a rubbish 
bin hanging against the brick wall. With 
an impatient gesture she was just about 
to drop the roses into the bin when a 
voice said urgently: 

"Here, you can t do that!" 

Helen stopped, all her mounting anger 
gathering itself into a fury. She turned 
and looked at a man in a white coat 
probably a student. 




reluctantly, "but he had so many. Who 
do you want them for, then; one of the 
patients here!" 

He took the roses and turned to go. 
Then suddenly he turned back to her. 

"You give them to him," he said 
abruptly. "Would you? It might help a 
lot if he saw you." 

She stared at him, wondering if every 
body in this hospital was either mad or 
mean. 

"I m sorry," she began firmly, "but I 
don t think you understand. I came to 
visit my fiance . . ." she swallowed hard 
over the exaggeration, "and I don t think 
he would care for me to go round present 
ing roses to strange young men . . ." 

"Bah!" said the man. Just that. Then 
he took hold of her arm, and turned her 
round. 

"This way," he said shortly, "and if 
you ve ever . done any thinking in your 
precious life, start 
thinking now. And 
if you ever did any 
acting in your life 
and I never knew a 
female who didn t 
want to! act for 
dear life now. A lot 




She had bought the 
roses with such care, 
carried them so tenderly, 
had spent almost three-quarters of her 
precious lunch hour choosing a book she 
thought he would enjoy, and what hap 
pened? People literally thronged Derek s 
private room, and it wasn t until Matron, 
red-faced and portly, had dispelled them 
with a glance that Helen had had a chance 
to speak to Derek at all. 

One of the hospital nurses, obviously 
with no sense of romance in her entire 
make-up, had hung around the doorway, so 
that Helen could not bring herself to give 
Derek the flowers, nor the book, nor say 
any of the things she had rehearsed so 
carefully. 

Finally, with a superior smile, the nurse 
had ordered Helen from the room, and 
here she was hiwrying to be rid of this 



"You don t have to come 
to see me, Miss," he told 
her bluntly, "I m OK." 



It occurred to her that he was quite 
ugly, and obviously bad-tempered. 

"Is it one of your hospital by-laws that 
flowers may not be dumped in rubbish 
bins?" she inquired icily. 

He glared at her, his eyes almost hidden 
by ferocious dark brows. 

"Just because you don t want them, it 
doesn t mean nobody does," he said im 
patiently. "Let me have them." Then, 
quite obviously as an afterthought, he 
added, "Please." 

She lifted the flowers hesitantly, and 
!ooked at them. 

"They are rather nice," she tdmitted 



depends on this, re- 
; member." 

She started to re 
monstrate, but the 
ward doors had 
opened and closed behind 
them before she had time 
to get going. The man in 
the white coat approached 
a bed in the corner, a bed around which 
stood a high screen. 

"You have a visitor," Helen heard him 
say to what seemed to be a mound in the 
very middle of the bed. No face appeared, 
and for a moment nothing at all happened. 
Then, out of the depths, came a very small 
voice. 

"Stop kiddin ," said the voice, "I don t 
have no visitors." 

Helen s hand tightened round the roses. 
She bent down and gave the little mound a 
push. 

"Perhaps not," she said clearly. "But 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



11 



you have one now. I ve brought you some 
flowers." 

At that, the bed-clothes went down, and 
what must surely have been the smallest 
face in the world looked out. 

It might have been any age, that face, 
from five to fifteen, for, whilst it still 
carried the delicate curves of childhood, 
the eyes were as old, and as tired, as those 
of an aged man. 

Helen drew a swift breath. She wanted, 
more than anything in the world, to turn 
and run away from this something that 
she did not understand. 

"Bill, old chap," said the man in the 
white coat, "say something to your visitor, 
won t you?" 

The boy sat up. His hair, against his 
white face, was a pitiless red, and freckles 
stood OMt across the snub nose. He looked 
at Helen. 

"You don t have to come to see me, 
miss," he told her bluntly. "I m O.K." 

Helen sat down beside the bed, still 
holding the flowers. 

"You don t remember me, of course," 
she said on the spur of the moment. "You 
were only a baby last time I saw you. I ve 
been away, for for years. As soon as I 
heard you were ill I came at once, Bill. 
You must hurry up and get well." 

"Why?" asked Bill. 

She couldn t do anything but stare at 
the boy. The question hung in the air 
between them like some small, ugly spider, 
ready to drop on its prey. She sought 
desperately, feverishly for an answer, the 
right answer. She looked up, and saw the 
man watching her, his eyes urging her to 
say something something right. But what 
did you say to an ageless boy who asked 
the why for of his reason for living? 

She thought hard. She thought of Derek, 
comfortable upstairs, surrounded by books 
and flowers, probably even now writing 
her a loving letter. She thought of the 
past weeks, when love had -seemed to be 
blooming before her very eyes, of the night 
when it had seemed certain that Derek 
was about to propose to her, until an angry 
appendix had snatched him away to this 
place in a nightmare of excitement and 
emergency, and then she knew what to 
say. 

She leaned forward persuasively. 

"Because it s so exciting and such fun," 
she pronounced triumphantly. "That s why 
you have to get well quickly." 

The man in the white coat turned away. 
For a moment Bill watched that white- 
clad back. Then he suddenly grinned. 

"What s fun about itf" he asked curi 
ously, and she realised, with a pang, that 
he really wanted to know. She took a 
deep breath and put the roses on the bed. 

"Lots of things are fun," she said firmly, 
her mind going back to her own childhood. 
"Like running on the heath; walking 
across the pond when it is frozen; eating 
toast in front of a huge fire on cold nights; 
going for long walks in the rain . . ." 

She paused, feeling foolish. Besides, 
when had she found those things fun? 
Weren t they all the ridiculous, childish 
things she had determined to push out of 
her life from now onwards? Derek had 
taught Her about a new kind of life where 
those things seemed trivial and useless. 

"Go on," the boy said. "What else?" 

The man turned then. He pushed the 
boy back against the pillows, and he 
smiled. 

"Not to-night, old chap," he said easily. 
"She ll come again to-morrow. You must 
Bleep now." 



A flash of frank incredulity touched the 
small face. 

"Garn!" he said bluntly, "she won t come 
again. Why should she?" 

Indeed, she asked herself, once more out 
in the corridor, why should she? Derek 
would soon be well again, and she would 
wipe the memory of this cold, horrible 
place out of her mind and memory. This 
man must be crazy if he thought she had 
nothing else to do but run round visiting 
queer little boys. 

He s eight," he told her casually, as she 
began to wish him good-night. "He has 
no people, and he won t get better." 

She felt angry. She gathered her short 
fur coat around her, suddenly cold. 

"How can you possibly know that?" she 
objected. "He s pale, of course, but chil 
dren are often pale, and he doesn t seem to 
be in any pain at all. And I m sorry, but 
I can t possibly come again . . ." 

"No, I suppose not," he said quietly. 
"It s just that when you are interested in 
a patient you are apt to forget that every 
body does not share that interest. It was 
good of you tp see him at all. His operation 
is to-morrow, and he s scared stiff. I 
thought it might help a bit, seeing you 
thinking somebody cared about him." 

She turned and hurried down the corri 
dor, her eyes hostile. It was only a trick 
to win her sympathy, of course. These 
doctors were impossible; a race of people 
who thought nothing mattered but the 
patient they happened to be interested in 
at the moment. Of course, he was exag 
gerating about the boy . . . 

At the exit she turned and saw that the 
doctor had not moved, but was standing 
still, staring down at his hands. She took a 
step back . . . 

"Why don t you think he will get well?" 
she asked abruptly. 

"Because he doesn t see any reason why 
he should," he told her without looking 
up. "His operation is at five in the even 
ing. Good-night." 

She went home to her flat and told her 
self, very firmly, that she must put the 
whole matter out of her mind. To-morrow 
afternoon, at five, she would be at the 
office, as usual, thinking of the letter from 
Derek which was sure to be waiting when 
she arrived home, and which might very 
well contain the question she had been 
waiting, so long. Derek, with time to think, 
might have come to the conclusion that he 
could not live without Helen, just as she 
had come to the same conclusion about 
him. Together they would make of life a 
merry, glorious thing, filled with laughter 
and romance, adventure and success. 

Derek had no time for the silly senti 
mental things of life, and neither had she, 
not any more . . . 

The phone rang, and she answered it 
eagerly. 

"I m ringing from St. Dominic s Hos 
pital," a girl s voice told her. "Mr. Derek 
Simpson asked me to ring you when I 
came off duty. He says will you come to 
see him to-morrow afternoon, round about 
four? There is something he particularly 
wishes to ask you." 

She mumbled something she never 
knew quite what it was. She replaced the 
receiver and sat down, smiling into space. 
It had come at last. Derek was anxious 
to see her, and he was going to ask her to 
marry him . . . 

All through the next day she felt rest 
less, and told herself it was because she 
was to see Derek in the afternoon. For 
tunately she had an afternoon off due to 



her, so that by three o clock she was hurry 
ing along towards the hospital, her eyes 
bright, more flowers clutched in her hand. 

As she went along the corridor of the 
hospital her heels clicked sharply, recall 
ing the previous night. Then her foot 
steps slowed a little, hesitated outside the 
ward door. Another two hours and a small 
boy would be trundled down this corridor 
towards 

She turned and plunged in, the doors 
swishing angrily behind her, a nurse turn 
ing to look at her in swift surprise. 

The screen was still around the bed, and 
the doctor was standing there, talking to 
the boy. The man looked tired, and the 
boy sullen. 

They both stared at Helen as she came 
towards them. 

"Look," she said firmly, sitting down 
and ignoring the doctor. "I hate saying 
this but aren t you a bit of a coward?" 

The colour ran up those thin cheeks like 
a crimson banner. 

"I ain t " began the boy indignantly, 

but she put the flowers into his hands and 
leaned forward. 

"There s something you ve forgotten," 
she said clearly. "You re not the only 
lonely person in the world; do you realise 
that? I m just as lonely as you are, but 
I don t start moaning about it, and refus 
ing to get well, just because I m lonely, 
do I? If you re lonely, too, why don t we 
get together about it? I ve got a house; 
it s quite small, but it s rather cosy." 

The .doctor turned to the window and 
stared out. The boy fixed his eyes on 
Helen s face. 

"Tell me about the house. Can you see 
a fellow in it what is clumsy with his 
feet?" 

She had a momentary vision of her 
immaculate little flat, with the high-gloss 
paint, the delicate brocade. She laughed. 

"Who cares?" she demanded, "this is a 
real house, Bill! The carpets are old, so 
that we don t have to worry about them. 
In the hall there s a big log fire, always 
summer and winter. It s there we shall 
eat toast in the winter, Bill. Down the 
foot of the hill there s a pond, and in sum 
mer we ll swim there, Bill. You can swim?" 

"Beckon I could if he taught me," he 
offered shyly. 

"He?" 

He grinned sheepishly. 

"We d want to make it right," his voice 
was practical. "One home has two folks, 
don t it? All the chaps I know have a 
mother and a father, like. You d have to 
have a fellow, wouldn t you? Then you d 
marry him, and it d make things right. 
What sort of fellow shall you have, miss?" 

She remembered her -secret that secret 
love upstairs, waiting for her. 

"Yes," she said complacently. "I ll have 
a fellow, Bill. Tall and dark and hand 
some . . ." 

"Garn!" scoffed Bill disgustedly. "That 
sounds like a softy. Our fellow has to be 
real, see? It don t matter what he looks 
like so long as he s a sport . . ." 

Helen gave him that, and from there 
they went on building an imaginary world 
which would never exist anywhere but in 
the heart of a small boy who was who 
was 

She got up abruptly, pushing back her 
chair. 

"Bill, now you see why you must get 
well, don t you?" She hoped her voice 
didn t sound as choky as it felt. "Because 
I ll be waiting for you along with the 
house and . . ." 



12 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



"The fellow?" asked Bill, winking. "Let s 
call him Johnnie, shall we?" 


It was almost five o clock when Helen 
went upstairs. 

Derek s nurse met her at the door of 
his room, and eyed her reproachfully. 

"You re too late," she said firmly, "he is 
resting now. He has been expecting you 
all the afternoon." 

So Helen went home, somewhat deflated, 
and wrote a long letter to Derek, explain 
ing everything. 

Somehow, when the words were down on 
paper they seemed rather flat and uncon 
vincing. Evidently Derek shared her 
opinion, for he didn t bother to reply. 

She did not go near the hospital for a 



chap who promised to decorate my flat for 
me? Also the boss I want to introduce 
you to him, so put on your best bib and 
tucker, won t you?" 

She was late leaving the office that even 
ing, so that it was almost seven when she 
arrived at the hospital. 

The doctor came to her in the small 
waiting room. 

"He came through the operation," he 
told her simply. "But he isn t rallying 
too well. I want you to help him, if you 
will. He seems to need a constant incen 
tive to live, and at present he hasn t one. 
If you would just persuade him to believe 
in that stuff you told him, we can easily 
tell him the truth when he is quite well 
and strong again. He s a sensible kid 
he ll understand. It s just to help him 
through this critical period. 
I know it s asking a lot of 

you, but " he smiled 

wearily, "the kid seemed 
to take a fancy to you, and 
has asked for you to-day." 
She was late for the 
party, of course, but it 
didn t seem to matter, be 
cause there were 
so many people 
in the small flat 
that it seemed 
nobody had rea 
lised that she 




made it up. It s queer, because all the 
time you were telling Bill about it, it 
made me think of my own home. Hadn t 
thought of the old place for years " 

"I don t know how it happened, but as 
soon as I started trying to build a home 
for Bill, I remembered my own home. It 
was bombed, you know, during the war, 
and my parents live in a different house 
now. I hope he won t be too disappointed 
when he sees it?" 

"You ve been wonderful to Bill." The 
doctor smiled at her. "I didn t think he 
would ever survive the operation. Now, 
if he goes on as he is doing, he ll be well 
enough to go to your mother s place in a 
few weeks, all being well. Do you think 
you should warn him that it isn t quite the 
same house?" 

"I don t know . . ." 

Bill worried her as he grew stronger, 
for he could talk of nothing but the house. 

When the day came that he was strong 
enough to travel, Bill was so excited that 
the doctor eyed Helen anxiously. 

"You ll need to tackle this thing care 
fully," he told her gravely. "Sometimes 
I wonder if I did a foolish thing in allow 
ing it all to start. I only knew Bill was 
desperately ill. I didn t realise the tremen 
dous will-power he had when well. It s 
not going to be pleasant telling Bill you 
have been leading him up the garden all 
these weeks. I wish . . ." 

Helen nver knew what he wished be 
cause she was so disturbed she re 
fused to listen to any more of the 
doctor s anxieties. 

Derek had been im 
possible when he knew 



"You ve been in the picture all 
along, Doc so far as I m con 
cerned." 




week. She phoned to know the result of 
the operation, and was given an evasive 
reply, the only sure fact of which seemed 
to be that Bill could have no visitors. She 
received the same answer day after day, 
until at last, about a week later, when she 
phoned, she was asked to call at the hos 
pital that afternoon. 

It was unfortunate that Derek should 
also ring, just after the hospital call, to 
tell her that he was back home again, fit 
and well, and holding a "house warming" 
party that night, to which, of course, she 
was invited. 

"I have forgiven you everything, sweet," 
Derek told her blithely, "you must come 
to-night, because there s something very 
special 1 want to discuss with you. Eankin 
is coming, too you know, darling, the 



was missing. Derek was so terribly busy 
making a good impression on his boss that 
he had no time to listen to her explanation 
as to her lateness. 

"Tell me some other time, sweetheart," 
he told her anxiously. "Nothing matters 
now but old Kathers." 

She went to see Bill day after day and 
that helped her not to fret quite so much 
about Derek s rather casual behaviour. 
She drew on her own childhood, trying to 
reconstruct it for him. She found herself 
building up a picture which fascinated her 
almost as much as it did Bill. 

On an impulse one evening, after leav 
ing the hospital, she wrote to her mother, 
asking if she could bring Bill to stay with 
her for a time when he was strong enough. 

"You mean that the house you have 
been describing is a real one?" the doctor 
asked her, surprised when she told him of 
this plan. "I always thought you had 



she was giving up a 
week-end to BUI and 
had asked some rather 
leading questions, almost suggesting that 
Bill was not a child at all, but a mysteri 
ous rival to himself! 

When she had convinced him as to Bill s 
age, he laughed at her rather unpleasantly. 

"What you want is a real job to do," he 
told her. "When we re married I won t 
allow any of this Lady Bountiful* stuff. 
People only take advantage of it, you 
know." 

The long journey tired Bill. He was 
fretful and sleepy when they arrived at 
the small stone house. 

Bill eyed the place silently, and allowed 
himself to be taken indoors by a large, 
plump woman remarkably like Helen when 
she smiled. 

He sat silent all through tea, inspecting 
the small room, the faded carpet, the small 
fireplace. There was no open log-fire, no 
long wide banisters down which a chap 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



13 



could slide, no bead curtains at the door, 
and obviously no pond anywhere near. 

It was when it was time for bed that he 
came out into the open. 

"You was just kidding, wasn t you?" he 
asked Helen simply. "This house don t 
belong to you. I ain t going to live here, 
not really. There s none of the things you 
said, and I want to go back to the doctor. 
He don t tell me lies " 

Helen looked at the small, pale, accusing 
face of the boy on the couch. Then she 
went and knelt down beside him. 

"I didn t tell you lies, Bill," she said 
carefully. "The house I described to you 
was just any house, any home, don t you 
see? I knew a house like it when I was 
a child; I lived in it with my mother. It 
was the only real home I knew, so when I 
wanted to describe one I naturally de 
scribed that. But my mother lost her 
house in the war. Lots of people lost lots 
of things more preci6us than houses in 
the war. Bill you know that. 

"But that didn t stop them wanting 
homes, just as you want one, you under 
stand? They had to start all over again, 
building up new lives, new homes. 

"But all the things that matter go into 
the new homes, just as they did in the old 
ones. It isn t the rooms, or the fireplaces, 
or the surroundings, that make homes, Bill 
it s the people inside them. Wherever my 
mother was, there would be my home, until 
the day I make one for myself and those 
I love. 

"We re going to find a house, Bill, one 
day you and me; do you believe that? I 
want you to stay here until that time 
comes, and I swear to make it soon. It ll 



be our house, Bill. We ll have a dog, our 
favourite walks, our favourite days, every 
thing of our own . . ." 

He was watching her intently. 

"And the fellow?" he asked. "You don t 
have a fellow, either, do you?" 

"No, Bill," she said. "I don t have a 
fellow. That was the only real mistake. 
I did have one, but he wouldn t belong in 
our home, Bill. He could never learn to 
like the things we like. He was tall, and 
dark, and handsome and he was no use to 
you and me, old boy. We ll have to find 
another fellow one day. We ll both have 
to wait, Bill, for a while, but it will all 
come true one day, if you help me." 

"Helen," said her mother at the door, 
"there s somebody called to see you." 

A man stood in the doorway. He was 
rather plain, and his eyes were the eyes of 
a man who has spent many long vigils 
whilst others slept. 

"I had to come," said the doctor, "just to 
make sure you had both arrived safely 
and were all right." 

"Everything is O.K., doctor," Bill chipped 
in, and nodded quickly, with an impish 
grin; "her and me, we ve decided to make 
our own home, see? Only thing we re 
short of is the Johnnie fellow, remember? 
There had to be a Johnnie in our house, 
and so far we ain t got one. Any sugges 
tions?" 

The doctor looked at Helen. 

She saw him, for the first time, not just 
as a doctor, but as a lonely young man who 
was so busy looking after others he had 
forgotten to look after himself ... a man 
she could love. 

"I thought all that was arranged," he 



said, a sudden light in his eyes. "But if 
I can help in any way I ll gladly do so. 
Helen do you think you could call me 
Johnnie? I d try to fit into the picture." 

Bill laughed for the first time since 
they had known him. 

"Garn," he said, "you ve been in the pic 
ture all along, Doc. far as I m concerned. 
What do you say, miss?" 

Helen stood up, her cheeks flushed, her 
eyes shy. 

She played for time, seeing that the 
doctor was watching her intently. 

"I don t know," she said hesitantly. 
"What is your real name, anyway?" 

It was the doctor s turn to smile. 

"Johnnie," he said simply as he took a 
step towards them, "John s my name!" 

* T 

Eain can ruin your hair-wave if you are 
not wearing a hat. Always have a hair net 
in your bag, so that you can put it on if 
you are caught in a shower. It will prevent 
your set coming out. 



KNITTED AND CROCHET TOYS 

We have published a booklet which 
will be appreciated by those interested in 
knitted and crochet toys. Full instructions 
and illustrations are given for the follow 
ing: The Duck; A Cuddlesome Pup; Our 
Fluffy Lamb; Christmas Doll Set, compris 
ing Coat, Dress, Boottees, Bonnet, Singlet 
and Pilchers; Eddie, the Elephant; Knitted 
Lamb; Jumbo in Crochet; Poodle Purse; 
Humpty Dumpty; Mickey Mouse. The 
ideal instruction book for toy-makers and 
Red Cross workers. Send I/- postal note 
for a copy. 




iiilM 



MARYS 



BAKING 



POWDER 




(IN THE NEW RED AND WHITE LABEL.) 



Use Aunt Mary s Baking Powder according to instructions 
in any recognised Recipe or Cookery Book. 

Ask for AUNT MARY S Pure Food Products. 



14 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



This pretty 



twin set! 




Just one of the ciiarming new styles in Sun-glo Knitting 
Book Series 117, now on sale. You can buy Sun-glo 
Knitting Books at all newsagents and retailers or order 
direct from "Knitting Book Dept.", Alexandria Spinning 
Mills, 30 Grosvenor St., Sydney. Price 7^d. (posted 9d). 
Frock or Children s Wear Books 1/ld. (posted l/2}d.) 



SHRINKPROOF 



Sun.rfk.Kja,,, 





K N I TT 
WOOL 



N G 



Made in Australia by F. W. HUGHES 
PTY. LTD. at their Alexandria Spin 
ning Mills. Distributors: PATERSON, 
LAING d BRUCE LTD. 



SUN-GLO STYLES FREE! 

Alexandria Spinning Mill* Dept. E.572 

30 Grosvenor St., Sydney. 

Please send me FREE illustrated faldfr of Sun-glo styles. I enclose l$d. 
in stamps for postage. 

NAME. . ; 

ADDRESS 



SG57 



Treasure your SILVER 

POLISH IT THE 
KINDLIEST WAY 



Such a lovely possession 
deserves the best of care ! 
Tarnish and marring stains 
vanish with the safe and 
gentle kiss of Silvo . . . foi 
Silvo revives theenchantinu 
glow borne by new silver 



Silvo 

LIQUID SILVER POLISH 




Traffic is where you sit in your car and 
watch the pedestrians whiz by. 



To keep a clothes prop on my wire 
clothesline from slipping I place a clothes 
pin on each side of the prop. It will stay 
nut this wav. M.C. 



What people say behind your back is 

your standing in the community. . 



A careful driver approached a railroad: 
he stopped, looked and lis tened. All he 
heard was the car behind him crashing 
into his petrol tank. 




BRITISH-MADE 

BEBARFALD-VICKERS 
BUREAU SEWING MACHINES 



A truly magnificent 
machine. The English Vickers Head 
pews both backwards and forwards. 
Other special features include Auto 
matic Bobbin Winder, Stitch Adjuster 
and Tension Control. Handsome 
Bureau Cabinet, as illustrated, in light 
Maple colour. 

--- CUT AND MAIL THIS COUPON - 
BEBARFALDS LTD., 
Cnr. George & Park Stt., SYD\EY 
Please forward full details of the "Bebarfald- 
Vicktrs" Bureau Sewing Machine, with detail* 
of your Specialised Easy Terms. 



ADDRESS. 



-...A.H.J.39. 



BEBARFALDS 

OPPOSITE SYDNEY TOWN HALL 



Make 

baby s 

hair 




If far from town send postal note or 
stamps to Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney. 



BUNIONS 



Amazing New Appliance (worn at 
night). Quickly Banishes Bunions 
by removing the cause. Sent 
en Trial! Send Outline of 
Foot and 2$d. stamp for 
Postage of Literature. 
G. Primsett Appliance Co., 
10 Rawion Place, Sydney. 




Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



BROTHERLY WARMTH 

Eight and ten-year-olds will appreciate a pullover each with different necklines 

according to individual taste. 
The V-neck pullover is knitted in a zigzag cable, the round-nock one in a cable rib. 



For Round-neck Pullover 

Materials: 6 07,s. 3-ply wool; a pair each 
of No. 9 and No. 12 knitting needles; a 
spare needle pointed both ends for cabling. 

Measurements: Length from shoulder, 
1G ins.; to fit up to a 27-in. chest measure 
ment; sleeve seam, 13 ins. 

Tension: 8 sts. and 10 rows to 1 in. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; sts., 
stitches; rep., repeat; tog., together; inc., 
increase; dec., decrease; patt., pattern; 
beg., beginning; ins., inches. 
Back. 

With No. 12 needles cast on 107 sts. and 
work 3i ins. in k. 1, p. 1 rib. Change to 
No. 9 needles and the patt. as follows: 
1st row P. 3, * k. 1, p. 1, k. 1, p. 1, k. 1, 
p. 3; rep. from * to end. 2nd row K. 3 * 
rib 5, k. 3; rep. from * to end. Eep. these 2 
rows twice more. 

7th row P. 3, * slip next 3 sts. on to 
spare needle, twist them back to front and 
k. the first at., p. the second st. and k. the 
third st., slip next 2 sts. on to spare needle, 
twist them back to front, p. the first st. 
and k. the second st., p. 3; rep. from * to 
end. 8th row As 2nd. 

These 8 rows form one patt. Continue in 
patt. until work measures 11 ins. from 
beg. 

Armhole Shaping: Cast off 8 sts. at beg. 
of next 2 rows, dec. 1 st. at both end? of 
next 4 rows then dec. 1 st. at both ends 
of next 4 alternate rows. Continue with 
out shaping until work measures 16J ins. 
from beg. 




Shoulder Shaping: Cast off 5 sta. at beg. 
of next 10 rows. Leave remaining ats. on 
a spare needle. 

Front. 

Work as given for back until armhole 
shaping has been completed, then continue 
without shaping until work measures 14$ 
ins. from beg, ending with a wrong side 
row. 

Neck Shaping: Next row Patt. 28, take 
2 tog., turn, leaving remaining sts. on a 
spare needle. Now dec. 1 st. at neck edge 
on next 4 alternate rows. Continue without 
shaping until work measures 16$ ins. from 
beg., ending at armhole edge. 

Shoulder Shaping: .Cast off 5 sts. at beg. 
of next row and next 4 alternate rows. 

With right side of work facing you, slip 
the first l,i sts. on to a spare needle, join 



wool to remaining sts. and work up this 
side to match first. 

Sleeves. 

Begin at the top. With No. 9 needles 
cast on 19 sts. and work in patt., but inc. 
1 st. at both ends of 3rd row and every 
following row until there are 59 sts., then 
inc. 1 st. at both ends of every alternate 
row until there are 77 sts. Work 5 rows 
on these sts., then dec. 1 st. at both ends 
of next row and every following 8th row 
until 55 sts. remain, after which dee. 1 at. 
at both ends of every 4th row until 45 sts. 
remain. 

Continue without shaping until work 
measures 11^ ins. from beg. Change to 
No. 12 needles and work 2 ins. in k. 1, p. 1 
rib. Cast off ribwise. 

Neck Band. 

Join right shoulder seam, then with 
right side of work facing you and using 
No. 12 needles pick up and k. 24 sts. along 
side edge "of neck, k. the 15 sts. from spare 
needle, pick up and k. 24 sts. along other 
side edge of neck, then k. the 25 sts. from 
back neck. Work 1 in. in k. 1, p. 1 rib. 
Cast off loosely ribwise. 

Making-iip. 

Press work lightly on wrong side. Join 
left shoulder seam, sew in sleeves, then 
sew up side and sleeve seams. 

V-neck Jersey 

Materials: 7 ozs. 3-ply wool; 1 pair each 
of No. 10 and No. 12 knitting needles; a 
spare needle pointed both ends for cabling. 



Measurements: Length from shoulder, 
17-J ins.; to fit up to a 30-in. chest measure- 
ment: sleeve seam, 16 ina. 

Tension: 8 sts. and 10 rows to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; ats., 
stitches; rep., repeat; tog., together; inc., 
increase; dec., decrease; patt., pattern; 
beg., beginning; ins., inches. 
Back. 

With No. 12 needles cast on 113 sts. and 
work 2 ins. in k. 1, p. 1 rib. Change to 
No. 10 needles an.l work in patt. as fol 
lows: 1st row K. 1, * si. next 2 sts. on to 
spare needle and leave in front of work, 
k. 2, then k. the 2 sts. from spare needle 
(cable front), k. 4; rep. from * to end. 
2nd and alternate rows P. 3rd row * K. 
3, cable front, k. 1: rep. from * to last st., 
k. 1. 5th row * K. 3, &1. next 2 sts. on to 
spare needle and leave at back of work, 
k. 2, then k. the 2 sts. from spare needle 
(cable back), k. 1; rep. from * to last st., 
k. 1. 

7th row K. 1, * cable back, k. 4; rep. 
from * to end. 8th row P. These 8 rows 
fo"m one patt. Continue in patt. until 
work measures 12 ins. from beg., ending 
with an 8th patt. row. 

Armhole Shaping: Cast off 8 sts. at beg. 
of -next 2 rows, then dec. 1 st. at beg. of 
every row until 91 sts. remain. Continue 
without shaping until work measures 17 
ins. from beg. 

Shoulder Shaping: Cast off 12 sts. at 
)>eg. of next 4 rows. Leave remaining sts. 
on a spare needle. 

Front. 

Work as given for back until work 
measures 12 ins. from beg., ending with an 
8th patt. row. 

Armhole and Neck Shaping: Next row 
Cast off 7, work until th?re are 48 sts. on 

[Turn, to page 38.] 




16 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 




INC 






FOUNDATION GARMENTS 

Incorporate me action back , an amazing new 
principle mat prevents riding-up ana gives per 
fect control witn ease of movement. Nu Back 
is the perfect foundation for all figures. 



FOUNDATIONS 



LIBERTY 




CORSETS AND 
BRASSIERES 

Give you the freedom as well as 
the figure of youth in a slim, 
smootn line of beauty from 
I!;;, bust to tbigb. Exquisite 

design and expert work 
manship combine to 
create corsets and 
brassieres ol 
extraordinary 
sk attractiveness 



FROM ALL LEADING STORES 



Australian Home Journal, April I, 1949. 



17 




Wool Jersey. 

Star of the new season s collection of velvety 
woollens produced by French fabric manu 
facturers, according to cable messages received 
by the Australian Wool Hoard, is wool jersey. 

It ranges from diaphanously fine weaves to 
others, weighty and solid as woven coatings, 
which make magnificent coats and can ever 
be used for the tailoring of men s suits. 
* Some of the jersey fabrics are being used 
for draped blouses, while many designers have 
made jumper shapes from woven materials, 
cutting them rather long to be worn outside 
a skirt. Finest wool crepes are in high favour 
for delicate lingerie blouses made with 
tucked bodices, with drawn-thread work out 
lining yokes and with long, softly-full 
sleeves. > 






awe 



11 



\ 



Evening Frock, 

7100 3s. 

f yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 38 ins. 



Evening Frock. 

7316 3s. 

7 | yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 38 ins. 



Ballerina 
Evening Frock, 

7315 3s. 
5| yds. 36 ins. wid 
Sizes 32, 34, 36 ins. 



Country Clothes. 

Rich tawny, autumn foliage colours pre 
dominate in the current collections of 
casual type or country clothes. The cos 
tumes stress individuality, which is 
achieved with the high coloured materials, 
including imported and domestic tweeds 
and the first fleeces of light weight, plus expert workman 
ship and great imagination of design. 

Among these first autumn fashions are the classic jacket 
and dress combines, a duet that looks like a specially designed 
ensemble, but either dress or jacket can be worn with other 
pieces in a wardrobe. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 



18 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 




Sportswear. 

Autumn sports fashions shown 
us by an exclusive house included 
active ski wear and riding habits. 
Important for skiing was an all- 
prey water-repellant gabardine 
suit. 

IJlue and white checked trous- 
were ensembled with blue 
weather - resistant cotton 
parka. 

Hiding habits ranged from 
formal blacks with silk top 
hat to matching trousers and 
jacket ensembles in soft 
blue. 



Interchangeable sportswear in 
cluded a guardsman stripe in 
brown and beige, shown Avith 
solid yellow. 

Several models wearing various 
combinations of the various pieces 
in the collection demonstrated 
possible individual treatment. 

Wool dresses topped with long 
jackets were described as two 
costumes in one because the 
dress could be worn alone and 
the jackets could be Avorn Avith 
other pieces in the wardrobe. 

Outstanding among these was 
an all-grey costume. 



Matron s Frock, 

7127 1s. 10d. 

7\ yds. 54 ins. wide, 

Sizes 34 to 48 ins. 



Coat and Hood, 
7310 1 S . 6d. 
J yds. 54 ins. wide 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Coat, 7142 1s. 6d. 
yds. 54 ins. wide 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 




Two-Piecer, 
7307 1s. 6d. 

. 31 yds. 

54 ins. wide. 
Skirt cut on bias. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 



Pnffern \ 4-/7 cvtrn 1 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



Brassiere and Scanties 

10,554 1s. 3d 
1 yds. 36 ins. 
Scanties on the 
Sizes 32 to 40 



wide, 
cros 
ins. 



Gown, 13,125 2s. 2d. 
| yds. 54 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Evening Slip, 

10,566 1s. 6d. 

4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Cut on bias. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Pyjamas, 

10,557 Is. 10d. 

4f yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Girl s Pyjamas, 

10,551 1s. 3d. 

4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 years. 




[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, ld. extra.] 



20 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



Cearn 




Vressmaking, 

Know the joy of cutting and making perfect 
fitting clothes. In quite a short time we can 
teach you thoroughly. 

DAY, EVENING AND 
POSTAL LESSONS 

Be sure of the best tuition. Our schools are 
known for our successful students and our 
methods endorsed by leading fashion houses. 

CALL, WRITE OR PHONE 
FOR FREE BOOKLET 



I MAIL COUPON TO NEAREST BRANCH ~ I 
I McCabe Academy, 

i Please send me, without obligation, your free i 
I Booklet about Dressmaking lessons for which 1 I 
| enclose 2Jd. stamp. | 

I 



Name 



Address 



Personal or Postal Tuition. 



I Personal or Postal 

McCABE ACADEMY of DRESSMAKING 

THE FOREMOST AND LARGEST SCHOOL OF FASHION. 
Sydney: Canberra House, 295 Elizabeth St. Box 2424. 

Melbourne: Manchester Unity Bldgs., Swanston and Collins Sts. Box 330C. 
Brisbane: Penny s Buildings, Adelaide St. Entrance. Box 1816W, G.P.O. 
Perth: National House. William St Box 482. 
Adelaide: Shell House. North Terrace. Box 5I9E. 
South Africa: Shakespeare House. Commission St., Johannesburg. P.O Box 5811. 





After that last 
rinse in BLUE 



Reckitt s 
Blue 



"Out of the blue comes the whitest wash 



Australian actor. Eon Eandell, plays the 
lead in "The Lone Wolf and His Lady," and 
has already been mentioned for headlines 
in other productions. 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer have started on 
a Technicolor version of "Eobinson Crusoe." 
Location is in the West Indies and Spencer 
Tracy will take the part of Crusoe. 




IN 3 MINUTES 




1. Apply Veet Cream straight 
from the tube. 

2. After 3 minutes wash off. 
Not a trace of hair remains. 

3. Skin is soft and smooth as 
if no ugly hair ever existed. 

This is what Veet Cream will do 
for you. It removes every trace 
of hair in three minutes. Skin 
is left velvety, smooth and white. 
No stubble or shadow shows. 
This dainty white cream gently 
dissolves away thus hair below the 
skin surface. It actually weakens, 
and thus checks new growth. Get 
a tube of Veet Cream to-day. 
Successful results guaranteed or 
money refunded. 

Veet Cream is available at all 
chemists 2/9 a tube. 




V.7A.IO 



Distributors: 

Commonwealth & Dominion 

Agencies Pty. Ltd. 
Box 2949, G.P.O., Sydney 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



21 



Costutae. Jewellery. 

Good is gold when it comes to cos 
tume jewellery this autumn Or to 
any costume accessories It s the day 
time choice for chunky flexible brace 
lets, big earrings, gold metal belts 
wonderful with the new spice tones. darl< suits, 
or the new pale neutrals. 

But it s all in how you do it. 

Coil a necklace about your throat, and clip on 
to it a shiny brooch 

Buckle a gold bracelet over a long tight sleeve 
or softly crushed gloves 

Wear a touch of gold on your handbag, about 
the crown of your cloche perhaps with a wisp 
of gold veiling 

For evening, gold goes to your feet, your hands. 
your head, and you make a fashion point of it 

Don t overdo but do use gold, in your own 
individual way, for shining emphasis, to make 
your costume carry your signature in gold. 



Pinafore Frock, 9062-1 s. 3d 

6 and 8 years. 

Blouse, 1 yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Frock, 1| yds 
36 ins. 



Frock, 9057 Is. 6d. 
16 to 18 years. 
32 inches Bust. 
Plain- 
Is yds. 54 ins. wide. 
| yds. 54 ms. Wide. 



Frock, 9053 1s. 3d. 

10 and 12 years. 
-s yds. 54 ins. wide. 





Coat and ( 
Hood. V 
9047 
1s. 3d. 
0, 12, 14 
years. 
3 yds. 
54 ins. wide. 



Wool for evening. 

FVom France comes the news 
that many designers are using 
wool in conjunction with 
glamorous silks for evening, 
and Maggy Rouff presents a 
fully-gathered white wool skirt 
with a tightly-fitting bodice of 
white ottoman, while Robert figuet 
uses a black wool mousseliire shawl 
to make the bodice of an evening 
gown with an immense skirt of tor- 
toiseshell-brown satin. 

Another effective dance frock from 
the same house has a full ankle- 
length skirt of black wool crepe 
matched by a fringed triangular 
kerchief knotted about bare should 
ers above a yellow ottoman bodice 
stretched with black lace. 



For Autumn. 

Featured colours include: Van Oo{ 
green ; Fitch Pine green , Venetii 
wine; Florentine purple, and a wi< 
range of tapestry shades Much me 
tioued fabrics include broadcloth, reg 
velvet, lustre satin, sheer wool wii 
chiffon. Metal cloths, described as coi 
ing back, are represented in silk co 
tumes as the formal dinner suit of sat 
with metal cloth blouse and the sho 
length gold lame dinner dress. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 

"Australian Home Journal." 407-409 Kent Street. Svdnev. N.S W PnstnPP nn enrh Pattern. 14-/T PYtrn 1 



22 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



Famous 
STAGE and RADIO Star 

4/lM 
S&/RK 

says: 

"Horlicks is the 1 
most nourishing 
food drink 
of all" 





Rehearsals, recordings and 
performances demand keen 
physical and mental energy. 
That is why Hilda Scurr drinks 
Horlicks during the day, and 
at night. 

Horlicks is a satisfying drink 
in every way. Its distinctive, 
delicious flavour comes from a 



PfiOTEM 




careful blend of fresh full-cream 
milk and the nutritive extracts of 
malted^ barley and wheat. It is 
Nature s flavour . . . that s why 
you never tire of it. 

And Horlicks is rich in the vital 
food values you need every day. 
Horlicks will build you up, nour 
ish body and nerves, induce deep, 
restful sleep and guard against 
"Night Starvation". Equally deli 
cious hot or cold. 

Ask your storekeeper for 

HORLICKS 




16-02 tin 

3/6 



8-oz. fin 

2 2 



"During strenuous rehearsals, when I 
feel I need something to give me new 
life and energy, I always have a 
Horlicks," says Hilda Scurr. 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



23 



Overcoat, 9986 1s. 3d. 

6, 8, 10, 12 years. 
2 yds. 54 ins. wide. 




Plain Tweeds. 

While the fashion for boldly 
patterned and coloured tweeds is 
expected to take a leap upward in 
popularity, plain tweeds are ex 
pected to continue in pood stand 
ing, providing they are given new 
promotional interest through new 
dyes. 

While gay colours are promised 
an important play, also expect to 
see muted pastels again making 
headline news. 

Indicated for special promotion 
will he the mauvy pinks and hlues, 
the wood rose tones, the rosy beiges 
and the pale yellows. 



Lightweight wool looks especially 
salable in oatmeal and in goldenrod 
yellow. Special mention should go to 
the white which recurs in half-and-half 
colour effects ns well as background 
for gay prints. White wool jersey 
scores with geometric scroll of greeji. 

Tartans and Plaids. 

You cannot go wrong with tartans 
and plaids for all classes of children s 
wear. 



Safari Suit, 
9068 1s. 3d. 
4, 6, 8, 10 years. 
Jacket : 

1 yds. 54 ins. wide j 
Pants: - 

f yd. 54 ins. wide, ^p 




Cape and Hood, 
9977 1s. 3d. 
2, 4, 6, 8 years. 

1| yds. 54 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9061 1s. 3d. 

6 and 8 years. 
1| yds. 54 ins. wide. 




It was thought this coming winter 
that plaids would have outstayed their 
popularity, but the demand seems to 
be greater than ever. 

They can be worn as an allover dress 
or separately as a blouse or skirt with 
contrast garments. 

Taken all in all for the children it 
will be a particularly bright and colour 
ful season. Whether you stick to checks 
or not you can employ the most striking 
colours and tones for dresses for the 
wee mites and toddlers. So strike out 
for striking colours! 




Checks. 

Checks are also scheduled for 
more than usual attention be 
cause designers want them to 
look new and exciting. They do 
not care for any houndstooth 
checks, of which there was an 
abundance during the war years. 
However, they will take the 
houndstooth in new arrange 
ments, as seen in the hounds- 
tooth stripe of this season pro 
moted by one house. Colours 
will be largely depended 
upon to give new life 
and interest to checks 
of classic character. 

Among colour com 
binations are the mauve 
rose tones with grape- 
tones or black, the 
vibrant blues with blue- 
purples, and possibly 
wine for accent. 



Frock, 9993 1s. 3d. 

1 to 2 years. 
1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 



24 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



Coat, 9056 1s. 3d. 

2 and 4 years. 
1| yds. 54 ins. wide. 




Frock, 9066 1s. 3d. 
2 and 4 years 

1f yds. 

36 ins. wide 

Contrast : 

> yd-. 

36 ins. wide. 




Suit, 9984 1s. 3d 

2, 4, 6, 8 years 

Shirt, 1| yds. 

36 ins. wide. 

Pants, 1 yd. 

36 ins. wide, 



Flares Prominent, ^^ 

Flares are prominent and ive 
a new promotional slant to simple 
autumn dresses. [ s li m skirts I 
which really predominate at a 
number of stores, the excitement 
is m border treatments either 
effected by black skirt and used 

J nder very long, printed torso; or 
horizontal stripes in sharp con 
trast to vertical stripes of d r( >ss 
Hie latter is shown in slonder- 
iookmg skirt with front gatlu 
Diving subtle release. 

Stripe themes promise , 
carry on as importantly as ev f 
with a further develop 
ment of the bolder effects 
seen as necessary with the 
wider promotion of tweeds 
for country living. This 
idea of broad stripes has 
already taken hold in a 
significant way this 

season, especially in 

combinations of colours 
a neutral. 



Frock, 9992 1 S . 3d. 

1 to 2 years. 
1J;yds. 36 ins. wide. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W 





Hand-knitted Woollens. 

Keen interest among French 
women in Britain s Royal baby has 
inspired many attractive displays at 
shops specialising in children s wear 
and, from these, it is obvious that 
vvool is the predominant material, 
while hand-knitted woollies are the 
most popular. Incidentally, the 
influence of grown-up fashions on 
clothes for the young is marked, too, 
Among the most attractive little 
garments are frock and romper sets 
knitted in white wool and often 
decorated with Fair Isle patterns 
instead of embroidery. White with 
blue designs are in high favour, many 
of them recalling the elaborate pat 
terns on grown-up evening dresses, 
while animal designs borrowed from 
classic nursery rhymes are popular, 
too. Cosy shawls with hoods, 
knitted in fine Shetland wool 
in two layers, one white and 
the other in pink, are made 
up so that they can be used 
alternatively on the white 
and the pink side, states a 
special message received by 
the Australian Wool. Board. 



Overcoat, 9987 1 S . 3d 

2 and 4 years. 
H yds. 54 ins. wide, 
m postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



25 









- , X 

15^- 



S3fctfsft-* 





Lasting Beauty 

/or Lovely Hair 

For children and adults there is 
nothing more beneficial to the 
hair than regular care with 
Barry s Tri-coph-erous. This treat 
ment helps prevent falling hair, 
dandruff, premature greyness, 
brittle hair and itching scalp. 

BARRY S B6 87 

Tri-coph-erous 

FAMOUS HAIR TONIC 
Sold by all Chemists & Stores 




Just as the name Paul Storr stands for excellence in 
silver craftsmanship, so the name Goddard s stands 
for excellence in silver polishes. Australian house 
wives will welcome the return of these fine polishes 
to restore the beauty of their silverware. 



Goddard s Silver Polishes 



Plate Powder 



Silver Polish 



Silver Cloths 




26 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 




"The Velvet Touch," Century. 



other artist of note. Andre 
Martin, the man with the 
dancing fingers, comes 
from Paris. Joey Porter 
returns with another 
Australian act that has 
won fame abroad for the 
past eleven years. 

* * * 

In "Silver River," at 
the Regent, Mike Mc- 
Comb (Errol Flynn), 
cashiered from the Union 
Army, turns riverboat 
gambler. Aboard a steam 
boat, plying his trade, he 
meets Georgia Moore 
(Ann Sheridan), whose 
husband (Bruce Bennett) 
owns the Silver River 
mine. Flynn opens a 
gaudy gambling establish 
ment close by in Silver 
City. He is soon the rul 
ing gambler and banker 
of the town, and has now 



The Ploy and Film 

oQo oQ-o 

New acts at the Tivoli 
"Starry Nights" revue in 
troduce eight overseas 
variety turns. Foremost of 
the newcomers is Maurice 
Colleano, with Joyce, 
George and Lyn Colleano, 
in a comedy dancing acro 
batic specialty. The special 
engagement of the world- 
famous recording piano 
duetists, Ivor Morton and 
Dave Kaye, is sure to prove 
popular with Tivoli patrons. 
Tod Hilton, romantic bari 
tone, returns to his native 
home after a successful 





/red and bally tiartnell, Tivoli. 
tour abroad, especially with the 
B.B.C. The Juvelys, from U.S.A., 
provide balancing feats extraordin 
ary; while Elise Bower, with Jas 
mine, present songs and music. 
English comedian, Oliver Wake- 
field, who has won fame on radio 
and gramophone recordings, is an- 



"The Search," Liberty. 

fallen madly in love with Ann. 
When her husband is killed by the 
Indians, Flynn, now a full-scale 
robber-baron, appears and asks her 
to marry him. He builds a man 
sion for Ann nearby the town and 
is apparently happy as a married 
man. But his old enemies set out 
to wreck his empire. There isv a 
run on Flynn s bank. . Disaster piles 
up, and Ann leaves him suddenly 
when she hears whispers that Flynn 
was responsible for her husband s 
death. After all that Flynn de 
cides to become a good boy and 
the ending is quite satisfactory. 
* * 

"Miss Tatlock s Millions," at the 
Prince Edward, is a complicated 
story of intrigue and deception. A 
movie stunt man is persuaded to 
impersonate a feeble-minded old 
gentlem an whose presence is re 
quired at the reading of the Tat- 
lock will. A guardian who does 
not want to lose a lucrative job 
arranges the imposture. All the 
expectant beneficiaries are present 
and they are shocked when they 
find the old lady has left everything to the totter 
ing old man. There are plots and counter plots 
and much heartburnings and disappointments. But 
the showdown is a knockout when the impersona 
tor is exposed and the real heir arrives on the 
scene with his Hawaiian wife and children! In 
the cast: John Lund, Wanda Hendrix, Barry 



Fitzgerald, Monty Woolley, Ilka Chase, 

Robert Stack, Dorothy Stickney. 

* * * 

Both in Hollywood and England the 
movie business has fallen on evil times. 
America is bemoaning the drop in attend 
ances something like 20 per cent. Also, the 
publicity some stars are receiving is far 
from being of a satisfactory character. 
The last thing film magnates want is con 
duct on the part of stars that brings them 
in contact with the law or visualises them 
in an undesirable light. As one executive 
put it: "Wrong publicity kills glamour. 
We do not want that, but we seem to be 

getting more than our share." 

* * 

In Great Britain the Rank organisation 
has made itself unpopular because it has 
eut down drastically on expensive produc 
tions. No longer will there be those mass 
ive, spectacular films in which many hun 
dreds of individuals engage in combat, 
fitted out regardless of cost in specially 
made old-time costumes. It has been dis 
covered at last that lavish monumental 
affairs are mostly a flop from the box office 
viewpoint. And so there is 
a return to simplicity, 
where painted back sheets 
may take the place of out 
door fixings. In travel ex 
penses alone this will save 
thousands of pounds. After 
all, it is the work of the 
producer and the actors 
that sell a picture. If these 
are not up to standard, all 
the costly locations, plus 
hundreds of supernumeraries 
and advertising ballyhoo, 
are as nothing. 



"Annie, Get Your Gun," 
at the Theatre Royal, ia 
still playing to quantity 
houses and there is no talk 
yet about a successor to the 
lady who bemoans the fact 




Miss Tatlock s Millions," Prince Edward. 
that you can t get a man with a gun. The 
musical comedy moves along briskly and 
is likely to do so for months ahead. Songs 
and ensembles follow each other in quick 
succession. Principals: Evie Hayes as 
"Annie Oakley", with Webb Tilton as 
"Frank Butler." 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



27 




Bacall s assignment is a more 
sympathetic one than usual, as 
she depicts a serious-minded 
young lady here, instead of the 
sultry, enchantress. Bogart is 
cast as an escaped convict from 
San Quentin who tries to prove 
his innocence. All of this is shot 
in and near San Francisco. The 
Golden Gate Bridge figures pro 
minently in the action and the 
camera makes wide use of this 
engineering structure to motivate 
the more exciting moments in the 

picture. 

* # * 

"The Luck of the Irish," starring 
Tyrone Power and Anne Baxter, at 
the Mayfair, is acclaimed as one 
of the funniest pictures of the 
year. The film unfolds the story 
of the strange and hilarious com 
plications that fill the life of an 
American foreign correspondent 




Fred Hilton, Tivoli. 

If all battles were like the ones 
fought by Red Skelton in "A Southern 
Yankee," at St. James , wars would be 
a pleasure! Bed is a howling travesty 
of Aubrey Filmore, a bungling and 
blundering bellhop, determined to be 
come a member of the Union s Secret 
Service and to track down the South s 
most dangerous and elusive spy, the 
Grey Spider. When circumstances en 
tirely beyond his control enable Aubrey 
to capture the Grey Spider in a St. 
Louis hotel bedroom, the Secret Service 
is forced against its will to enlist the 
aid of Aubrey and, disguised as the 
Spider, he is sent on a mission to Con 
federate headquarters. The devious 
means by which he crosses the Confed 
erate lines in the midst of roaring cross- 





"Silver River," Regent. 

upon his return to New York from 
Ireland where he had a brief 
romance with a comely colleen, 
and stumbled across a sly old gent 
who takes the romance in hand 
and sends it on a dizzy course. 
Power is Stephen Fitzgerald, the 
reporter, while Miss Baxter is 
Nora, the Irish girl 
who chased after her 
heart and found it 
being given the run- 
around in a New York 
subway. Others in the 
cast: Cecil Kellaway, 
Lee J. Cobb, James 
Todd, Jayne Meadows, 
J. M. Kerrigan, Phil 
Brown and Charles 
I r win. 



A Southern Yankee," St. James. 

and a very beautiful 
one. To Paul s astonish 
ment, she calmly proposes 
that she will show him 
how to return to the shore 
if he will take her to 
London. The doctor takes 
her to London as an in 
valid in a wheelchair; she 
surprises everyone with 
her beauty and charm. 
There are plenty of em- 
barrassing moments when 
the doctor s wife doubts 
tLe bona fides of the in 
valid. A first rate comedy, 
breaking entirely new 
ground, full of laughs and 
comical situations. Pre 
posterous, perhaps, but 
you ll enjoy it. 

* * 

"Station West," at the Palace, offers a 
realistic story of conflict between an Army 
investigator and outlaws led by an allur 
ing gambling queen in a wild western 
town. The town is under control of one 
"Charlie," who turns out to be also the 
beautiful singer in the dance hall. She 
rules through Prince, a gambler, and Mick, 



" Miranda," Embassy. 

fire, his uproarious experiences in an 
evacuation hospital where he is mistaken 
for a victim of shell shock, the ruses by 
which he makes himself out to be the 
greatest hero of the Civil War to an admir 
ing Southern belle, and his final expose 
under hilarious circumstances, make for 
original and uproarious comedy. 

* * * 

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall are 
cast together in Warner Bros. dramatic 
"Dark Passage," at the Plaza. This is an 
action-packed screen version of the David 
Goodis novel of the same name. In sup 
port of the leading duo are: Agnes Moore- 
licad, Bruce Bennett, Tom D Andrea, Clif 
ton Young and Rory Mallinson. Miss 



Can you imagine for 
a moment the sensational ex 
perience of a Harley Street 
doctor on a holiday at a fish 
ing village, as disclosed by 
"Miranda." at the Embassy? 
Thinking he has a large catch, 
he drags in the line, only to 
find the bait gone. He re-baits 
and casts again. Suddenly two 
beautiful arms appear, tug the line, 
and he falls overboard. Miranda seizes 
him by the legs and swims away with him. 
Paul recovers consciousness in the mer 
maid s cave. He is shocked and bewildered 
by the sight of the half-fish, half-human 
creature. Miranda is a real live mermaid 




"My Own True Love," Victory. 
a burly bouncer. Stressing strongly etched 
characters and suspenseful gun duels, the 
action rolls up to a fine climax. Dick 
Powell has another hard-bitten hero role, 
while Jane Greer plays the exotic woman 
on the other side of the law, but not 
[Turn to page 36.] 



28 



Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



SUPPORT FOR 
GOVERNMENT 
LOANS 




help provide 

the 

in pr policy 





If you are the owner of a life assurance policy you 
probably enjoy benefits not guaranteed in your con 
tract . . . the "plus" of added bonuses. These arise 
because your Life Office invests your savings in a wide 
range of community services. The interest earned, 
coupled with the fact that costs of iJfe assurance 
management in Australia are the lowest in the world, 
ensures that you receive that welcome "plus" in 
your policy . . . the benefit of added bonuses. 

THREE MILLION POLICYHOLDERS, SEVEN AND A HALF 
MILLION AUSTRALIANS, MATERIALLY BENEFIT THROUGH 

LIFE ASSURANCE 

ISSUED BY THE LEADING LIFE ASSURANCE OFFICES N AUSTRALIA 

2/169 



family 
loves that 

s/ivor 

flavour 



You haven t tasted reo/ 
spaghetti or macaroni until 
you try SAVOY . . . made in 
the true Continental style . . . 
tasty, tempting, delicious and 
nutritious. Always ask for 
SAVOY by name. 



MACARONI 
SPAGHETTI 




SAVOY NUTRIFOODS PTY. LTD., 
20 George St., Leichhardt, N.S.W., LM5602 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



29 



THE ROSE JUMPER 



-o-o-iH-l-o-o- 



There is something entirely different in 
the way of colour being introduced into a 
jumper, as this rose looks like a piece of 
old tapestry worked in three shades of rose 
and two of green. The coloured wools may 
be carried across the back, or short pieces 
of each colour being knitted in, darning 
the ends in neatly at back of work when 
finished. 

Materials: 8 ozs. brown 3-ply crepe wool; 
^ oz. each of dark rose, vieux rose, pink, 
dark green, light green, and a short length 
of white; 2 small press studs; 2 bone knit 
ting needles No. 12 and 2 No. 10. 

Measurements: Length from shoulder, 18 
inches; bust, 32 inches; sleeve, 6^ inches. 

Abbreviations: k., knit; p., purl; sts., 

stitches; tog., together; DR., dark rose; 

VR., vieux rose; P., pink; W., white; LG., 

light green; DG., dark green; B., brown. 

Back. 

Cast on 100 sts. with brown wool on No. 
12 needles and work in a ribbing of k. 1, 
p. 1 for 3 inches. Change to No. 10 
needles and work in stocking-st., increas 
ing 1 st. at both ends of the needle in the 
10th and every following 6th row until 
there are 106 sts.; then work as follows: 



Row 1 k. 1, * k. 2 tog.; repeat from * 
to last st., k. 1. 

Row 2 k. 1, * k. 1; then k. the loop 
before the next st.; repeat from * to last 
st., k. 1. 

Row 3 Knit. 

Row 4 Purl. 

Repeat these 4 rows on-3, then 4 rows in 
stocking-st., remembering to increase at 
both ends of every 6th row. 

Repeat these 12 rows until you have five 
rows of insertion pattern and 120 sts. on 
the needle. Continue in stocking-st. for 
8 more rows; then shape armholes as fol 
lows: Cast off 6 sts. at beginning of next 
2 rows; then k. 2 tog. at both ends of the 
needle every 2nd row until there are 96 
sts. Continue on these 96 sts. for 2 inches, 
then divide for back opening as follows: 
* k. 48 turn, k. 3, p. to end of row; repeat 
from * until armhole is 6| inches (measure 
on the straight); then cast off 6 sts. when 
beginning each row at armhole edge 5 
times (30 sts.). Cast off remaining sts. for 
back of neck. Return to centre of back 
opening and cast on 3 sts., and knit to end 
of row. Work on these sts. to match side 
just completed. 





Front. 

Cast on 100 sta. 
and work exactly as 
given for back to 
armhole; then as fol 
lows: 

Row 1 Cast off 6 
sts., k. to end of row. 

Row 2 Cast off 6 
Bts., p. to end of row. 




Row 3 k. 2 tog., k. 77 B., 2 LG., 25 B., 
k. 2 tog. 

Row 4 p. 26 B., 2 LG.. 2 DG., 6 B., 1 
LG., 27 B., 3 DG., 5 B., 1 DG., 33 B. 

Row 5 k. 2 tog., k. 28 B., 2 DG., 1 B., 
1 DG., 4 B., 2 Dj}., 2 LG., 26 B., 1 DG., 
1 LG., 5 B., 2 DG., 3 LG., 23 B., k. 2 tog. 

Row 6 p. 25 B., 3 LG., 3 DG., 3 B., 2 
LG., 2 DG., 25 B., 2 LG., 3 DG., 3 B., 
3 DG., 30 B. 

Row 7 k. 2 tog., k. 29 B., 2 Dfi., 2 B., 

3 DG., 3 LG., 24 B., 3 DG., 3 iG., 1 B., 

4 DG., 3LG., 23 B., k. 2 tog. 

Row 8 p. 24 B., 4 LG., 3 DG., 4 LG., 
4 DG., 23 B., 4 DG., 2 LG., 1 B., 2 DG., 
31 B. 

Row 9 k. 2 tog., k. 29 P., 3 DG., 2 LG., 

4 DG., 21 B., 4 DG., 4 LG., 3 DG., 4 LG., 24 
B., k. 2 tog. 

Row 10 p. Z6 B., 6 DG., 4 LG., 3 DG., 
25 B., ] DG., 2 LG., 2 DG., 1 B., 1 DG., 

5 LG., 24 B. 

Row 11 k. 2 tog., k. 21 B., 5 LG., 2 DG., 

1 B., 2 DG., 1 LG., 11 B.. 1 VR., 2 DR., 

2 VR., 3 B., 2 DR, 3 VR., 3 B., 2 DG., 
4 LG.. 1 DG., 1 B., 3 LG., 26 B., k. 2 tog. B. 

Row 12 P. 32 B., 1 DG., 3 LG., 1 DG., 
2 B., 2 VR., 6 DR.. 1 B., 1 P., 1 VR., 4 DR., 
11 B., 2 DG., 2 B., 1 DG., 1 B., 1 DG., 
4 LG., 22 B. 

Row 13 k. 2 tog., 19 B., 4 LG., 2 DG., 
1 B., 1 DG., 1 B., 1 DG., 9 B., 4 VR., 3 DR., 
4 P., 1 VR., 6 P., 1 VR., 3 B., 1 DG., 2 LG., 

1 B., 5 DG., 25 B., k. 2 tog. 

Row 14 p. 25 B., 6 DG., 1 LG., 1 B., 

2 DG., 2 B., 2 VR., 8 P., 3 VR., 1 P., 5 DR., 

3 VR., 2 B.. 4 LG., 2 B., 2 DG., 2 B., 3 DG., 
2 LG., 18 B. 

Row 15 k. 18 B., 5 LG., 1 DG., 1 B., 
2 DG., 1 B., 2" DG., 3 LG., 1 B., 2 VR., 

2 DR., 5 P., 2 VR., 1 P.. 1 W., 2 DR., 1 P., 

3 VR., 1 DR., 2 VR., 3 P., 1 DG., 2 B.. 
3 LG., 6 DG., 25 B. 

Row 16 p. 25 B., 4 DG., 5 LG., 3 B., 
1 P., 1 VR., 1 DR.. 2 W., 2 P., 1 VR., 3 DR., 

1 W., 3 P., 1 DR., 1 VR., 5 P., 2 DR., 2 VR , 

3 DG., 2 LG., 4 B., 5 LG., 19 B. 

Row 17 k. 26 B., 1 DG., 1 B., 3 LG., 

2 DG., 1 P., 1 VR., 1 DR.. 6 P., 1 DR., 4 P., 

1 W., 3 DR., 1 VR., 3 P., 1 W., 2 DR., 

4 DG., 1 B., 5 LG., 3 DG., 25 B. 

Row 18 p. 25 B\, 6 LG., ^2 B., 5 DG., 

2 W., 1 P., 2 VR., 2 DR., 3 VR., 2 W., 
2 P., 2 DR., 1 VR., 2 DR., 2 P., 2 VR., 

1 LG., 1 DG., 2 B., 



1 P., 1 VR., 2 DG., 
1 DG., 26 B. 



[Turn to page 31.1 



30 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



SPEED BATHROOM CLEANING 




So fine . . . will not scratch! Play safe 
with the shiny "new" look of your bath 
and sink. Fine, white Bon Ami cleans 
without grit. No dirt-catching scratches. 
No hard ruhbing. No red, rough hands. 

So fast . . . polishes as it cleans! You 

save time with Bon Ami because you get 



Bon Ami 



a polish as you clean. And the shine lasts 
longer, too. That s why Bon Ami s better 
for windows, also. It s so easy. Wipe on. 
Wipe off. And what a sparkle it leaves! 
Buy either Bon Ami 
Cake or Bon Ami Pow 
der. Start cleaning to 
day the safe, easy way! 



POWDER 
and CAKE 




BUM 




^> THE SPEEDY CLEANSER that 




Houstk 



*a 




Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



31 



THE ROSE JUMPER 

{From page 29.] 
Row 19 k. 26 B., 1 DG., 2 B., 4 DG., 

1 B., 1 VR., 1 P., 3 VR., 1 DR., 2 VR.. 1 
DR., 2 P./ 1 W., 2 DR.. 3 VR., 1 P., 2 DR., 

2 P., 2 W., 5 DG., 32 B. 

Row 20 p. 33 B., 4 DG., 1 W., 3 P., 
2 VR., 1 DR., 1 W., 3 P., 2 DR., 1 VR., 
2 W., 2 P., 1 DR., 1 VR., 1 DR., 2 VR., 
1 P, 1 VR., 2 B., 3 DG., 2 B., 1 DG., 26 B. 

Row 21 k. 26 B., 1 LG., 3 B., 2 DG., 
1 B., 3 VR,, 6 DR., 1 VR., 1 W., 3 VR., 

1 DR., 3 P., 2 W., 1 DR., 5 P., 1 W., 2 
DG., 34 B. 

Row 22 p. 38 B., 3 P., 2 VR., 1 DR., 

2 P., 7 VR., 1 W., 2 P., 2 DR., 1 VR., 

3 DR., 2 VR., <5 B., 1 DG., 26 B. 

Row 23 k. 26 B., 1 DG., 5 B., 2 VR., 

2 DR., 2 VR., 2 DR., 2 P., 2 DR., 1 P., 

3 VR., 3 W., 2 P., 1 DR., 3 P., 39 B. 
Row 24 p. 42 B., 1 W., 2 P., 1 W., 5 P., 

3 DR., 1 W., 2 P., 1 DR., 3 VR., 2 DR., 
2 VR., 4 B., 1 DG., 11 B., 3 DG., 22 B. 

Row 25 k. 20 B., 5 DG., 1 B., 1 G., 4 B,, 
2 VR., 3 DR., 2 VR., 1 DR., 2 P., 1 W., 

2 VR., 1 DR., 1 P., 2 DR., 1 VR., 1 P., 
1 W., 3 P., 1 W., 41 B. 

Row 26 p. 40 B., 1 W., 3 P., 2 VR., 

1 P., 1 VR., 2 DR., 1 P., 2 DR., 1 P., 2 DR., 

3 P., 3 VR., 2 DR., 2 VR., 3 B., 1 DG., 1 B., 

3 LG., 3 DG., 19 B. 

Row 27 k. 18 B., 3 DG., 5 LG., 1 B., 

2 LG., 5 P., 4 VR., 3 P., 2 DR., 2 VR., 
2 P., 2 W., 2 VR., 5 P., 40 B. 

Row 28 p. 41 B., 1 DG., 8 P., 1 VR.. 
2 P., 1 VR., 1 DR., 1 P., 5 VR., 2 B., 2 P., 

4 LG., 1 B., 4 LG., 5 DG., 17 B. 

Row 29 k. 17 B., 4 DG., 5 LG., 1 B., 

2 DG., 4 LG., 2 B., 1 VR., 2 P., 2 VR., 3 P., 
1 DR., 4 P., 1 W., 1 B., 3 P., 1 B., 1 DG., 
41 B. 

Row 30 p. 41 B., 1 DG., 5 B., 3 W., 

1 P., 2 VR., 3 P., 1 VR., 1 W., 3 P., 1 B., 

4 LG., 3 DG., 2 B., 6 LG., 2 DG., 17 B. 
Row 31 k. 17 B., 1 DG., 2 B., 3 LG., 

3 B., 3 DG., 5 LG., 1 B., 3 P., 1 W., 2 DG., 

5 P., 1 DR., 1 P., 3 DG., 4 B., 1 DG., 1 B., 
8 DG., 31 B. 

Row 32 p. 29 B., 1 DG., 2 B., 2 DG., 

4 DR., 2 DG., 3 B., 5 DG., 1 B., 4 P., 2 B., 
3 DG., 2 W., 2 P., 4 LG., 4 DG., 2 B., 
3 DG., 21 B. 

Row 33 k. 20 B., 3 DG., 3 LG., 2 B., 

2 DG., 2 LG., 3 B., 2 DG., 5 LG., 1 B., 

3 P., 2 B., 5 DG., 3 B., 3 DG., 3 DR., 
2 VR., 2 DG., 30 B. 

Row 34 p. 31B., 3 VR., 2 DR., 2 LG., 

2 DG., 4 B., 4 DG., 1 LG., 4 B., 3 LG., 

3 DG., 6 B., 1 LG., 1 DG., 2 B., 3 LG., 
3 DG., 21 B. 

Row 35 k. 21 B., 2 DG., 4 LG., 11 B., 
2 DG., 2 LG., 6 B., 3 DG., 5 B., 5 LG., 

1 P., 4 VR., 30 B. 

Row 36 p. 31 B., 1 VR., 3 P., 2 LG., 

2 DG., 7 B., 1 DG., 8 B., 1 LG., 2 DG., 
12 B., 3 LG., 2 DG., 21 B. 

Row 37 k. 21 B., 1 DG., 2 LG., 14 B., 
1 DG., 1 LG., 18 B., 1 DG., 6 LG., 31 B. 

Row 38 p. 31 B., 1 LG., 6 B., 1 DG., 
17 B., 1 DG., 16 B., 1 DG., 22 B. 

Row 39 Knit in brown. 

Row 40 p.; continue now in brown 
only. 

Row 41 k. 35, cast off 26, k. 35. 

On the last 35 sts. continue working in 
stocking-st., decreasing 1 st. at neck edge 
every 2nd row until you have . 30 sts. 
Work without shaping until armhole is 
samp as back, then shape shoulder by cast 
ing off 6 sts. at armhole edge when begin 
ning each row until all are cast off. Return 
to remaining 35 sts. and work to match 
side just completed. 



Sleeves (both alike). 

Cast on 80 sts. with brown wool on No. 
12 needles and work in a ribbing of k. 1, 
p. 1 for 1 inch. Change to No. 10 needles 
and knit one row increasing to 88 sts., then 
purl back. 

Work in the pattern as given for back, 
commencing on the next row and increas 
ing at both "ends of the needle in the 6th 
and every following 6th row until there 
are 96 sts. When you have 5 rows of 
insertion pattern, work 8 rows of stocking- 
st., then shape top by casting off 4 sts. at 
beginning of next 2 rows; then k. 2 tog. 
at both ends of the needle every 2nd row 
until there are 66 sts., then both ends of 
the needle every 3rd row until there are 54 



sts., then at both ends of the needle every 
row until there are 24 sts. Cast off remain 
ing stitches loosely. 

To Make Up. 

Darn all ends in neatly if short lengths 
of wool have been used. Press carefully 
with a hot iron over a damp cloth. Sew up 
shoulder, side and sleeve seams. Sew in 
sleeves, placing seam at underarm. With 
No. 12 needles pick up and knit from 
wrong side of work 66 sts. from centre 
front round to back of neck to the border 
sts. Work in a ribbing of k. 1, p. 1 for 
22 rows and cast off loosely ribwise from 
wrong side. Work other half-collar the 
same. Sew on press studs. Buckram 
shoulder pads may be used if desired. 



SCARF MAGIC. 




What s in a scarf? Just so many ways 
to wear it. No scissors; just the way you 
fold the square. Sketched are a few sug 
gestions. A: The popular mammy style 
which, when folded as A, tie round head, 
leaving the double point XX falling over 
centre forehead. 

Bring up the ends X and tie centre fore 
head, pull back t the double points and 
fasten over the tie with a brooch. B: Hold 
large square by its top corners, slip it 
beneath your back hair, knot corners at 
top, as Bl. Bring the other corners up 
and tie over the first knot. C: The snood 
effect. Hold large square by its top corners, 
slip it beneath your back hair, knot 
corners on top, as CB. Bring the other 



corners up over your head, twist into a 
firm roll (sketch C2). Lift the roll over 
original knot, fold the end under on top 
of your head. C3 shows how you fold ends 
loosely, instead of twisting up. 



A young matron was enjoying the atten 
tions of her dinner partner, a handsome 
Westerner. "But how old do you think I 
am?" she asked. 

"Shucks," he replied. "I don t know, 
ma am, but if I snw you on the street I d 
whistle first and estimate afterwards." 



There is good reason to hope that in a 
hundred years motoring, will have become 
so fatal a pursuit that it will have been 
prohibited as a criminal occupation. 

In courtship a man pursues a woman 
until she catches him! 



32 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 




JwQ js use ^i ^J 

FISHER S 

Polishing WAX 

FOR FLOORS, LINO S & FURNITURE 

For dark woods ask for FISHER S DARK STAIN (WAXTANE) 





0\ 



.<> 








Zebo works at top speed making grates and stoves gleaming black 
and clean. For quickness and ease ask your grocer for Zebo. 

LIQUID 
STOVE POLISH 

ALSO ZEBRA IN PASTE OR PACKETS 



^\ Overnight or while you dress 

^ "Steradent" cleans your Dentures 

" fc\ 



You can now clean your false 
teeth simply, merely by placing 
them in "Steradent" solution. 
Stains and film caused by smoking 
disappear every crevice is 

sterilized. 

"Steradent" is harmless to the 
materials of whkh dentures are 
usually made, including the new 
acrylic resins. 

Sold by Chemists only 



Steradent 



Reckitt & Colman (Aust.) Ltd., 
(Pharmaceutical Divn.) Sydney 

4102 




Dr. Evatt,- Minister for External Affairs, 
has been awarded tho Grand Cross of the 
Legion of Honour because of his services 
as President of the third General Assembly 



To clean a fountain pen, empty out the 
ink, then fill and empty the pen several 
times with a solution of vinegar and water. 
This will remove anything which is likely 
to clog up the tube. 



ARE YOU SLOWLY 
POISONING YOURSELF? 

Remove the Cause 



WHEN waste matter is 
to accumulate in the colon it has 
three effects. It weakens the 
muscular power of the body to 
remove it. It creates poisonous 
products which through the cir 
culation reach every cell in the 
body. It forms a breeding- 
ground for germs by the mil 
lions. That is the reason high 
authority to-day regards consti 
pation as primarily resnon^hle 
for eighty-five cases in every 
hundred of serious illness. Way 
sneHalist? all over the world 
have made Internal cleanness 
their slogan. 

Coloseptic overcomes the pos 
sibility of Autoxima from the 
words auto (self), toxin (poison) 
by inducing better Internal 
Cleanness. 

Coloseptic is the product of In 
tensive research to find a remedy 
which would combat constipa 
tion at its source, the colon 

A level teaspoonful in a glass 
of water morning or night, once 
or twice a week, is sufficient after 
perfect relief is obtained 

COLOSEPTIC 

FOR BETTER 
INTERNAL CLEANNESS 

At all chemists and stores 

333 



HAPPY 
T THING TIME/ 



for every babe in the safes), most natural 
way with Martin (, Pleasance Teethmg 
Powders 



They slop pain and restlessness. Keep 
motions gentle and regular, and the 
bloodstream cool. Provide Caloum for 
sound, healthy teeth. 
For over 80 ytan, Mothers everywhere 



have in.iislrd on 

MARTI N& PLEASANCE 



TEETHIWG / 
POWDfRS 1 6 



to Boys & Girls 




Wrist Watches, Cameras. Ma -Ma Do/is. 
Fountain Pens. Many other Valuable Prizes for 
se//ing sma// parcels of tested garden seeds. Send 
for parce/ and big catalogue of presents. Send no 
money now, only name and address. Write to-dap. 
i_i. n M..,,, A&1K George St. .Sydney 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



33 



STARRED WITH DAISIES 



Wear circlets of flowers and you ll look fresher than a meadow in the morning sun. 
A crocheted circle of piping cord makes each daisy. 

Daisy chains in the right setting can be as decorative 
as any jewel. These are simple and quick to make and 
they ll last longer than the ones you twined together 
as a child. 

Each daisy is made from piping cord worked into 
a circle of crochet. The leaves are tiny strips of felt. 
For the hairband and its matching bracelet 
you need 24 yards white piping cord of medium 
thickness; scraps of yellow material for the 
flower centres, a small square of green felt for 
the leaves, 6 inches of narrow elastic and a hook 
and eye, and a large crochet hook. 

Eight flower heads, graded in size, are 
joined to make the hairband. For the two 
centre flowers crochet a row of 12 chain with 
the piping cord, close into a circle with a slip- 
stitch, then work a row of slip-stitches into 
the chain round the circle; finish off by catcli- 
stitching the end underneath. For each pair 
of the smaller flowers reduce the chain to 11, 
10 and 8 stitches each. Cut circles 1^ inches 
in diameter from the yellow fabric for the 
flower centres. Gather round edge and pull 
up slightly and insert in centre of piping cord 
circles, gathers underneath. 

For the leaves cut four green felt strips 4 
inches by ^ inch, sloping the ends, and three 
strips 2 inches by f inch, pointing the ends. 
Join the edges of the flowers into a strip. 
Stitch a small leaf lengthwise between the 
centre flowers, oversewing the centre of felt 
to shape it. Cross larger leaf strips in pairs 
and sew a pair between flowers each side of 
centre. 

Sew last little leaves between last two 
flowers each side. Finish the flower band at 
each end with a felt strip If inches by inch 
and join into a circle by elastic. Cover the joins 
with a rosette of piping cord made by 6 chain 
and slip-stitches. For the bracelet work five flowers 
of 12 chain and cut two small and two large leaves. 
Join flowers together, cross large leaves and stitch 
cross at back of centre flower. Stitch small leaves 
between the end bracelet flowers. Fasten with a hook 
and eye. 




Salads for Health. 

Salads are Nature s tonics and beauty 
foods. They put a sparkle in the eyes, 
gloss on the hair and spring in the step. 
They re doubly important now; they have 
not only to play their own good part, but 
take the place of fruit as well. A salad 
a day should be your rule; a good big 
plateful, not just a finicky spoonful or so! 

All green vegetables, and young, tender 
root vegetables, are at home in the salad 
bowl. Cabbage is not just a winter sub 
stitute for lettuce, it s much richer than 
that conventional plant in vitamin C. Don t 
be afraid to experiment with salads. Test 
and taste it s worth it. 

For Vitamin A: The richest are spinach, 
cauliflower leaves and parsley. Carrots, 
of course, but you absorb more A when 
they re cooked, strangely enough! 

For Vitamin C: At least twice as good 
as oranges are cabbage, broccoli tops, 
parsley, kale, spinach, cauliflower (with 
the greon), watercress, mustard and cress. 
As good as oranges: turnips, tomatoes, 
s\vedes. Good, but not so good as oranges: 
lettuce, parsnips, potatoes. 

Of course, that doesn t exhaust the list 
of good salad ingredients. All others are 
good, and give you necessary vitamins and 
minerals. 



Tender leaves can be broken with the 
fingers, but avoid bruising or fine chopping 
or grating, as this destroys the vitamin C. 
Root vegetables can be diced, sliced, or 
cut in slivers with a potato peeler. No long 
soaking; the goodness seeps out. Wash as 
quickly as possible. Use as soon after 
buying or picking as possible, but if they 
must be kept, then wrap in a damp cloth 
and put into something airtight a sauce 
pan with the lid on will do. 

Salad as a main dish is refreshing, saves 
time, work and fuel. Include cold cooked 
potatoes and cheese grated or sliced, or 
cold diced meat, flaked fish, some sar 
dines, pilchards or salmon, cooked dried 
beans. If some members of the family 
insist on "something hot" begin with some 
hot soup. 



During the past six months Government 
employees increased by 10,400 to 559,300. 
Of the 10,400 new employees, 9,400 were 
men and 1,000 women. Somewhere we 
heard that with the end of the war and 
the elimination of wartime bureaucracies 
there would be less Government servants, 
and private employers would be able to 
get much-needed staff. That time is not 
yet. One in every four workers is now in 
Government employ. 



Eiderdown Cover. 

Usually a divan bed is used as a settee 
by day. So, what to do with the eider 
down? Why not make it into a bolster 
cushion? You can never have too many 
cushions on a divan. 

Firstly, fold the long sides of the eider 
down in half, roll the resulting double pad 
into a cylinder, and secure it loosely by 
two bands of elastic, as sketch C. Measure 
a piece of contrast matching or floral 
material to fit round packed eiderdown by 




measuring round, as X on sketch D shows; 
make a circle of material size of XX. 
Stitch one circular piece on and the other 
leave open, and add a zipp fastener round 
about three-quarter way, so you can slip 
eiderdown in easily, or add patent fasten 
ers, although zippers (large ones) are sold 
now at most stores. You will certainly be 
pleased with the result, as clearly shown in 
sketches A and B. 



An Old Russian Custom. 

If anyone is still so fatuously optimistic 
as to imagine that the peril to peace is 
exaggerated let him study the statement 
by Mr. Stalin, broadcast from Moscow. 

The Russian dictator accuses the Western 
Powers of precisely the double-dealing of 
which the Soviet Union is guilty. "They 
want, not agreement and co-operation, but 
talk about agreement and co-operation, in 
order to thwart agreement, to throw the 
blame on the U.S.S.R.," says Mr. Stalin. 
Substitute "the Russians" for "they" and 
"Western Powers" for "U.S.S.R." and the 
true position is accurately described. 

Such inversion of the truth is an old 
Russian custom. It lends special signifi 
cance to the accusation which follows: 
"The policy of the present leaders of the 
United States and Britain is a policy of 
aggression and the unleashing of a new 
war." 



Objection is being taken by several 
clergymen to the Prime Minister s political 
broadcasts on Sunday nights, and it is 
suggested he could choose some other suit 
able day for this talk. Unfortunately there 
are far too many inroads being made on 
the sacredness of the Sabbath, and those 
in high places should set a lead that 
others could follow. 



34 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



This 




breakfast 

gives you yyL of your 
daily food needs . . . 






FOOD EXPERTS say: 



that one plate of Kellogg s Corn Flakes with 
milk and sugar plus fresh fruit and bread 
and butter (or toast) gives you 1/3 of your 
daily food needs. 

And compare the 
cost with this typical 

heavy breakfast! 

It isn t necessary to quote prices 
. . . you know what you have to 
pay for eggs, bacon, tomatoes, 
fish, lamb s fry (etc.) these 
days! One serving of Kellogg s 
Corn Flakes is but a fraction of 
that cost. What s more, one 
plate of Kellogg s Corn Flakes 
with milk and sugar is equal in 
energy value to three eggs, two 
big helpings of lamb s fry vr 
three fish ! 




So light. . . 



delicious . . . and so satisfying! 

These big, golden Kellogg s Corn Flakes not only 
taste luscious, but they are packed with energy value. 
Only 30 seconds to serve ... no greasy washing 
up ... no messy pots and pans. So serve Kel 
logg s Corn Flakes to all your family. Remember 
to say "Kellogg s" before you say Corn Flakes 
because nothing else can equal them for flavour, 
energy value or freshness. 



FREE RECIPE BOOK. Send your name and address to 
Kelloggs, Box 8, P.O., Mascot, N S.ff 7 . and you ll receive 
a wonderful new Recipe Book. FREE and POST FREE. 




CORN FLAKES 



SAVE TIME. TROUBLE AND MONEY 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



35 



For Your Easter Table 



o-Qo- o-o 

Easter Cake. (Illustrated). 

Easter decorations for a cake may be 
made by spreading cream cheese half an 
inch thick on a sheet of waxed paper or a 
candy slab and cutting the desired shape 
with a cookie cutter. 

The Cake: Sift 2 cupsful of flour with 3 
teaspoonsful of baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
ful of salt and f cupful of sugar. Chop fine 
J cupful of nuts and 1^ cupsful of seeded 
raisins. Mix the fruit and nuts with 1 
cupful of whole-wheat flour and add to the 
other mixture wit* i teaspoonful of cin 
namon and the same of nutmeg. Beat 2 
eggs well and add to \\ cupsful of milk; 
combine the ingredients; fold in ^ cupful 
of melted shortening. Bake in a round 
cake-tin about 1 hour. Turn out, ice with 
coffee icing made by mixing confectioner s 
sugar to a paste with cream and flavouring 
with clear hot coffee. A richer icing is 
obtained by adding a teaspoonful of soft 
ened butter during the mixing of the 
sugar, cream and coffee. Decorate. 



Fish Moochie. 

Flake into pieces suitable for serving \ 
cupful of crab meat and cupful of lob 
ster, and combine these with \ cupful of 
prawns. In the chafing dish melt 3 table- 
spoonsful of butter, add 2 tablespoonsful 
of flour and simmer to a smooth paste. Then 
slowly stir in \ cupful of milk and cook till 
thick. Beat 2 eggs and add then to \ cup 
ful of milk, then add this mixture care 
fully to the sauce in the chafing dish. When 
thick, stir in \ cupful of mushrooms, 1 
small pimiento cut into strips, the fish, \ 
teaspoonful of salt, \ teaspoonful each of 
white pepper and paprika, a dash of mace 
and 3 grains of cayenne. Cook until the 
mixture is thoroughly heated, then add 3 
tablespoonsful of cooking sherry. Serve 
at once on toasted crackers. 



For Fish Days. 

Dip haddock, halibut or white fish in 
flour, then in beaten egg to which 1 table- 
spoonful of lemon juice has been added. 
Eoll in dry crumbs or corn meal and fry. 
To cream sauce used with any fish add 
gratings of lemon peel and dash of nutmeg. 
Very good with tuna fish. 



Fish Moulds. 

Three cupsful cornflakes, \\ cupsful milk, 
2 tablespoonsful mayonnaise, 2 table- 
spoonsful chopped parsley, 1^ tablespoons 
ful minced onion, 2 tablespoonsful lemon 
juice, \ teaspoonful thyme, \\ teaspoonsful 
salt, dash pepper, 2 eggs (well-beaten), 2 
cupsful flaked cooked fish. 

Crush cornflakes into fine crumbs; com 
bine with milk. Add mayonnaise, pars 
ley, onion, lemon juice and seasonings; 
mix well. Stir in egg and fish. Pour into 
well-greased individual moulds or muffin 
tins. Bake in moderate oven about 45 
minutes. Unmould. 

Drumfish with Freedom Sauce. 

Three Ibs. fillet of drumfish, 4 cupsful 
of tomatoes, 2 tnblespoonsf.ul of dripping, 
i cupful of finely-cut onion, $ cupful of 
chopped green pepper, 1 tablespoonful 
salt, 1 tablespoonful of table sauce, pepper 
to taste, cornflour to make a thick sauce. 

The onion and the dripping are put into 
a frying pan; fry until brown; add the 
tomatoes, and boil for 20 minutes; rub 
through a strainer, return to the fire and 
add the cornflour, which has been mixed 
with a little cold water; boil for 15 min 



utes; add the seasoning and the green 
pepper; wash and dry the fish, put into a 
greased baking dLsh, pour the sauce over 
the fish, put into a hot oven and bake for 
from 30 to 35 minutes; remove to a hot 
platter and sprinkle with parsley. Garnish 
with slices of lemon. 



Olive and Mushroom Stuffed Fish. 

One 3-4 Ib. fish prepared for stuffing, 
\ Ib. mushrooms (sliced), i cupful mar 
garine, 4 large ripe olives (chopped), \ 
teaspoonful thyme, \ teaspoonful salt, \ 
teaspoonful pepper, 2 cupsful toasted 
bread cubes. 

Brown mushrooms lightly in margarine 
and mix with olives, seasonings, and 
bread. Stuff fish cavity which has been 
seasoned with salt and pepper. Sew or 
skewer opening, place fish in greased shal- 



(the slices should be very thin), place a 
portion of the mixture on a slice of bacon 
and roll it up neatly. Do the same with 
the other rashers. Whip the white of egg 
to a very stiff froth and stir it lightly into 
the batter. Dip each little roll into the 
batter, then fry in hot fat until light 
brown. 

Egg and Bacon Loaf. 

One and a half Ibs. lean steak, \ Ib. 
bacon, 1 breakfastcupful white bread 
crumbs, ^ teaspoonful salt, \ teaspoonful 
pepper, 1 tablespoonful tomato sauce, 1 
tablespoonful Worcester sauce, 1 egg, a 
little stock or gravy, 3 hard-boiled eggs. 

Put the steak and bacon through the 
miacer twice. Add the breadcrumbs, 
seasoning and sauces and when well mixed 
add the beaten egg, and, if necessary, a 
little stock. Well grease a baking mould 
with clarified dripping and cover the bot 
tom with some of the meat mixture. Re 
move the shells from the eggs and arrange 




low baking pan and bake at 375 degrees 
for \ hour or until tender. Serve with 
lemon or cucumber sauce. 



Kromeskies of Eggs. 

Three hard-boiled fresh eggs, about \ 
Ib. of streaky bacon, 2 tablespoonsful of 
crumbs, 2 teaspoonsful of chopped pars 
ley, \ teaspoonful of chopped onion, 2 or 
3 tablespoonsful of any sauce, salt and 
pepper. 

For the Frying Batter: 2 ozs. of plain 
flour, 1 fresh egg and 1 extra yolk, 1 table- 
spoonful of salad oil, 2 tablespoonsful of 
milk, salt. 

First prepare the batter. Mix the fl,our 
and salt, make a well in the centre and 
put in the two yolks and the oil. Stir these 
into the flour, adding the milk gradually 
at the same time. Beat the batter well. 
Put aside while the egg mixture is being 
made. Shell the eggs, chop them coarsely 
and mix with the crumbs, onion, parsley, 
and enough sauce to bind the mixture. 
Season it carefully. Cut off the bacon rind 



them end to end down the centre. Pack 
the meat mixture well around them and 
cover over with the meat. Bake in a mod 
erate oven for one hour. When cold, turn 
out and cut in thin slices. 



Nut and Potato Balls. 

About a Ib. of cold, boiled potatoes; 2 
ozs. of margarine or dripping; 1 table- 
spoonful of chopped parsley; a little chop 
ped onion; 2 or more ozs. of chopped nuts; 
salt and pepper. 

Mash the potatoes smoothly, then put 
them in a saucepan with the margarine, 
parsley, onion, and seasoning, adding a 
little milk, if necessary, to bind. Beat the 
mixture until it is quite smooth, then 
shape it into neat balls. Make a hole in 
the centre of each ball and fill it with 
chopped nuts; cover the nuts with some of 
the potato mixture. Slightly grease a fire 
proof dish, put the balls in it, and cook 
them in a moderate oven for about i hour 
or until they are hot through. Serve very 
hot with savoury sauce and egg and bacon 
loaf. < . 



36 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



tVAv-V 

ctf* 




WRITE 

NOW 

FOR 

YOUR 

COPIES 

"MAKE IT IN WOOL 

caters for all the 
family s needs and 
offers a wide range 
of styles for the 
corning seasons. 



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DEPT 5 BOX 1606 M. MELBOURNE or BOX 3718 SS. SYDNEY 



The Play and Film 

[From page 27.] 

without sympathetic qualities. Featured 
in support are Burl Ives, and Agnes Moore- 
head. 

* * * 

The "Oliver Twist" film is meeting with 
a stormy reception from Jewish people on 
the Continent and elsewhere; objection is 
taken to the portrayal of Fagin the Jew. 

* * # 

Old friend Cecil Kellaway is making 
great headway in Hollywood. His latest 
characterisation, that of a leprechaun (a 
pixie) in "Luck of the Irish", has won for 
him an Oscar nomination for the best sup 
porting role. Can you imagine the 16-stone 
Cecil as a pixie? 

* * # 

Hollywood managements are tightening 
up control on the stars and near stars. In 
future if a star disappoints in attendances, 
film controllers will have no hesitancy 
in cancellifig contracts. They have 
been long-suffering for quite a time, but 
that has now ended. A sign of the times? 

* * * 

Starring role in "The Devil s Doorway" 
a large-scale outdoor drama will go to 
Kobert Taylor. He ll play a young Indian 
war veteran of the American Civil War 
who txrns outlaw. 



Which is larger 
YOUR BUST or 
YOUR KIPS? 



For figure beauty all 
measurements and 
weight must be in pro 
portion to height. The 
hips must measure the 
same as the bust, the 
calf the same as the 
knee. 

FILL THIS IN TO-NIGHT ! 





FREE! Complete Chart, 
Diagnosis Questionnaire 
and Booklet. 

The Chart gives you the ideal 
weight and measurements for 
your age and height. 
The Questionnaire, when com 
pleted, enables me to diagnose 
your figure faults and to correct 
them by graduated Figure Cul 
ture and Physiological Move 
ments, Diet, etc. 
Age is no bar to figure beauty 
and no one is too old to begin. 

WRITE TO-DAY. ENCLOSE lid. IN 
STAMPS FOR POSTAGE. 

T. A. LANGRIDGE 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 



2/461 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



37 



Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon will 
be together for the sixth time in "The 
Forsyte Saga." Errol Flynn and Eobert 
Young will share starring honours and 
Janet Leigh and Reginald Owen will head 
the supporting cast. 

* # * 

After her fine dramatic work in "Act of 
Violence," Janet Leigh draws the role of 
the ballerina heroine in M-G-M s "Storm 
over Vienna," in which she stars with 
Peter Lawford and Audrey Totter. 

* * * 

Judy Garland s daughter, Liza, will make 
her screen debut in the M-G-M musical, 
"In the Good Old Summer Time." Judy is 
trying to persuade co-star Van Johnson to 
permit his daughter, Schuyjer Van, to 
appear in the same sequence. 

* * # 

James Mason has decided to settle in 
Hollywood and is buying a home near the 
Beverly Hills Hotel. Now that his role in 
"Caught" is finished, the actor plans to 
move in with his wife, baby daughter, his 
secretary, and eight cats. 

* * * 

Another honour has come Danny Kaye s 
way. He is modelled in wax at Madame 
Tussaud s. At the unveiling ceremony he 
was the life of the party with his wise 
cracks and jokes about the other dumb 
figures around him. 




LEARN THE 



Hill-Billy Guitar 

Hawaiian Steel Guitar, 

Spanish Guitar, Ukulele, 

Hill-Billy Guitar, 

Cow-Boy Guitar, 

Mandolin and Banjo-Mandolin. 

in 30 minutes 

Let Norm. Scott, the Singing 
Stockman, teach you! 

You can learn to play your favourite melody or 
accompaniment to your favourite cowboy or popular 
song in :;n minutes. Be the most popular member 
of your set play around the camp -fire, at dances, 
parties, or over the radio. Jt tosts only 2/6 
weekly to learn in the comfort of your own home. 
AND the Postal Instruction Course is so simple 
the srntll"St buck-ip) >n follow it. 

MONEY - RACK GUARANTEE 

Don t forget there s a MONEY-BACK GUAR 
ANTEE if you are not satisfied. Decide to-day 
to change your whole life through the magic 
and popularity of real hill-billy music. 

NORM. SCOTT, the Singing Stockman 
HAWAIIAN CLUB 

P- ~ POST THIS COUPON TO-DAY , 

i " The Howoiion Club," AHJ i 

Kemb/o Building 58 Margaret St., Sydney. . 
p ieose senc me by return mail complete 
detail!, of your Home f>tuay Course without . 
obligation. Tell me how i con obtain a 
Hill-tilly Guitar Howoiion Guitar, Spanish 
Guitar, Ukulele. Marco/in and Banjo-Man 
dolin on a small Deposit 

Nome . 



Thii Offer obtainablt ONLY from above odoress 



THROW OFF THE MASK! 

PIMPLES, BLACKHEADS are UGLY FEATURES 

Refined Folk Avoid Your Acquaintance 
I tell readers of this Journal free how to remove blemishes in ten days 

Stubborn cases that baffled physicians and beauty 
specialists have been cured You have never used or 
heard of anything like it Makes muddv complexions, 
red spots, pimples, blackheads, eruptions, vanish 
almost like magic. No cream, lotion, enamel, salve 
plaster, bandage, mask, massage, diet or apparatus, 
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plexion is a "fright," whether your face is full of muddy 
spots, peppery blackheads, embarrassing pimples and 
eruptions or if your skin is rough and "porey," and 
vou ve tried almost everything under the sun to get 
rid of the blemishes. This wonderful treatment, in just 
ten days, positively removes every blemish, and beau 
tifies your skin in a marvellous way You look years 
vounger. It gives the skin the bloom, tint and purity 
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subject of wild admiration by your friends, no matter 
what your age 

ALL METHODS NOW KNOWN ARE CAST ASIDE 

There is nothing to wear, nothing to take internally. Your face, even arms, hands, shoulders are 
beautified bevond your fondest dreams All this I will absolutely prove to you before your own eves 
i your mirror in ten days This treatment is absolutely harmless to the most delicate skin and 
very pleasant to use No change in your mode of living necessary A few minutes daily does it. 
To every reader of this Journal I will give full details of this really astounding treatment. Let me 
show you You risk nothing. Send me 4d. in stamps, your name and address, and I will give 
vou lull details. 

MISS GRACE DUNCAN (Suite H8), BOX 4138 G.P.O., SYDNEY 

491 PITT STREET. SYDNEY 



185 Little Mothers Wanted 




for these darling 

Hurry, before they all go 

Secure a "JAY" Doll for 

YOUR little girl ! 

Here s the loveliest gift a little girl could wish | 
for ... a "JAY" doll ... a life-like, baby- I 
ize doll that says "Ma-Ma," shuts her pretty 
blue eyes and goes to sleep . . . the dearest, 
cuddliest doll that will delight every little 
mother lucky enough to own onel 

First Release in Australia 
Limited Supplies 

Only a limited quantity of the first "Jay" 
dolls to be received from the manufac 
turer are available for direct sale to the 
public. These dolls are exceptional value 

almost unbreakable composition head, 

legs, and arms, cuddly body, hand-painted 
features with curls, daintily dressed in 
pretty pastel silks, trimmed with lace, 
with undies, and stands 18 inches high 
in her leather shoes. The price is only 
5.2, post extra, but HURRY with your 
order supplies are limited! 

Satisfaction or 
MONEY BACK ! 



JAY" Dolls! 



1 Worldwide Mail Order Pty. Ltd. 




1 


1 Dept. 16, 24 Clarence Street, 


Sydney. 


1 


(Enclosed is 2 (complete cost), or 


posted 2/6 




extra for one "JAY" Doll. 










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1 Address 




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April. 49 I 



All Beautifully Dressed But Hurry! ThU 

exquisite doll is dressed in many shades 
of pastel silks. In our warehouse you 
can shop in comfort. 



38 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



YOUR BRASS 

SHINES BRIGHTER 
CLEANED WITH 

Itrasso 



^ THE 
1 QUALITY 
i METAL 
POLISH 




The Daily Diet of 
EVERY EXPECTANT MOTHER 

should be well balanced and sheuld include essential Vitamins and 
Mineral Salts, for these play a vital part in the building of a strong, 
healthy, well-developed baby. 

BIO-CHEM1C TREATMENT now will supply these essential Vitamins 

and Mineral Salts by natural means through the Twelve Bio-Chemic 

Nerve and Tissue building Cell Salts. They will also safeguard your 

own system to meet the added strain, and ensure a rich supply of 

natural milk, a more comfortable confinement and a speedy recovery. 

Consultations and expert advice free of charge no obligation. 

Write to Dept. AHJ. 4 for FREE BOOKLET. 

Established 20 years. 



B lOrCHEM 1C INSTITUTE 



BOX 1249 L, GP.O., MELBOURNE. 
Office: 108 QUEEN STREET, MELBOURNE, C.I. Phone: MU 1971. 




R. for Starch ! 

Thank you Freddie Fledg 
ling for that answer. You 
are quite right. R. stands for Robin, and 
Robin has always stood for the whitest 
starch starch that lends wings to the iron. 

ROBIN Starch 

IT S SO EASY WITH ROBIN 



BROTHERLY WARMTH 

[From page .75.] 

right-hand needle, take 2 tog., turn, leav 
ing remaining sts. on a spare needle. 

Continue on these sts., but dec. 1 st. at 
armhole edge on next 4 alternate rows, 
and at the same time dec. 1 st. at neck 
edge on every alternate row until 24 sts. 
remain. Continue without shaping until 
work measures 18 ins. from beg., ending 
at armhole edge. 




Shoulder Shaping: Cast off 12 sts. at beg. 
of next row and next alternate row. Join 
wool to neck edge of sts. for other side 
and work up this to match first. 
Sleeves. 

With No. 12 needles cast on 65 sts. and 
work 2 ins. in k. 1, p. 1 rib. 

Change to No. 10 needles and work in 
patt., but inc. 1, st. at both ends of llth 
row and every following 12th row until 
there are 85 sts. Continue without shap 
ing until work measures 16 ins. from beg., 
then shape top by dec. 1 st. at both ends 
of every row until 15 sts. remain. Cast off. 
Neck Band. 

Join left shoulder seam, then with right 



$ (jJLl> JOftufrWi C 




Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



39 



side of work facing you and using No. 12 
needles pick up and k. 190 sts. all round 
neck edge. Work 10 rows in k. 1, p. 1 rib, 
but dec. 1 st. at each side of centre front 
on every row. Cast off ribwise. 

Making-up. 

Press work lightly on wrong side. Join 
right shoulder seam, sew in sleeves, then 
sew up side and sleeve seams. 



Home Training. 

Cardinal Griffin, Roman Catholic Arch 
bishop of Westminster, has warned parents 
of their responsibility towards their child 
ren and the great necessity for proper 
home training. Home training, obedience 
and discipline mean good children. "Don t 
allow the State," he said, "to relieve you of 
these responsibilities, because if you do it 
will certainly relieve you of the children." 
Men and women who lead a full Christian 
life every day and every hour are a shining 
example to their children. If the home 
life is good the children will be good. 
Gambling and drinking and easy-going, 
tolerant parents are a menace to the State. 
It is from such homes that the young 
criminals come. 



It is interesting to note that less than 1 
per cent, of Australia s national income is 
spent on motion picture entertainment. 
Australia s national income is approxi 
mately .1,650 millions. Of this amount 
only* 13 millions less than 1% repre 
sents the aggregate box-office takings of 
all the theatres in Australia. 



Put a tablespoonful of kerosene in the 
water with which you wash your linoleum. 
Then the lino, will last longer and retain 
its colour. 




ARE YOU OVERWEIGHT? 

To be overweight is both unhealthy and un 
lovely makes you look years older! Get rid 
of it by my perfect method. No dieting no irk 
some exercises. The sum of !/!/- covers the 
whole cost, no further expense. Result guaran 
teed, no matter how long-standing the fat con 
dition. Send 6d. in stamps for full particulars to, 
MATRON MARION GOSS, Dept. J, 
Box 32, P.O., North Sydney, N.S.W. 







GRAHAM SPEARS, of 9 Greenhill Road, Dulwich, S.A. 

Dear Sirs, Enclosed you will find a photograph of my son 

"Graham," aged 2 years and 3 months. I first started Graham 

on Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits at the age of 6 months, 

giving him one biscuit twice a day, soaked only in unsweetened 

boiling water. At nine months he was having three biscuits 

this way every day at midday, as well as nibbling them during 

the day. 

Graham is strong and healthy and has never had any serious 

illness. 

I still give him Arnott s biscuits. (Signed) Mrs. F. Spears. 



A MO U : --S 



MILKMRROWROQT 

hSG tflT S ^ 



There is no Substitute for Quality/ 



Wonderful FREE BOOK proves there is 

NO NEED TO WEAR GLASSES 



.HUNDREDS of men, women and young people have 
written to me, worried and fearful about their eyes. 
After reading the amazing free book, " Better Natural 
Sight Without Wearing Glasses," they have found that 
there is a way to regain normal vision without the need 
of glasses at all. 

My patients include men for the Navy and Air 
Force, and also men qualifying for all trades 
and professions : Civil Aviators, Civil Ser 
vants, Clerks, Motorists, Engineers, Policemen, 
Railwaymen, Engine Drivers people whose 
careers depend upon their eyes. 





Try this simple test 
for ASTIGMATISM. 
To the normal eye j 
the width and depth) 
of colour in the 
black bars of all; 
four circles are uni-j 
form. When astig 
matism exists there 
is variation in the] 
width and depth ofj 
bars. 



If you suffer from 

SHORT SIGHT LONG SIGHT 

FAILING SIGHT ASTIGMATISM 

TIRED EYES, GLARE, 

TURNED EYES 

STRAIN EYE HEADACHES 

or any other eye weakness (except 

diseased eyes) write for my BOOK 

or call for free consultation at 

EYESIGHT TRAINING 

(Ferguson System) 

Room 604H, Manchester Unity Bldg. 
185 Elizabeth St., Sydney. MA.5455 



HOW TO GET MY BOOK FREE 
Just write (enclosing 2Jd. postage) or 
call TO-DAY for 32-page Free 
Booklet, "Better Natural Sight With 
out Wearing: Glasses" This includes 
testimonials from happy people who have 
discarded glasses. It will open up a new 
avenue of hope for you. 

FREE CONSULTATION 
Ring MA 5455 for Free Consultation. 



40 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



YOU CAN NOW QUICKLY LEARN TO 

PLAY THE 

PIANO 




If you have ever wanted to 
here is your opportunity to 
remarkable English system. 

You may never have touched a 
piano before. It makes no difference. 
No matter how little you may know 
about music no matter if you do 
not know one note from another, 
you can quickly learn to play by the 
new, rapid Graphonote System. 

You need no knowledge whatever 
of music or notes in order to be 
able to read music by the Graphonote 
System and to play it. 

If you have already tried to learn 
the piano in the ordinary way with 
wearisome scales, exercises and tedious 
practice the new Graphonote System 
will come as a positive revelation to you. 

In England where the Graphonote 
System originated, over ten thousand 
people most of whom had no 
previous knowledge of music have 
learned to play by means of this 
revolutionary system. 

NO "DRUDGERY" 

The Graphonote System is indeed 
revolutionary. In the past it took 
years of practice to store the player s 
mind with "mental pictures" of the 
notes so that they could be easily 
found on the keyboard. With the 
Graphonote System the "mental 
pictures" of the notes are already 
provided. They are clearly before 
your eyes. Years of drudgery are thus 
at one stroke eliminated. 
PLAY STANDARD MUSIC 

When playing by the Graphonote 
System you read from real, standard 
"five-line" music the sort that is 
recognised by musicians all the world 
over. 



be able to play the piano, then 
learn quickly by means of a 

The Graphonote System provides 
the most rapid and natural me;hod 
of mastering ordinary standard music. 
It should not in any way be confused 
with "patent," "trick" or "number" 
systems or other similar "dead end" 
makeshifts. Those who learn by such 
systems never master the standard 
musical notation and are lost when 
later they are confronted with a sheet 
of ordinary music. 

The more you play by the Grapho 
note System, on the other hand, the 
more familiar you become with standard 
musical notation. 

YOU LEARN AT HOME 

By the Graphonote System, which 
consists of a course of carefully graded 
postal lessons, you learn privately in 
your own home. It does not matter 
where you live, you can learn anywhere. 
You learn in your own time at your own 
convenience, without anyone present 
to embarrass you. If you make a slip 
"Graphonote" shows you at once where 
you are wrong. 

ILLUSTRATED BOOK FREE 

You want to be able to play the 
Piano well here is your opportunity. 
What thousands of others HAVE 
DONE you too CAN DO. 
The Graphonote System is described 
in a booklet entitled, "A New Way 
to Learn the Piano at Home." This 
booklet is FREE. Simply send your 
name and address NOW and let us 
post you a copy at once. 

ST. JAMES SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

(Dept. 3 ) 66 King St., Sydney 





USE IODEX FOR: Stiff and Swollen 
Joints, Sprains and Bruises, Swollen 
Glands, Rheumatic Twinges, Neuralgia 
Pains, Chest Congestion, Muscular Cramp, 
Stiff Neck, Synovitis, Neuritis, Lumbago. 



End nagging muscular 
pains now. Rub in 
IODEX iodine ointment 
rub out the pain. 
IODEX possesses nearly 
twice the strength of tinc 
ture of iodine but does 
not stain, blister or 
harden the skin. IODEX 
is excellent First Aid, but 
in stubborn cases see your 
Doctor. 

if Where skin is not broken 
and there is much pain, use 
Green Label lodex a com 
bination of lodex with 

Methyl Salicylate, which 
possesses quite remarkable 
pain-relieving properties. 




IODEY 

H NO-STAIN IODINE ^^^ 



At all Chemists 



James Stewart is popularly regarded as 
one of cinemaland s most eligible bachelors, 
and he may remain just that. In a recent 
interview at Warner Bros., where he 
starred in "Hope", a forthcoming Trans 
atlantic Picture we shall shortly see here, 
he denied any romantic entanglements 
whatsoever. "I ve waited this long for 
marriage and I don t aim to be rushed," he 
said. "In fact, I may just keep right on 
waiting." 



You remember Sabu, the Elephant Boy, 
who paid a short visit to Australia a couple 
of years ago. He is 24 now and plans to 
make a jungle picture in full Technicolor. 
It will be an ambitious effort, made in 
India at one-sixth of what it would cost in 
America. 



Nasturtium Vinegar. 

Pick sufficient nasturtium flowers (heads 
only) to fill a pickle bottle. Press in well, 
add a pinch of salt and a very little cay 
enne pepper. Boil sufficient vinegar to 
cover and allow to become quite cold before 
pouring over the flowers. Cork down 
tightly. 



To stiffen the bristles of old brushes 
hang them over a basin of cold water so 
that only the bristles are submerged. Leave 
overnight and then dry in the ordinary 
way. 



FORD PILLS 

are the gentle, tasteless, 

painless laxative for all 

your family. 

FORD RILLS 

are liked "by Hospitals for 

patients before and after 

operations. 

FORD PILLS 

help remove the toxins that 

often cause your rheumatic 

aches and pains and 

headaches. 

Get Ford Pills 

in handy plastic tubes, 

2 6 everywhere 



F.P.8 




WITH 



*tW 

Oatiil 

OHIGINATCO IN ENGIAN D \ 



OATINE Snow (Vanishing Cream) 
OATINE Cold Cream 
OATINE Powder Base 
OATINE Skin Tonic 
OATINE Hand Lotion 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



41 



Dramatic Deceptive Sleeve. 
These little sleeves add a new and 
dramatic effect to a sleeveless dinner 
frock, therefore giving you two frocks 
one an evening frock and the other a party 
or dinner frock. You may have a favourite 




frock without sleeves and you sometimes 
wish for sleeves, so why not make a pair? 
As you can see by diagrams B. C and D 
it s just a straight piece of material 
gathered on elastic (garter style). The 
elastic made to fit your arms, of course. 




PTURE UNTOLD PLEASURE 

Friends invitations 
outings! 

LEARN AT HOME 

Be playing oil your 

Favourite tunes and 

Screen hits in a few 

weeks with a 

SAMPSON 

POSTAL COURSE 

casts nothing if 

net satisfied. 




LEARN AT 
HOME FOR 

2/6 

WEEKLY 



No scales or exercises. 

No need to be clever. 

Beginners start playing 
in 30 minutes. 

LESSONS 
INSTRUMENTS 

From 2/6 weekly wherever 

you live for either 

if Banjo Mandolin 

if Hill-billy Guitar 

if Steel Guitar 

if Piano Accordion 

if Button Accordion 

if Mouth Oregon 

Piano if Ukulele 
if Banjo Ukulele 

if Saxophone 

if Violin if Clarinet 



FREE. Write for free catalogue 
and booklet (state instrument 
favoured) to 

SAMPSONS, Depi C 

481 Kent Si 

Bo 4I84X, G.P.O., Sydney 



Austrolio s FOREMOST School 





LAXETTES 

for their children and themselves 




18 IN TINS 1/9 



The 

LAXATIVE 

KNOWN and TRUSTED 
FOR 40 YEARS 



GENTLE, EFFECTIVE, 
SAFE, RELIABLE 

LAXETTES contain phenolphlhalein, which is 
non- habit forming and is one of the safest 
and most reliable laxative substances known 
to medical science. This is incorporated in the 
finest block chocolate by an exclusive, 
scientific process, which ensures accurate 
dosage and strict conformity to British 
Pharmacopoeia standards. 



SAMPLE (BLOCK 

COUPON ^LETTERS 

SEND2^d iPLEASE 

stamp to cover 

postage and 

packing . . . to Laxetfe Mfg. Co., 346 Swanston "street", NeFboiirn* 



42 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



F.SCHONBACH 




I IT S BILL S BIRTHDAY - 

WB ll GIVE HIM A SURPRISE -PARTY.*. 



2. ..AND 50 TO BILL S HOUSE., 




. 5VRPR/5E 




. .AND WAS BILL SURPRISED ! 

^FOILED 




S I CAN 

STTLl WIN HIM / NAY KRA^FT 
SAVOURIES Will DO THE TRICK. 



6. ..NO DOUBT ABOUT YOU. MARGE-YOU D 
MAKE A WONDERFUL WIFE? SAYS BILL. 



Kraft Cheese TASTES better because it s BLENDED BETTER / 

You can count on Kraft Cheddar Cheese for 
flavour the same rich, delicious flavour and blended 
goodness in every mouthful the same creamy 
smoothness and freshness from the first to the last 
slice in the packet ! 

And you can count on Kraft Cheese for food 
value. Ounce for ounce, there s no basic food to 
equal cheese for complete, high quality proteins . . . 
for calcium, phosphorus and other valuable 
nutrients of milk. 

Lbten to "MARY LIVINGSTONE, M.D." NOTE: Kraft Cheese has an extra high calorific 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday content which means that it supplies you and your 
t^ in all States. family with abundant energy. 




Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



43 



LONDON TOWN JUMPER 



>Qo- 



A London knitting expert has designed this gay jumper for you to knit. 



Make it in a brave Guardsman scarlet, 
with those familiar landmarks of London 
Town St. Paul s, Tower Bridge and Nel 
son s Column in dazzling white across the 
yoke. 

It s a "knitted" you re going to love, and 
quite the nicest thing about it is that it s 
all made in stocking-stitch, except for 
simple ribbing at neck, sleeves and waist, 
so even a beginner can tackle it. 

Materials: 6 ozs. 3-ply wool in red, 1 oz. 
of the same wool in white. A pair each 
of Nos. 10 and 12 knitting needles. 

Measurements: Length, 18^ ins. To fit 
32-inch bust measurement. Sleeve seam, 6 
ins. 

Tension: 8 sts. and 9 rows to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; tog., 
together; sts., stitches; st.-st., stocking- 
stitch; rep., repeat; beg., begin or begin 
ning; ptn., pattern; cont., continue; ins., 
inches; E., red; W., white. 
The Back. 

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 100 sts. 
with red wool and work in a k. 1, p. 1 rib 
for 3 ins. Change to No. 10 needles and 
cont. in st.-st., inc. 1 st. at each end of the 
7th and every following 8th row until 
there are 120 sts. and work measures 12 
ins. Shape armholes: Cast off 5 sts. at 
beg. of next 2 rows, then dec. 1 st. at each 
end of every k. row until 96 sts. rem. Cont. 
without shaping until armholes measure 6 
ins. in depth. Shape shoulders: Cast off 
10 sts. at beg. of 6 rows. Cast off. 
The Front. 

Work as for back until armhole shaping 
is completed. Now cont. in the ptn. thus: 
Join on white. 1st row K. 4 E., 16 W., 

1 E., 13 W., 17 E., 13 W., 2 E., 23 W., 7 E. 
2nd row P. 7 E., 23 W., 2 E., 14 W., 15 
E., 14 W., 2 E., 14 W., 5 E. 3rd row K. 4 
E., 1 W., 3 E., 7 W., 4 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
5 E., 9 W., 13 E., 9 W., 4 E., 2 W., 3 E., 

2 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 8 E. 4th row 
P. 8 E., 2 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 

1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 3 E., 

3 W., 4 E., 5 W., 2 E., 2 W., 11 E., 2 W., 

2 E., 5 W., 5 E., 2 W., 7 E., 5 W., 9 E. 
6th row K. 9 E., 5 W., 8 E., 2 W., 4 E., 
5 W., 3 E., 2 W., 9 E., 2 W., 3 E., 5 W., 

3 E., 2 W., 5 E., 2 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 

1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 

2 W., 8 E. 6th row P. 8 E., 2 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W. 
1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., I E., 

1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 6 E., 2 W., 2 E., 5 W., 

4 E., 2 W., 7 E., 2 W., 4 E., 5 W., 3 E., 

2 W., 9 E., 5 W., 9 E. 7th row K. 9 E., 

5 W., 10 E., 2 W., 2 E., 5 W., 5 E., 2 W., 
5 E., 2 W., 5 E., 5 W., 1 E., 2 W., 7 E., 

2 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W. 
1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E.; 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 8 E. 8th row 
P. 8 E., 2 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 8 E., 
7 W., 6 E., 2 W., 3 E., 2 W., 6 E., 5 W., 
1 E., 2 W., 10 E., 7 W., 8 E. 9th row 
K. 9 E., 5 W., 12 E., 7 W., 7 E., 1 W., 

3 E., 1 W., 7 E., 6 W., 9 E., 2 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 8 E. 10th row P. 8 E., 



2 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
1 E,, 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 2 W., 9 E., 6 W., 
19 E., 6 W., 14 E., 3 W., 10 E. llth row 
K. 10 E., 3 W., 14 E., 6 W., 19 E., 5 W., 
10 E., 21 W., 8 E. 12th row P. 8 E., 
21 W., 10 E., 29 W., 15 E., 3 W., 10 E. 
13th row K. 10 E., 3 W., 15 E., 29 W., 
10 E., 21 W., 8 E. 14th row P. 10 E., 
17 W., 12 E., 5 W., 19 E., 5 W., 15 E., 

3 W., 10 E. 15th row K. 10 E., 3 W., 
16 E., 3 W., 21 E., 3 W., 13 E., 17 W., 
10 E. 16th tow P. 10 E., 17 W., 14 "E., 
1 W., 23 E., 1 W., 17 E., 3 W., 10 E. 17th 
row K. 10 E., 3 W., 17 E., 1 W., 23 E., 
1 W., 14 E., 17 W., 10 E. 18th row 
P. 11 E., 15 W., 57 E., 3 W., 10 E. 19th 
row K. 10 E., 3 W., 57 E., 15 W., 11 B. 
20th row P. 12 E., 13 W., 58 E., 3 W., 



10 E. 21st row K. 10 E., 3 W., 59 E., 

11 W., 13 E. 22nd row P. 13 E., 11 W., 
59 E., 3 W., 10 E. 23rd row K. 10 E., 
3 W., 61 E., 7 W., 15 E. 24th row P. 16 
E., 5 W., 62 E., 3 W., 10 E. Shape neck: 
25th row K. 10 E., 3 W., 25 E., turn. 
26th row P. 25 E., 3 W., 10 E. 27th 
row K. 10 E., 3 W., k. E. to last 2 sts., 
k. 2 tog. 28th row P. 24 E., 3 W., 10 E. 
29th row K. 10 E., 3 W., k. to last 2 sts., 
k. 2 tog. 30th row P. 22 E., 5 W., p. 9 E. 
31st row K. 10 E., 3 W., k. E to last 2 
sts., k. 2 tog. 32nd row P. 23 E., 1 W., 
11 E. 33rd row K. 11 E., 1 W., k. to last 
2 sts., k. 2 tog. 34th row P. 22 E., 1 W., 
11 E. 35th row K. 11 E., 1 W., k. to last 
2 sts., k. 2 tog. 36th row P. 21 E., 1 W., 
10 E. Break off W. Cont. with E., dec. 
1 st. at neck edge on every k. row until 
30 sts. remain. Cont. until armhole meas 
ures 7 ins. Shape shoulder by casting off 
10 sts. 3 times. 

Slip centre 2 sts. on a safety-pin. Join 
[Turn to page 50.] 




44 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 




BABY: This may not be any joy ride for you, Mummy, 

now that you are being me for a day. 

MUMMY: Joy ride! My skin is so uncomfortable I 

could howl! 

BABY: You see it my way now, Mummy! Now maybe 

you know why you ought to keep my skin protected 

with Johnson s Baby Powder and Johnson s Baby Cream. 

MUMMY: Write your own ticket, lamb! But tell me, 

why do you need both? 

BABY: A cinch, Mummy! Pure, gentle Johnson s 

Baby Cream to soothe me over after my bath, and at 

other times lots of soft, soothing sprinkles of Johnson s 

Baby Powder to chase chafes and prickles. 

MUMMY: Angel, step on the gas and let s be on our 

way to the nearest headquarters for Johnson s. 




PRODUCTS OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 



LEG ULCER DISAPPEARS 



Another "VAREX" Success 



"Just a line to tell you that Varex Treat 
ment has been quite a success in my case," 
writes one grateful user. "The ulcer, with 
its consequent pain and swelling, has en 
tirely disappeared, and the leg is quite 
normal." "Varex" is a simple, inexpen 
sive home treatment. No resting required. 
Only one dressing per week. Write for 
free booklet. Ernest Healey, Pharma 
ceutical Chemist. Varex, Rooms 523-524, 
5th Floor, St. James Building, 1 09W 

Elizabeth Street. Svdnev. 



DEAF? 

"CHICO" INVISIBLE 
EARPHONES, 2I/- Pr. 

Worn inside your ears, no cords or bat 
teries. Guaranteed for your Lifetime. 
"Chico" Earphones have enjoyed an un 
interrupted sale on the Australian market 
for over 20 years. Write for Free Booklet. 
HEARS EARPHONE CO., No. 30 State 
Shopping Block, Market Street, Sydney. 




They can t tell 
the difference 
when hair has 
beenlNECTO D 

(it looks so natural!) 



Get 
from 

18 *"<l Cades I 




IN.9.10 



INECTO 



R4WD 

HAIR COLOUftINO 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



45 




JHarig,old Beret and THiHens 



Materials: 1 oz. Natural, ^ oz. each of 
Brown, Bust and Yellow Paton and Bald 
win s 3-ply wool; one set No. 13 and one 
et No. 10 needles. 

Measurements: Across crown, 9 inches; 
around head, 18 inches. Length of hand, 
6 inches; width, 3 inches. 

Abbreviations: B., brown; E., rust; Y., 
yellow; N., natural; k., knit; p., purl; st., 
stitch; tog., together; rep., repeat; m. 1, 
make 1 (by knitting twice into st.) ; pat., 
pattern. 

Tension: 7 sts. and 9 rows to 1 inch. 
Beret. 

Using the set of No. 13 needles cast on 
each of 3 needles 33 33 34 sts. (100 in 
all). 

Rib in k. 1, p. 1, for 12 rounds. 

Using the 10 needles, k. 1 round, knitting 
twice into every 5th st. to end (120 sts.). 

K. 1 round. 

Next round K., knitting twice into 
every 6th st. to end (140 sta.). 



Next round K. 
Now join B. wool and work 
exactly as for first round of 
chart 7 times. 

Complete 16 rounds of 
chart. 

17th round-K. in B., 
knitting twice into every 
7th st. to end (160 
ets.). 

18th to 21st rounds 
K. in N. 

22nd round In B., 
k., knitting every 7th 
and 8th sts. tog. (140 
sts.). 

23rd round Work 
as 2nd round of 
chart. 

Complete the 16 
rounds of chart 
pat. 

40th round In 
B. wool, k. 5, k. 2 
tog. to end (120 
sts.). 

41st to 45th 
rounds Change to 
the No. 13 needles. 
K. in N. 

46th round Join 
B. wool * k. 8 N., 
then with B. wool, 
k. 2 tog., rep. from 
* to end. 

47th round K. 
1 B., 6 N., 2 B., 
rep. to end. 

48th round K. 
2 B., 4 N., 1 B., k. 2 
B. tog., rep. to end. 
49th round Join 
in E. 4 B., 1 E., 3 B., 
rep. to end. 

50th round K. 3 B., 
3 E., k. 2 B. tog., rep. to 
end. 

51st round Join Y., k. 1, 
k. 2 B. tog., 2 E., 1 Y., 2 E. 
Eepeat to end. 

52nd round K. 1 E., 3 Y., 
k. 2 Y. tog. Eepeat to end. 

63rd round K. 1 Y., 4 E. Eep. 
to end. 

54th round K. 3 E., k. 2 tog. in 
B. Eepeat to end. 

55th round K. 1 B., 1 E., k. 2 tog. 
in B. Eepeat to end. 

56th round K. 1 B., k. 2 B. tog. Eepeat 
to end. 

57th round K. in B. 
58th round With B. wool k. 2 tog. all 
round. Break off, leaving enough wool to 
thread through sts. and finish off securely. 
Press all except ribing with warm iron 
over damp cloth. Finally press flatly with 
beret upside down. 

Mittens. 

Left Hand: Using No. 10 needle and B. 
wool double, cast on each of 3 needles 20 
sts. (60 sts.). 

Using single wool, k. one round in B. 
into backs of sts. 

Next round Eib, k. 1, p. 1 in B. 
Now work in Fair Isle as chart for 13 
rounds (rounds 3 to 15 inclusive). 
K. next 2 rounds in B. 
K. next round in N. 



Next round With N. wool, k. 1, p. 1, k. 
1, p. 1, k. 2 tog., p. 1, k. 1, p. 1, k. 1, p. 2 
tog. Rep. all round. 

Next round K. 1, p. 1 all round. 

Change to No. 13 needles and k. 1, p. 1 
for 4 rounds. 

Next round K. 1, p. 1, k. 1, m. 1, k. 2 
tog., p. 1, k. 1, p. 1, m. 1, p. 2 tog. Eep. all 
round. 

Next 7 rounds Eib in N. 

Change to No. 10 needles and st.st. 2 
rounds. Still using N. wool k. 4, k. twice 
into next st. Rep. all round (60 sts.). 

Next round Comme nce thumb: K. 20 
N., k. next 9 sts. and put on spare needle. 
Now cast on 9 sts. to end of first needle 
and k. them, k. to end of round. 

Next 2 rounds K. in B. 

Now work in Fair Isle as instructed, 
round 3 to round 15 inclusive. 

K. in B. for 2 rounds. 

Change to N. wool, k. 1, k. 2 tog. all 
round (40 sts.). 

K. 10 rounds. 

Next round K. 2, k. 2 tog. to end (30 
sts.). 

Next 4 rounds K. 

Next round K. 1, k. 2 tog. to end (20 
sts.). 

Next 2 rounds K. 

Next round K. 2 tog. to end (10 sts.). 

Now place 5 sts. on each of 2 needles 
and graft tog. Fasten off end. 

Thumb: Put the 9 sts. from needle on to 
No. 10 needle. Pick up 9 sts. at back of 
thumb on to needle. Pick up 1 st. at each 
end. Arrange on 3 needles. K. 16 rounds. 

Next round K. 1, k. 2 tog. Eep. to last 
st., k. 1. Now k. 2 tog. all round, break 
off, leaving enough wool to pass through 
sts. and finish off. 

Bight Hand: Work as Left Hand to com 
mencement of Thumb. 

K. 31, k. next 9 sts. and put on spare 
needle. Cast on 9 to end of needle and k. 
to end of round. 

Now continue as for first mitt to end. 



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20191817161514131111 10987 654 32 I 

D= GROUND SHADE 
v=NIGGER X=R(JST*=YELLOV 

To Make Up. 

Using two strands of wool of two dif 
ferent shades, make two plaits of about 
18 inches in length and run through holes 
at wrist ribbing. Add pom-poms. Press 
well under a damp cloth and warm iron. 



A motorist is a person who, after seeing 
a wreck, drives carefully for several blocks. 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 




V 

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all Chemists 



The modern antiseptic; 
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RECKITT & COLMAN (AUST.) LTD. (PHARMACEUTICAL DIVISION), SYDNEX. 

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Plaster 

Gauze Pad 



PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 



Superfluous Hair 
Killed Quickly 

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for particulars. Confidential. 
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beth Street, Sydney. 




MB ^ " ""^ *^" *^" 

SKIN DISEASES 

i For Free Advice on all Skin Diseases 
| send 2d. stamp for Examination 

9 Chart to 
DERMOPATHIC INSTITUTE 

National Bank Building, 

B 271-9 Collins St., Melb., C.I. F6822 \\ 







Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



47 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

ITURNINGS MUST BE ALLOWED FOR ON ALL PATTERNS] 



FROCK, 7335. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Jacket Front and Back. If padded should 
ers are not needed, shorten shoulder seams 
by cutting off \ inch at the armhole end 
and shape a new armhole curve off to 
nothing about halfway down the armhole, 
as shown on cutting guide. Cut off \ inch 
at armhole end of shoulder seam on both 
front and back and taper the seam line to 
nothing at neck end. 

Sleeve. Pin the half-sleeve to 
a large sheet of paper, mark 
along punchholes indicating 
underarm curve. Fold paper 
along straight edge and cut 
around armhole, underarm 
and lower edge through both 
thicknesses. Notch armhole, 
open out new pattern and cut 




PART 

OF 
SKIRT 



PLEAT TO FIT WAI&T 




7335 




PART 

OF 
SKIRT 

1OTH 8 3-3 INCHtS OF 54" 
E.RIA.L LENGTH - 3O INCHES 

along previously 
marked underarm 
curve. 

Cuff. Make this 2f 

inches wide, long enough to fit lower end 
of sleeve and shape as shown in diagram. 
Skirt. Cut a straight strip of material 
54 inches wide and another 39 inches wide, 
both 30 inches long, or desired length. 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: As this 
pattern has been cut for the average 36- 
inch figure it will be necessary to Bee 
whether alterations are needed for the in 
dividual figure. Pin pieces together, re 
membering that seam and hem allowances 
are not included. Place pattern over figure 



and observe fitting. If waistline is too low, 
shorten front and back by taking a fold in 
pattern between armhole and waistline, 
and if too short, cut in same place and 
insert sufficient paper to provide additional 
length required. 

To increase pattern, pin additional strips 
of paper along seam edges where the extra 
width is required, and to decrease pattern, 
trim away pattern edges where additional 
width is not needed. Remove pattern from 
figure, take apart, press flat, then even 
up all seam edges. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Pin pattern 
to material as shown in cutting guide. 
Cut out with allowance of 2 inches for 
skirt hem, 1 inch on underarm seams 
and inch on all other edges. Before 
removing pattern from material, mark 
clearly with tailor s chalk or tacking 
the exact seam lines, notches and 
punchholes. 

Step 4. Skirt: Join the two 
pieces together in plain seams 
and leave an opening 7 inches 
below waistline on one seam for 
the side opening. Arrange upper 
edge in wide box-pleats, taking 
up sufficient material to enable 
skirt to fit the waistline closely. 
Tack each pleat in place along 
waistline. 

Step 5. Side Opening: Attach a 
zipper to side opening or finish 
with two facing strips of self- 
material If inches wide and 1 
inch longer than the opening, 
with one edge along selvedge. Pin 
strips to front and back edges of 
opening with raw edges together 
and right sides of material facing. 
Machine inch from raw edge, 
press seams open and fold strips 
under so that selvedges are 
exactly under seam lines. Tack 
in place, press front or upper-side 
under on seam line but allow 
back or under-side to extend 
under front. Tie-stitch strips 
together at the bottom. 

Step 6. Waist Band: Cut a self- 
material waist band 3 inches wide 
and 2 inches longer than close 
waist measurement. This provides 
an overlap of 1 inch and ^ inch 
seam allowance on all edges. Pin outside 
of waist band to the inside of skirt and 
machine in place. Turn under seam allow 
ance along top and across ends, fold over 
to the outside so that the edges are 
exactly over the previous row of stitching. 
Machine around entire band through all 
thicknesses of material. Sew hooks and 
bars to band and close the side opening 
with snap fasteners if a zipper is not used. 
Step 7. Hem: Try skirt on and mark a 
becoming length with chalk or pins, 
measuring up an even distance from floor 
with a skirt-marker or yard-stick. "Remove, 
turn the hem, secure by hand and press 
again. 

Step 8. Buttonholes: Mark position and 
size of each butonhole (which should be a 
trifle larger than the width of buttons) 
on the right-hand side of jacket, and 
arrange for the end of buttonhole to be J 
inch from front edge. Cut binding strips 
| inch wide and J inch longer than size 
of buttonhole. Fold strips in halves length 
wise, press, tack to jacket with raw edges 
meeting exactly over mark and ends ex 



tending an even distance beyond mark. 
Machine along centre of each strip and do 
not take stitching beyond marked line. 
Tie all ends of threads securely on the 
inside. 

Cut along marked line to within \ inch 
of each end and then diagonally to ends 
of stitching. Turn raw edges of binding 
strips to the inside and press with folded 
edges meeting exactly in centre. On the 
inside pin the triangular piece at each end 
to binding strips, fold garment back out 
of the way and machine across each end 
through all thicknesses. Tie threads and 
press again. 

Step 9. Pockets: Mark position of pocket 
openings in the fronts, and apply binding 
strips in exactly the same way as for but 
tonholes, but make these 1 inch wide and 
1 inches longer than the opening. Cut a 
pouch piece for each pocket 1 inches 
wider than the opening and 8 inches long. 
Join one end to binding strip along the 
lower side. Machine along the pocket 
opening just outside the binding along 
lower side only. Fold pouch upwards so 
that the raw edge is just above raw edge 
of the upper binding strip. Tack, machine 
across both ends of pocket along upper 
edge through all thicknesses. Draw threads 
to inside, tie carefully, machine pouch 
together along the sides on the inside and 
press again. 

Step 10. Seams: Pin darts in front and 
back on the inside and machine from 
waistline up to notch. Tie threads and 
press towards centre front and centre 
back. Cut away portion below the waist 
line on back. Join front to back shoulders 
and underarms in plain seams; join under 
arms of sleeves. Press all seams open and 
aeaten raw edges. 

Step 11. Collar and Cuffs: Fold cuffs in 
halves lengthwise, with right sides to 
gether, and machine across ends. Pin 
facing to collar with right sides together, 
machine around outer edge, cut away 
excess seam allowance to within a bare i 
inch of stitching, turn right side out, 
press, trim collar and cuffs with plaid 
material cut on the bias, as shown in illus 
tration. Pin collar to jacket, and cuffs to 
sleeves on the outside. Turn facings 
down the front edges to the outside. 

Cut self-material bias strips 1 inch wide, 
tack to neck edge and join ends to front 
facings in plain seams. Press open and 
machine around the entire neck edge 
through all thicknesses. Tack bias strips 
to sleeves and machine in the same way. 
Cut away excess seam allowance, turn 
facings to inside, press, turn under raw 
edges, and slip-stitch in place. Tack fac 
ings in place down fronts, cut openings in 
facing exactly under each buttonhole, turn 
under raw edges, hem to bindings and 
press again. Sew buttons on left side to 
correspond. 

Step 12. Sleeves and Pads: Pin sleeves 
to armholes with notches meeting and ease 
fulness evenly across top. Provide a piece 
of cotton wool same size as pad, but omit 
seam allowance. Pin to inside of pad and 
draw padding away from outside edges, 
tapering it to nothing at points and keep 
ing it thickest in centre of the longest 
side. Tack together and keep all long 
stitches on the cotton wool side. Pin pad 
ding facing to pad, right sides together 
and machine along two sides. Turn right 
side out, turn under raw edges and over 
sew together. 

Pin pads to jacket with longest side 
extending J inch beyond armhole seam 
[Turn to page 49.1 



48 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 









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CARE. 



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Australian Home Journal, April 1 , 1 949. 



49 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 47. 1 

into sleeve and point in line with shoulder 
scam. Try jacket on and note whether 
shoulder width is becoming and sleeves 
correctly set in. Alter if necessary, unpin 
pads, machine sleeves, press seams open 
across upper half of armnole, replace pads, 
tie-stitch to seam allowance around arm- 
holes and neaten raw edges by overcasting. 

Step 13. Finishing: Cut a fitted facing 2 
inches wide for lower edge of jacket and 
2 inches longer than the openings. Join 
together in one piece and join ends to 
front facings. Pin to jacket with right 
Bides together. Machine exactly on marked 
Beam line across bottom and up and around 
openings. Cut away excess seam allow 
ance, turn facing to inside, press, turn 
under raw edge, machine through fold only 
and hem in place. Press again, trim with 
bows made from the plaid material cut on 
the bias and complete with final pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
3$ yards 54 inches wide. 

[For 34-inch bust, take ^ inch off side 
seams of front and back. For 38-inch bust, 
allow ^ inch on side seams of front and 
back.] ^ t ^ 

FROCK, 7336. 

Step 1. Completing Pattern: 
Bodice. Use pattern provided for 7335 

and fold under the portion below waistline 
on both front and back. 
Cut in a straight line 
through punchholes in 
dicating centre front 
line and also across 
upper edge. If padded 
shoulders are not de 
sired, follow Step 1, 
Pattern 7335. 




Sleeve. Use 
sleeve for Pattern 
7335 and fold 
under portion 
below notches for 
three - quarter 
length. 



IM 






liS 



Tie and Bow Trimming. Cut two strips 
of paper 4 inches wide and long enough to 
extend across front and tie in a bow on 
the left side. Place bodice front over the 
alternate ends and shape to fit armhole. 

Skirt Back. Use pattern given for front 
and fold under 1 inches along the entire 
side. 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: See 
Step 2, Pattern 7335. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: See Step 3, 
Pattern 7335. 

Step 4. Bodice: Lengthen machine stitch 
a trifle and along yoke edges marked 
"Gather", machine on seam line and again 
inch from first stitching on seam allow 
ance. Draw up both threads to a space of 
4 inches. Tie threads and arrange fulness 
in even gathers. Join yoke to correspond 
ing seam edge in plain seams, press with 
allowances together and downwards. Join 
shoulders in plain seams, press open and 
neaten. 

Cut a self -material fitted facing for neck 
edge 1$ inches wide, join at shoulders, 
press open and pin to neck edge of bodice 
with right sides together. Machine exactly 
on marked seam line, cut away excess seam 
allowance, turn to inside, press, turn under 
raw edge, machine through fold only and 
slip-stitch in place. Pin darts in front 
and back, stitch and press. 

Step 5. Trimmings: Cut out as in dia 
gram. Turn a small fold along upper edges 
of trimmings, tack in place exactly over 
machining across yoke and front as far as 
bow position, and from left armhole back 
to bow. Machine, remove tackings. 
Machine a rolled edge around bow and 
lower edges. Make sure armholes 

and trimmings match, and tack together. 
Press. The lower edges of trimming are 
free to allow for pressing and keeping the 
bow uncrushed. Tie ends in an attractive 

bow, as shown. 

Step 6. Joining Skirt to Bodice: Turn 
O under allowance on skirt waistline and 

pin to bodice, tack, machine, press and 

neaten. Pin front and back together at 

sides in plain seams and leave an open- 

ing above notch on left side. Try on 

wearer to observe the fitting and let 
-j out or take in allowance if necessary. 

Eemove, machine seams, press open and 
^ neaten. 

Step 7. Side Opening: Finish as in 

Step 5, Pattern 7335. 

, Step 8. Sleeves: 

Join at under 
arms in plain 
seams, press open 
and neaten; fin 
ish edges with 
self-material bias 
strips 1$ inches 
wide, applied in 
same way as 
neck facing. 

Make sleeve 
pads and apply 
and finish as 
suggested in 
Step 12, Frock 
7335, making 
sure to catch in 
the front trim 
ming at each 
front armhole. 

Step 9. Belt: 
Make belt, finish 
with a buckle 
and apply loops 
at sides to hold 
it in place. 




Step 10. Finishing: Allow frock to hang 
at least 48 hours to give material an oppor 
tunity of stretching evenly. Try on and 
mark an even distance up from floor. Turn 
the hem, secure by hand and complete with 
final pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
2f yards 54 inches wide. 

[For alteration of sizes, see description 
No. 7335..] 


FROCK, 9041. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Collar. Pin bodice back to paper and 
mark a line from one notch through all 
punchholes back to the other notch, and 
use centre back of bodice for centre back 
of collar. Cut out on marked outline. 

Sleeve. See Step 1, Pattern 7335. 

Skirt. Mark off 1$ widths of 36-inch 
material 16^ inches long, 
plus the usual seam and 
hem allowances. This 
length provides for 1 
inch tuck which is placed 
3 inches below waist 
line and takes up 2 
inches of material. 

Strap. Cut this by 
placing bodice 
front to a piece 
of paper and cut 
along front edge, 
across top and 
bottom, and 
through line 
indicated by 
punchholea. 
Step 2. Test- 
Ing Pattern: 
Alter bodice if 
necessary, fol 
lowing sugges 
tions given in 
Step 2, Pattern 
7335. 

Step 3. Cut 
ting Material: 
See Step 3, 
Pattern 7335. 

Step 4. Seams: 
J o % in bodice 
front and back 
together at 
shoulders and 
underarms in plain 
seams, press open 
and neaten. Join 
sleeve seams, press 
and finish lower 
edge in same way 
as those of Pattern 
7336. Join the two 
skirt pieces together, press and neaten. 

Step 5. Strap: Make buttonholes on 
this as in Pattern 7335. Pin the 
right side of strap to the inside of the 
right-hand side of bodice. Machine, turn 
strap to outside, turn under raw edge, 
machine in place and press. Cut openings 
in bodice under each buttonhole and finish 
as in Step 11, Pattern 7335. Turn under 
seam allowance on left side, press, turn 
under raw edge, machine in place, lap right 
side over left with centre front lines 
exactly over each other and tack in place. 

Step 6. Collar and Sleeves: Face collar 
and apply to frock as collar of Pat 
tern 7335. Apply sleeves to armholes 
with seam of sleeve meeting seam of 
bodice. Tack, machine, press and neaten. 

Step 7. Skirt: Fold the 1 inch tuck in 
place 3$ inches below waistline, press, 
[Turn to page 50.] 




50 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 






OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 49."] 

machine 1 inch up from fold. Gather 
upper edge of skirt to fit lower edge of 
bodice, using two rows of gathering to 
hold fulness 
evenly in place. 

Turn under 
lower edge of bod 
ice, pin to skirt 
and machine as 
close as possible 
to seam edge. Sew 
buttons on left 
side to correspond 
with buttonholes. 

Try on, mark a 
becoming length, 
turn the hem, 
secure by hand 
and complete with 
final pressing. 

Pattern is for a 
child 8 years. Ma 
terial: If yards 
36 inches wide. 
Contrast: yard 
36 inches wide. 





TUCK 






3AJHER TO FIT BODICE 



TUCK - I INCH WVDE. 



SKIRT 

ONE & A HALF WIDTHS 
36 INCH MATERIAL 

-ie z INCHES PI.US HEM 



Dance Frock. 

We noted a 
dance frock that 
deserves special 
mention. It was in 
banana coloured 
crepe with bright 
bands of satin 
veiled in lace. An 
other one was in 
a deep turquoise 
to tone, shaped 
adroitly to look 
simple, very full, 
of double layer 
pink net no less, 
with huge ruche 
of the net for a 
border. 



Reindeer Sports- lumper 

JL \jf JL 

[From page 9."] 

Bow 26 p. 7 B., 2 W., 2 E., 2 W., 17 E., 
2 W., 6 E., 1 W., 35 E., 1 W., 6 E., 2 W., 
17 E., 2 W., 2 E., 2 W., 7 E. 

Bow 27 k. 2 tog. E., 5 E., 3 W., 1 E., 
2 W., 17 E., 2 W., 6 E., 1 W., 35 E., 1 W., 
6 E., 2 W., 17 E., 2 W., 1 E., 3 W., 5 E., 
k. 2 tog. E. 

Bow 28 p. 5 E., 4 W., 1 E., 4 W., 15 E., 

2 W., 5 E., 2 W., 35 E., 2 W., 5 E., 2 W., 
15 E., 4 W., 1 E., 4 W., 5 E. 

Bow 20 k. 2 tog. E., 2 E., 4 W., 1 E., 
5 W., 14 E., 3 W., 4 E., 2 W., 37 E., 2 W., 
4 E., 3 W., 14 E., 5 W., 1 E., 4 W., 2 E., 
k. 2 tog. E. 

Bow 30 p. 2 E., 11 W., 13 E., 4 W., 
4 E., 1 W., 39 E., 1 W., 4 E., 4 W., 13 E., 
11 W., 2 E. 

Bow 31 k. 2 tog. E., 13 W., 3 E., 2 W., 
1 E., 4 W., 8 E., 2 W., 39 E., 2 W., 8 E., 4 W., 
1 E., 2 W., 3 E., 13 W., k. 2 tog. E. 

Bow 32 p 1 E., 13 W., 1 E., 5 W., 1 E., 

3 W., 1 E., 8 W., 41 E., 8 W., 1 E., 3^V\, 

1 E., 5 W., 1 E., 13 W., 1 E. 

Bow 33 k. 1 E., 12 W., 1 E., 7 W., 1 E., 

11 W., 41 E., 11 W., 1 E., 7 W., 1 E., 

12 W., 1 E. 

Bow 34 p. 2 E., 10 W., 1 E., 8 W., 1 E., 

4 W., 55 E., 4 W., 1 E., 8 W., 1 E., 10 W., 

2 E. 



Bow 35 k. 3 E., 8 W., 1 E., 9 W., 1 E., 
6 W., 1 E., 2 W., 45 E., 2 W., 1 E., 6 W., 
1 E., 9 W., 1 E., 8 W., 3 E. 

Bow 36 p. 3 E., 8 W., 1 E., 10 W., 1 E., 

6 W., 1 E., 2 W., 43 E., 2 W., 1 E., 6 W., 
1 E., 10 W., 1 E., 8 W., 3 E. 

Bow 37 k. 4 E., 18 W., 1 E., 6 W., 1 E., 

3 W., 41 E., 3 W., 1 E., 6 W., 1 E., 18 W., 

4 E. 

Bow 38 p. 5 E., 24 W., 1 E., 3 W., 41 E., 
3 W., 1 E., 24 W., 5 E. 

Bow 39 k. 7 E., 27 W., 39 E., 27 W., 

7 E. 

Bow 40 p. 10 E., 24 W., 39 E., 24 W., 
10 E. 

Bow 41 k. 13 E., 21 W., 39 E., 21 W., 
13 E. 

Bow 42 p. 15 E., 7 W., 3 E,, 9 W., 39 E., 
9 W.. 3 E., 7 W., 15 E. 

Bow 43 k. 25 E., 9 W., 39 E., 9 W., 

25 E. 

Bow 44 p. 26 E., 8 W., 39 E., 8 W., 

26 E. 

Bow 45 k. 27 E., 7 W., 39 E., 7 W., 

27 E. 

Bow 46 p. 28 E., 5 W., 41 E., 5 W., 

28 E. 

Bow 47 k. 28 E., 5 W., 41 E., 5 W., 
28 E. 

Bow 48 p. 28 E., 6 W., 39 E., 6 W., 

28 E. 

Bow 49 k. 29 E., 8 W., 33 E., 8 W., 

29 E. 

Bow 50 p. 29 E., 8 W., 33 E., 8 W., 
29 E. 
BOW 51 k. 29 E., 10 W., 29 E., 10 W., 

29 E, 

Bow 52 p. 30 E., 9 W., 29 E., 9 W., 

30 E. 

Bow 53 k. 30 E., 9 W., 29 E., 9 W., 

30 E. 

Bow 54 p. 30 E., 6 W.. 1 E., 1 W., 

39 E., 1 W., 1 E., 6 W., 80 E. 

Bow 55 k. 31 E., 6 W., 33 E., 6 W., 

31 E. 

Bow 56 p. 31 E., 1 W., 1 E., 3 W., 
35 E., 3 W., I E., 1 W., 31 E. 

Bow 57 k. 29 E., 3 W., 1 E., 2 W., 
37 E., 2 W., 1 E., 3 W., 29 E. 

Bow 58 p. 29 E., 3 W., 3 E., 2 W., 
35 E., 2 W., 1 E., 3 W., 29 E. 

Bow 59 k. 28 E., 3 W., 4 E., 1 W., 
35 E., 1 W., 4 E., 3 W., 28 E. 

Bow 60 p. 28 E., 1 W., 6 E., 1 W., 
35 E., 1 W., 6 E., 1 W., 28 E. 

Bow 61 k. 35 E., 1 W., 35 E., 1 W., 
35 E. 

Bow 62 p. in red. 

Work 6 rows in stocking-st., weaving 
the white wool at back of work; then 
shape neck and shoulders as follows: 
k. 40 sts., cast off 27 sts. loosely, k. remain 
ing 40 sts. Continue in stocking-st. on 
last 40 sts., decreasing 1 st. at neck edge 
every row until there are 36 sts; work on 
these 36 sts. until armhole is 6^ inches 
(measure on the straight) ; then cast off 
9 sts. when commencing the row at arm- 
hole edge four times. Eeturn to remaining 

40 sts. and work to match side just com 
pleted. 

The Back. 

Work exactly as given for front to row 
12 of vandyke stripe. Work four rows in 
stocking-st., weaving the white wool at 
back of work. Cast off 6 sts. at beginning 
of next two rows; then k. 2 tog. at both 
ends of the needle each alternate row until 
there are 107 sts. Work without shaping 
until armhole is 6J inches. Shape back 
of neck and shoulders thus: k. 38 sts., 
cast off 31 sts., k. 38 sts. On the last 38 
sts. continue shaping of k. 2 tog. at neck 
edge every row until there are 36 sts., 
then cast off 9 sts. at beginning of every 



row at armhole edge four times. Eeturn 
to remaining 38 sts. and work to match. 
Sleeve. 

Using No. 12 needles, cast on 52 sts, 
with red wool and work in a ribbing of 
k. 2, p. 2 for 3$ inches. Purl one row, 
increasing to 72 sts. 

Change to No. 10 needles and work the 
triangle pattern rows as given at com 
mencement of front of juniper. Taking 
care to keep continuity of pattern, in 
crease 1 st. at both ends of the needle in 
the 10th and every following 6th row 
until there are 106 sts., working the new 
sts. into the pattern as they appear. Con 
tinue without shaping until sleeve is 18$ 
inches, then shape top by casting off 6 sts. 
at beginning of next two rows; then k. 2 
tog. at both ends of the needle every 
alternate row until there are 30 sts. Cast 
off loosely. Make other sleeve exactly the 
same. 

To Make Up. 

Press carefully with a hot iron over a 
damp cloth. Sew up under-arm, sleeve 
and right shoulder seams. Sew left shoulder 
seam together 1 inch, commencing from 
armhole edge. 

With right side of work towards you, 
pick up the sts. along front edge; work 
three rows in stocking-st. and cast off. 
Slip-stitch back to make a hem. Pick up 
the sts. along the back edge and knit four 
rows and cast off. Sew in sleeves, placing 
seam at under-arm. Using No. 12 needles 
and from right side of work, pick up and 
knit all the sts. round neckline; then work 
in a ribbing of k. 2, p. 2 for 1J inches. 
Cast off loosely ribwise from wrong side 
of work. Fasten shoulder opening with 
tiny press studs or hoops. 



LONDON TOWN JUMPER 

[From page 43.] 

wool to inside edge of remaining sts. 1st 
row K. 18 E., 3 W., 17 E. 2nd row P. 
17 E., 3 W., 18 E. 3rd row K. 2 tog. E., 
16 E., 3 W., 17 E. 4th row P. 17 E., 
3 W., 17 E. 5th row K. 2 tog. E., 15 E., 
3 W., 17 E. 6th row P. 18 E., 1 W., 17 
E. 7th row K. 2 tog., 15 E., 1 W., 18 E. 
8th row P. 18 E., 1 W., 16 E. Now cont. 
in K. only, and finish to match other side. 
The Sleeves. 

Cast on 80 sts. with E. wool and No. 12 
needles and work in a k. 1, p. 1 rib for 
2 ins. Change to No. 10 needles and st.-st., 
inc. 1 st. at each end of next and every 
following 6th row until there are 100 sts. 
Cont. until sleeve measures 6 ins. Shape 
top: Cast off 5 sts. at beg. of next 2 rows, 
then dec. 1 st. at each end of every k. row 
until 20 sts. remain. Cast off. 

Using No. 12 needles and E. wool, pick 
up and k. sts. round front neck and work 
in a k. 1, p. 1 rib for 1 in. Cast off. Pick 
up sts. across back and work to match. 
Sew up all seams. 



A visitor coming to town for the Eoyal 
Show wants to know what is the correct 
amount to expend in tips. If staying at 
a hotel you should be prepared to spend 
ten per cent, of your hotel bill in tips to 
housemaid, porter, dining-room waiter, lift 
man, etc. Distribute this in proportion to 
the service given at the end of your visit. 
Do not tip for individual hotel meals. If 
you dine at a restaurant, allow ten per 
cent, of the bill as a waiter s tip. 
* 

A free country is one in which there is 
no particular individual to blame for the 
existing tyranny. 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



51 





"Dri-Glo" Naps 
for baby s comfort 

"Dri-Glo" are famous for their Mwnderftltiv luxuri 
ous bath towels. And now they are making the 
softest naps for baby. ()nl\ the finest super-quality 
cotton beautifully bleached and one hundred per 
cent, hygienic goes into these "Dri-Glo" baby 
naps. That means they are read) for instant use. 



And they re so super-soft and cushiony, so highly 
absorbent they protect bab> against all changes of 
climate. 

Knowing how many times they have to be washed, 
we make our "Dri-Glo" naps in extra-strong double- 
warp \arii. with a special non-fray edge that won t 
go " raggy" with washing. That s why Dri-Glo" 
outlast any other naps for wear. 

-itlo" also ma lie spcrinl super-soft 
nursery towels for baby. 



Available at Stores throughout Australia 



Printed by John Sands Pty. Ltd., Druitt St., Sydney, and Published bv lames RuaselLfor 



52 



Australian Home Journal, April 1, 1949. 



CLrnotts 



FAMOUS 





The most pleasant break in every school day is playtime and the school lunch. There s a tasty 
snack then to be enjoyed, so make that snack Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits. 

There i* no Substitute for Quality! 
for your 2SM e Monday. Wednesday and Friday. 7.15 Dm. " Arnott s Milk 



enjoyment 



2SM every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 7.15 p.m. 
2KY every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 7.30 p.m. 
2CH every Tuesday and Thursday, 7.45 p.m. 



Arrowroot Melodies 



SKILL TO DO COMES OF DOING 



u 



T 



HOMEJ 




URNAL 



Registered at 

the G.P.O., 

Sydney, for / 

transmission 

by post as a / 

Newspaper. 



MAY 2nd, 
1949 





7337 



7338 

These 
Patterns 

Enclosed 




7339 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Breeze through bathroom cleaning 




EASY WAY/ 




Say "good-bye" to dulling scratches that 
catch and hold onto dirt and make your 
cleaning harder. Fine, white Bon Ami 
cleans without harmful grit. No hard 
scrubbing. No red, rough hands. No gritty 
particles left behind. 

When you clean with Bon Ami you get a 



Bon Ami 



polish, too. Baths and sinks sparkle with 
bright lustre and keep that shiny, "new" 
look longer. Bon Ami is best for windows 
and mirrors. Just wipe on. Wipe off. And 
the job s all done. Buy Bon Ami either 
Powder or Cake to-day. 
See how it speeds all 
your household cleaning. 




THE SPEEDY CLEANSER that 

/ 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



The Velvet Cravat. 

The velvet cravat is such a useful and 
smart accessory. Worn with any type of 
suit especially charming with the soft 
dressmaker suit. Made in velvet it can 
look particularly smart say, black or 
cherry velvet on a light fawn or grey suit. 




Quite easily made. First make a straight 
double strip to fit the neck (as sketch B). 
Then a wide double strip about 14 inches 
long and 8 inches wide (when doubled), 
as sketch C. Gather up and sew on to 
band B where crosses are shown. Sew on 
top side, so the gathered frill hangs softly 
over, as clearly shown in sketch D. 
*-- 

Scarfs. 

Scarfs of infinite variety have again 
crept into fashion news; in fact they have 
already become very popular, being one 
of those fashions which take on because 
they are both practical and becoming. 
A: For day wear, a plain scarf on a pat 
terned frock is most effective, or a check 
or striped scarf on a plain frock is smart 
ness. 




B: Glamorous and 
romantic is a chiffon scarf, 
worn in the evening. C: The old- 
world cross-over style, edged with fringe. 
When not wearing your scarf, it makes a 
lovely splash of colour draped over your 
arm. All you need is a straight length of 
material. To line the scarf with a different 
shade is also most attractive. Wear a 
scarf, round your shoulder, tucked into 
your belt, or over your head Sari fashion. 



The Vest they don t 
grow out of . . 




Little girls shoot up like corn 
stalks. They grow out of their 
clothes so fast it s hard to keep 
up with them. 

That s why Bond s make their 
Tru-sife Vests for children with 
added length. 

They fashion their Vests 
and matching panties too 
from Dreamglo cotton interlock 



or unshrinkable wool and rayon 
. . . long-wearing fabrics that 
come up smiling, washing after 
washing. 

* That TRU-SIZE label you 
find on all Bond s underwear 
is your guarantee of fit. It 
means that every garment is 
true-to-size. 



BOND S TRU-SIZE UNDERWEAR FOR CHILDREN 



CU3A 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




ROSS and ROBERT BRYANT, of 23 The Avenue. Hurstville. 

Dear Sirs, Enclosed you will find a photograph of my two sons, 
Robert David, aged 5 years, and Ross John, aged 2 years. 
I think you will agree with me they are a credit to your won 
derful Biscuits, which they never tire of eating. I strongly 
recommend Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits to all mothers with 
young children. My mother gave them to her eight children, 
tob. 

(Signed) Mrs. D. Bryant. 



MILK ARROWROOT 

BISCUITS 



There is no Substitute for Quality ! 




Old-time Father: 

From Amelia: "I am a girl of neaily 17 
years, and my father objects to me going 
to dances. Mother doesn t mind, but father 
is adamant. Other girls of my age and 
younger go to these dances which are more 
in the nature of dancing classes than a 
social event. What can I do? I am grow 
ing up and father is so old-fashioned that 
he has become a spoil-sport. He himself is 
a good man, but frightfully narrow and 
bosses mum and the rest of us."- There 
are still, unfortunately, some of these mid- 
Victorian fathers about, and though they 
may not wear the impressive side levers 
or other facial herbage of the old times, 
they strut about pompously, and are under 
the delusion that everything they do is 
right, and that other people are wrong The 
trouble with them is that they don t grow 
up and they don t know it. 

I remember some years ago a school 
master and schoolmasters and school 
teachers are definitely in a class by them 
selves who had three beautiful daughters 
much sought after by the local 
lads; well brought up boys of good char 
acter and education. Somewhere about 
half-past eight the schoolmaster would put 
his head into the drawingroom where the 
girls would be having a sing-song with 
boy-friends, and say in a cultured and well 
modulated voice: "Grace, Edith and Janet, 
we are now having family worship. If 
your friends would like to join us, they 
will be very welcome." The youths did not 
appreciate this kind and sincere invitation, 
with the result that they ceased visiting 
the house. That was a considerable number 
of years ago. The schoolmaster is dead; 
so are his daughters, and they all died 
spinsters. 

That is not a parallel case, but it shows 
how parents mistakenly may do their 
children a deal of harm. Why not, "Amelia", 
get some older and more broadminded 
friend to talk to your father and bring 
him out of his dream world. The idea of 
a girl nearly 17 being barred from going 
to a dancing class or social is just old- 
time piffle. Do not disobey your father 
but be persistent in asking his permission, 
and get your girl friends to help you. Why 
not show dad this paragraph? , He maj 
take a good laugh at himself. 

The Placid Man: 

"Is there anything that can move th& 
placid type of man. I am naturally vola 
tile, fond of excitement and love change 
of atmosphere. My husband is the most 
regular individual you can meet. Goes to 
work at the same time every day and 
returns at the same time. He is quiet and 
methodical, and I cannot get him out of 

his stick-in-the-mud ways." Vera B. 

Why try? If you were married to the vol 
canic type of man he would tire you out 
quickly, and between you, with your love 
of excitement, and his energetic restless 
ness, you would both be nervous wreck 
cases in a very short time. Be thankful 
you have got your placid man, who is 
evidently also a good meal ticket. With 
a little tactfulness on your part, and a 
fair amount of gumption, your married life 
should run along smooth lines. There are 
thousands of women who would like to 
change places with you. 

A Drinker: 

"I am engaged to a man who is a heavy 
drinker and a flirt. My friends say I am 
only looking for trouble and that I ought 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



perfectly candid with you, I love him in 
spite of these handicaps. What should I 
do?" Why not go along and put your 
problem to a psychiatrist? He, I take it, 
would talk to you in a brutally candid 
way. If you are looking for trouble, and 
lots of it, marry your boose-hound and 
Don Juan. 

The Other Woman: 

"I read your answer to the man whose 
wife won t give him a divorce in order 
that he may marry the other woman, and 
thus forces him to live in sin . Cases of 
this kind can be different. I am married 
and have three lovely children four, six 
and nine years. My husband has become 
infatuated with another woman, and I 
know he spends money and time with her. 
What am I to do? Get a divorce and have 
myself and children on the near-breadline? 
At present my husband allows me sufficient 
to run the home and clothe the^ children; 
they arc more than tfe itself to me. Their 
father knows I am aware he is untrue to 
me, and so for the sake of the children, 
though we are polite to each other, we 
lead our separate lives. To some folks the 
position would be intolerable. I am hope 
ful that things may alter. I pray nightly 
that this liaison may end, or failing that 
that I may live long enough to see my 
children grow up and be happily married." 

Sufferer. There are always two sides 

to every question and we gladly print 
"Sufferer s" letter. The case we referred 
to* was that of an avowedly Christian 
woman, well-to-do, and who had a hand 
some separation allowance sanctioned by 
the Court. There were no children involved; 
yet this woman would not consent to the 
separation being turned into a divorce 
decree, and thus caused her husband and 
the other woman to continue to "live in 
sin". This, we said, savoured of the dog- 
in-the-manger, and was unchristianlike 
conduct. In "Sufferer s" case we think she 
is, in all the circumstances, pursuing a 
wise course. Very often these irregular 
affairs end suddenly when the lady in the 
case finds what the Americans call a 
better "sugar daddy", or the couple quarrel 
between themselves. There are many, kinds 
of possibilities that can happen to break 
up an irregular attachment. 



The Auditor-General has reported to 
Parliament that during the year 1947- 
1948 52 public servants were responsible 
for deficiencies totalling 17,583. Of this 
5,427 was recovered. Thefts, robberies 
and frauds cost the Commonwealth 
72,085. 



Anxious mothers are advised to put into 
the pocket of their children s coats a card 
with their name and address on it when 
they are travelling either alone or in com 
pany. 

AUSTRALIAN HOME JOURNAL 
BABY BOOK No 5. 

All that is latest and best in Knitting 
and Crochet for Baby, clearly illustrated 
with instructions set out in the simplest 
way possible. It consists of: Pram Suit 
for the Baby Girl; Knitted Shell Set; Pram 
Cover; Roseleaf Layette; Mauryeen Cro 
chet Set; Coat and Bonnet, Bubble Stitch; 
The Berry and Leaf Set; Alice Baby Set; 
Pamela Outfit; The Graham Suit; Baby s 
Shawl; Jessica Coat and Bonnet; Billie- 
Boy, Outdoor Suit. Price 1/3 (by Postal 
Note) to Australian Home Journal, 407- 
409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. 




BUT NEVER ILL 




FAMILY HEALTH RULE KEEPS RHEUMATISM AT BAY 

"It s more years than we care to remember since an old friend of my husband s 
family put us on to the habit of taking the small daily dose of Kruschen Salts. 
Since then we ve scarcely had a day s illness certainly nothing serious. When we 
hear of friends of our own age suffering with rheumatism and old people s 
complaints we realise just how much we owe to Kruschen. 

"/ can assure you we are a family of confirmed 
Kruschen regulars. 

"We only have one daughter, who we started off on our 
daily health rule about the time she came of age. Her 
radiant health and energy are the envy of her friends. She s 
to be married shortly, and I feel sure that that will be the 
beginning of another household of Kruschen regulars ." 




CLEANSE YOUR SYSTEM 
OF POISONOUS WASTES 

The world s best health assurance is to 
always place paramount importance on keep 
ing your system free of poisonous wastes 
which, if retained, may seep into the blood 
stream and lead to painful rheumatic ailments. 
Kruschen s skilful combination of six salts 
stimulates the liver and washes out the kidneys 
and helps them to keep the system cleansed 
of poisonous wastes. 



TWO WAYS TO TAKE 
KRUSCHEN 

Medicinal Dose. Sufferers -from severe muscular 
pains and aching joints of rheumatism, lumbago, 
etc., need one teaspoonful of Kruschen taken daily 
in a tumbler of hot water before breakfast. 

"Little Daily Dose." As much Kruschen as would 
cover a sixpence is tasteless in the first morning 
cup of tea or coffee. Yet it has a stimulating tonic 
effect, tones up the system, corrects constipation. 




SALTS 



The Tonic Effect of Kruschen 

Keeps Millions of People Fit! 




K22.AHJ. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



THOUSANDS Learn to Make 

. LOVELY CLOTHES 
at HOME-this New Easy Way 

Amazing NEW SIMPLIFIED METHOD brings expert 
HOME DRESSMAKING ability to EVERY woman and 
girl. 

So unique so streamlinedso simple it teaches you in 
FEW WEEKS, in your OWN HOME by latest SHORT 
CUT METHODS, all the SECRETS of DRESSMAKING- 
MEASURING, DESIGNING, CUTTING and 
PROFESSIONAL FINISHING. 

SAVE 50 THIS YEAR 

You can start to-day to possess a wardrobe 
full of lovely clothes at so little cost. 
Something NEW for every occasion. You 
can save pounds upon pounds on children s 
clothes. You can re-make and renovate. 
ANYONE can learn the fascinating art of 
Modern Dressmaking by these astoundingly 
Simplified and Practical Methods. 

FREE ADVICE SERVICE 

This course carries a FREE ADVICE 
SERVICE. At any time, and on any point, 
you may write to the Ross Kynes College, 
Sydney, and will receive a prompt and full 
reply just as you would in a class. No other 
course in Australia can give you this service. 




IN DRESSMAKING 




Mr. Ross Hynes, 
Principal of the Ross 
Hynes College of Dress 
making, Sydney, is 
recognised as the leading 
authority on style and 
clothes. 

Mr. Hynes has con 
densed his 5/5/0 class 
instruction course into a 
home course so thai every 
woman and girl can 
enjoy the same modern 
instruction. 

COMPLETE HOME TUITION COURSE 

FULL COURSE 
ONLY 

The "Home Dressmaker" is not just a "book on dressmaking." It is a 
complete course which shows you everything in a new, practical, easy- 
to-follow way. No matter where you live, Mr. Ross Hynes remarkable 
new Home Dressmaking Course brings Sydney instruction right to your 
own home. Everything is-explained for you. There are 160 illustrations. 
You cannot make a mistake. Mr. Ross Hynes is a Dressmaking tutor of 
International repute. He has discovered this amazingly simplified a-nd 
practical method of instruction after 20 years experience. There is 
nothing like it in Australia. 

FARM MftNFY AT HOMF When y u have made al1 
cai\r& munci HI iunc. the Cloth 7 es you need yourself 

you will find many friends who will gladly pay for your services. Your 
spare time will bring you exrta money for dress materials-, holidays and 
other pleasures. 

STRICT MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. t u ^ 

penny. If you are not entirely satisfied in every way that you 
will become a successful dressmaker you may return the "Home 
Dressmaker" within 10 days and your money will be fully refunded. 

FREE! MASTER FOUNDATION PATTERN 
with this Edition. Order your copy now ! 

The Mister Foundation Pattern enables you to cut your own paper 
patterns in any style and in 16 different sizes. It is the most astounding 
invention that has ever come to dressmaking and completely eliminates all 
charts and drafting. By ordering your course of the "Home Dressmaker" 
now, you will receive this 5/- Master Foundation Pattern absolutely free. 



POST THIS COUPON IMMEDIATELY !. 



The Rpss Hynes Home Dressmaker, Mail Cept., G.P.O. Box 3503, Sydney, N.S.W. 
Dear Sir, 

Please send me your complete Ross Hynes Home Dressmaker course with 
Free Master Foundation Pattern. I understand that if after 10 days I am not 
entirely satisfied that this course is all that is claimed of it I may return it and 
my money will be refunded in full. 

NAME K you haven t the 

money just now, 

ADDRESS send only 5/- and 

a course will be 

reserved for you. 

(AHJ S/49) 



To Correspondents 

[The columns of this department for the answers to 
correspondents are designed to prove of genuine help and 
benefit to readers who desire information concerning 
matters of dress, housekeeping, etiquette, the toilet, or 
hygiene. In addition to the proper signature (which will 
never be published under any circumstances) , corre 
spondents are requested to send a pen-name, to which 
the answer may be addressed.] 

NEW BOOTS. A simple remedy for new 
leather boots which will not polish is to 
rub them -with half a lemon, and leave 
until thoroughly dry before cleaning. The 
application may be repeated on-ce or twice 
to still further improve them. Mother. 

HOME TYPEWRITING. "I have a type 
writer at home and intend taking some 
typing in, but don t know what prices to 
charge for such work. Perhaps you can 

help me?" E.S. The usual price is 3d. 

per folio of 72 words. If one carbon copy 
is also wanted the overall charge would 
be 4d. per folio. ^ 

COCONUT FRUIT BALLS. Ingredients: i 
Ib. of glace cherries, \ Ib. of icing sugar, 
2 ozs. of desiccated coconut, 1 teaspoonful 
of lemon juice, white of egg. Cut the 
cherries in small pieces, mix them with the 
sugar finely sifted, add the coconut and 
lemon juice and enough white of egg to 
form a stiff paste. Leave it for an hour or 
two in a warm room. Then dip your 
fingers in icing sugar and form the paste 
into balls. Roll them in coconut mixed 
with a little caster sugar and leave to dry. 
Miss L. M. 

BORGIA. Lucrezia Borgia was a sister of 
Caesar Borgia. Her fat-her gave her in 
marriage to a nephew of the King of 
Naples, who was murdered by her brother s 
assassins. She then married the Duke of 
Ferrara. She was celebrated for her beauty, 
and has been accused of many enormities. 
All this happened over 400 years ago. 
Student. 

ORANGE SOUFFLE. Peel and cut four 
oranges, removing seeds. Add one cupful 
of sugar and pour into glass dish. Then 
blend two tablespoonsful cornflour with a 
little milk, placing the remainder of one 
pint of milk in saucepan. When almost 
boiling, add the cornflour and cook five 
minutes. Remove, add \ cupful of sugar, 
yolks of two eggs and pinch of salt. Add 
one heaped tablespoonful of sugar and 
beat again. Pile on top of mixture. Serve 
perfectly cold. Marie. 

GREASE SPOTS. To clean grease spots 
before painting a wall, wash over smoky 
or greasy parts with saltpetre, or very thin 
lime whitewash. If so-apsuds are used, 
they must be washed off thoroughly, as 
they prevent the paint from drying hard. 
F.F.T. 

FRANKENSTEIN. This is not a word of 
German origin. It really meams any crea 
ture that brings anxiety or disaster to its 
author. It is from the Frankenstein 
romance by Mrs. Shelley. A student cre 
ated a soulless monster, purely animal and 
powerful for evil, that eventually killed 
its creator. Miss D. D. 

ROSE PUNCH is very pretty at an informal 
debutante dance. Over a cake of ice in 
the punch bowl empty a pint bottle of 
raspberry juice and enough sparkling white 
grape juice to produce a pale rose tint. 
Scatter a few rose petals over the surface 
of the punch and serve with very tiny 
watercress sandwiches and little pink iced 
cakes, decorated with candles, rose petals 
or mint leaves. "Bnlli Girl." 

HOME OF GOLF. St. Andrew s, in Fife- 
shire, Scotland, is especially famed as the 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



"home of golf", where the Koyal and 
Ancient Club, with its splendid links, is 
located. It has numerous interesting 
historic ruins. No reflection on the golfers 
intended. Fred. S. 

CHEBBY AND PINEAPPLE CAP. Seed a 
quart of large, sweet cherries, and shred 
the pulp of a pineapple. Mix the cherries 
and pineapple with \ cupful of sugar, and 
chill. Keep cool on ice until ready to 
serve. Just before serving, pour over the 
fruit \ cupful of lemon juice and \ cupful 
or orange juice mixed with \ cupful of 
sugar. Serve in punch cups. 

FINNAN HADDIE RAREBIT (Serves six). 
\\ Ibs. finnan haddie, 1 cupful cream, 5 
cupful milk, \\ cupsful grated cheese, 2 
teaspoonsful Worcestershire sauce, 3 eggs 
(slightly beaten), toast. Cover finnan 
haddie with water and let stand 1 hour; 
drain, cover with fresh water, and simmer 
until tender. Drain again, cool, remove 
bones, and flake. Add flaked fish to cream, 
milk, cheese and Worcestershire sauce. 
Season with salt if desired. Heat in top 
of double boiler until cheese melts. Add 
eggs and stir constantly until thick^ Serve 
at once on hot toast. "Set Up." 

PBICKLY HEAT. Dress lightly, removing 
flannels. Bathe in cool (not cold) water, 
often enough to remove the irritating 
perspiratory secretions. After the bath, 
dry the skin with soft towels. If the 
itching is excessive, apply lotions contain 
ing one teaspoonful of saleratus to a pint 
of water. If the eruption covers the 
entire surface of the body, take a bath in 
tepid water containing from two to four 
ounces of washing soda. MBS. L. 

CABBAGE- APPLE SALAD. Mix together 
well 1 cupful of shredded cabbage, \ cup 
ful of shredded or diced apple, \ teaspooa- 
ful of mustard, i teaspoonful of salt, \ 
tablespoonful of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of 
lemon juice, a sprinkling of cayenne pep 
per, and 2 tablespoonsful of cream. Set 
in a cool place until ready to serve. Yield: 
two half-cupful servings. Miss G. M. 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY. "I am told that 
Oxford University comprises a large num 
ber of colleges. Can you tell me the names 

of some of them?" Student. Here they 

are: Balliol, Exeter, Merton, Oriel, Queen s 
New, Lincoln, All Souls, Magdalen, Brasen- 
ose, Corpus Christi, Christ Church, Trinity, 
St. John s, Jesus, Wadham, Pembroke, 
Worcester, Hertford, Keble, St. Edmund 
Hall; 5 Women s Societies. 

BANANA PUFFS. Quarter pint of water, 
1 oz. butter, 3 ozs. flour (plain), 2 eggs. 
Boil water with the butter, stir in flou-r, 
and beat until smooth. Let it cool a little, 
then add eggs, one at a time, and beat 
well. Put a dessertspoonful on greased 
slides for each puff. Cook in moderate 
oven until golden brown, about 25 min 
utes generally. When cool, fill with the 
following mixture: 1 oz. cornflour, \ oz. 
sugar, barley, \ pint of milk, 1 egg, 3 
bananas. Boil the milk, add cornflour 
previously mixed with milk, add sugar. 
Boil three minutes, and then add beaten 
egg and banana pulped. Miss O E. 



KNITTED AND CROCHET TOYS. 
We have published a booklet which 
will be appreciated by those interested in 
knitted and crochet toys. Full instructions 
and illustrations are given for the follow 
ing: The Duck; A Cuddlesome Pup; Our 
Fluffy Lamb; Christmas Doll Set, compris 
ing Coat, Dress, Boottees, Bonnet, Singlet 
and Pitchers; Eddie, the Elephant; Knitted 
Lamb; Jumbo in Crochet; Poodle Purse; 
Humpty Dumpty; Mickey Mouse. The 
ideal instruction book for toy-makers and 
Red Cross workers. Send I/- postal note 
for a CODV. 




The Doctor Answers 

Patient: "But why should I have Rheumatism, Doctor?" 

Doctor: "Well, Rheumatism can be caused by two things: 
an injury to a joint or muscle or by an accumulation 
of poisons in the blood stream which is a condition 
we call toxaemia. Thousands of people like yourself, 
in the last few years, have overworked and neg 
lected their health, letting poisons collect in the 
blood stream so that the ranks of sufferers from 
Rheumatism have increased enormously." 

Patient: "But, Doctor, how do these poisons accumulate?" 

Doctor: "Your blood is constantly flowing through your 
kidneys to be purified from uric acid and other 
poisons. If your kidneys fail to do this, these poisons circulate back through 
your body and collect in the muscles and joints, causing the aches and 
pains that most people call Rheumatism." 

Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids help drive out the crippling poisons from your blood 
stream that are the cause of Rheumatic aches and pains; your kidneys are cleansed 
and strengthened and you get a new feeling of good health and energy. 

If you suffer from Rheumatic pains, backache, sciatica, lumbago, kidney and bladder 
weaknesses, neuritis, gout, etc., start a course of Menthoids right away. 

Get a month s treatment flask of Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids for 6/6 with Diet Chart, 
or a 12-day flask for 3/6, from your nearest chemist or store, or a postal note to 
British Medical Laboratories, Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney, will bring you Menthoids 
by return mail. 

MENTHOIDS FOR RHEUMATISM 



HER RHEUMATISM GOES AS SHE LOSES UGLY FAT 

Great London Hospital endorses famous Youth-0-Form 

"For many years," says Mrs. Fitzpatrick, "I have been crippled with rheumatism, 
until some friends recommended me to take Youth-O-Form to reduce my weight. 
I DID REDUCE and, more marvellous still, my rheumatism completely disappeared. 
That was four years ago. The London winter I find very severe, and this year I 
got rheumatism badly again, and all the prescriptions were useless. I told my doctor, 
who is leading physician at one of the big hospitals here, that Youth-O-Form was 
the only thing that ever did me any good, and he advised me to try it again, and 
that the Youth-O-Form prescription was 
well known. Once again I am quite well 
and fit." 

If you are overweight and 

suffer from Rheumatism, 

Indigestion, Constipation, 

or constant headaches, 

Youth-O-Form will help 

you, too. 

Mrs. Darley, pictured below, is only 
one of countless Australian women 
who have regained health and appear- 
x ance through Youth-O-Form. 



WHAT YOU SHOULD WEIGH 


Height 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-40 


ft. in. 


st Ib. 


st. Ib. 


st. Ib. 


st. Ib. 


St. ll> 


4 11 


7 5 


7 8 


7 11 


8 


8 3 


5 


7 7 


7 10 


7 13 


8 2 


8 5 


5 1 


7 9 


7 12 


8 1 


8 4 


8 7 


5 2 


7 12 


8 1 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


5 3 


8 1 


8 4 


8 6 


8 9 


8 13 


5 4 


8 4 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


5 5 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


9 7 


5 6 


8 11 


9 


9 3 


9 7 


9 11 


5 7 


9 1 


9 4 


.9 7 


9 11 


10 1 


5 8 


9 5 


9 8 


9 11 


10 1 


10 5 


Add lib. for every five years ever forty. 



jrWcof Austcpli an 

Mcf/ier 

. Height: 5ft.Tins> 

Weight : 122 Ib. 



I Youth-O-Form is pleasant, effective, per 
manent and easy to take. 
You can get the six weeks Youth-O-Form 
Treatment for 2l>/- (or a 10-day 
Carton, 5/6 1 from your nearest 
Chemist. 

If far from a Chemist, pin 
a Postal Note to a piece of 
paper with your name and 
"iress: send it to British 
Medical Laboratories, 
Box 4155. G.P.O. Syd- 
and your Youth-O- 
Form wili reach 
you by return mail 
plainly wrapped 
and with full 
directions for 
use. 



YOUTH-O-FORM 



Tonic 

REDUCING 
CAPSUtES 



V48 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



rV 



TOOTfL 

of\ 

4 IA 
WNSWMtttCO 

A LAKG& /"" 

L 



/MC/S0ZTO0TH. 



W/THKOLYNO&. 



YOUZMOUTH 

LOA/G-LAS7WG 



RECENT AMERICAN 

DfNTAL CONVENT/ON ADVOCATED 

A DENTAL CHAIR BUILT 

FORTWO-THE PATIENT 

AND THE DENTIST! SEE 

XOUR DENTIST TWICE 



KOLYNOS TWICE DAILY. 
KOLYNO5 BUBBLES 






KOLVNOS GOES TWICE AS FAR AS 
ORDINARY DENTAL CREAM BECAUSE 
IT IS CONCENTRATED. 
HALF-AN-INCHONA 

DRV BRUSH IS 
PLENTY/ 




KOtYNO5 CtE4NS BETTER, TASTED BETTER 




Stop your Headache 

Auaciii stops headaches faster. Firs* because it 
contains an extra ingredient.- Secondly because 
it is a prescription for pain and aches. ANACBV. 




Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Be Heady for the Snow 



Here we have one of the snap pullovers 
for the^ skiing season. We give the colour 
scheme as red and white, but there are 
ever so many combinations which may be 
used to advantage to harmonise with the 
rest of your outfit. 

Materials: 9 skeins of red crepe 3-ply 
wool, 8 skeins of white; 2 bone knitting 
needles No. 10 and 2 No. 11; 2 snap 
fasteners. 

Measurements: Length from shoulder, 
19 inches; width at under-arm, 32-33 
inches; sleeve, 18 inches. 

Abbreviations: k., knit; p., purl; sts., 
stitches; tog., together; W., white; E., red. 

Weave each colour wool across back by 
holding loosely the unused wool at back 
of each stitch when other wool is in action. 
The Front. 

Using No. 11 needles and red wool cast 
on 124 sts. and work in a ribbing of k. 1, 
p. 1 for 3 inches. 

Change to No. 10 needles and purl one 
row, increasing 3 sts. along the row (127 
sts.). Join white wool and work the pattern 
as follows, taking care not to pull the 
wool not in action to spoil its elasticity. 

Row 1 k. 4 E., 1 W., 4 E., I W., * 
15 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W. Eepeat from * to 
last 12 sts., 12 E. 

Row 2 p. 11 E., * 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 1 E., 

4 W., 13 E. Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 
1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W., 3 E. 

Row 3 k. 2 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W., 3 E., * 

I W., 11 E., 6 W., 3 E. Eepeat from * to 
last 11 sts., 1 W., 10 E. 

Row 4 p. 11 E., * 4 E., 3 W., 2 E., 1 W., 

II E. Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 9 E., 
1 W., 1 E. 

Row 5 k. 1 W., 10 E., * 10 E., 1 W., 3 E., 
3 W., 4 E. Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 
10 E., 1 W. 

Row 6 p. 1 E., 1 W., 9 E., * 4 E., 4 W., 
3 E., 1 W., 9 E. Eepeat from * to last 11 
sts., 11 E. 

Row 7 k. 11 E., * 8 E., 1 W., 3 E., 4 W., 

5 E. Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 8 E., 
1 W., 2 E. 

Row 8 p. 3 E., 1 W., 6 E., 1 W., * 10 
W., 3 E., 1 W., 6 E., 1 W. Eepeat from * 
to last 32 sts., 10 W., 3 E., 1 W., 18 E, 

Row 9 k. 17 E., 1 W., 3 E., 11 W., * 
1 W., 5 E., 1 W., 3 E., 11 W. Eepeat from 
to last 11 sts., 1 W., 5 E., 1 W., 4 E. 

Row 10 p. 5 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W., * 
10 W., 1 E., 1 W., 3 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W. 
Eepeat from * to last 32 sts., 10 W., 1 E., 
1 W., 3 E., 1 W., 16 E. 

Row 11 k. lS E., 1 W., 3 E., 1 W., 4 E., 
8 W., * 1 W., 3 E., I W., 3 E., 1 W., 4 E., 
8 W. Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 1 W., 
3 E., 1 W., 6 E. 

Row 12 p. 7 E., 1 W., 3 E., * 13 E., 1 W., 
3 E., 1 W., 3 E. Eepeat from * to last 11 
sts., 11 E. 

Row 13 k. 11 E., * 2 E., 1 W., 3 E., 
1 W., 6 E., 7 W., 1 E. Eepeat from * to 
last 11 sts., 2 E., 1 W., 8 E. 

ROW 14 p. 9 E., 1 W., 1 E., * 2 E., 7 W., 

6 E., 1 W., 3 E., 1 W., 1 E. Eepeat from 

11 E. 

E., * 1 W., 3 
Eepeat from * 



E., 2 W., 

to last 11 



to last 11 sts., 

Row 15 k. 11 
5 E., 7 W., 3 E. 
sts., 1 W., 10 E. 

Row 16 p. 10 E., 1 W., * 1 E., 1 W., 
2 E., 6 W., 1 E., 7 W., 2 E., 1 W. Eepeat 
from * to last 11 sts., 1 E., 1 W., 9 E. 

Row 17 k. 8 E., 1 W., 2 E., * 1 W., 
2 E., 13 W., 2 E., 1 W., 2 E. Eepeat from 
to last 11 sts., 1 W., 10 E. 

Row 18 p. 10 E., 1 W., * 3 E., 1 W., 



2 E., 5 W., 9 E., 1 W. Eepeat from * to 
last 11 sts., 3 E., 1 W., 7 E. 
. Row 19 k. 6 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 2 E., * 
11 E., 3 W., 2 E., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 2 E. 
Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 11 E. 

Row 20 p. 11 E., * 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
2 E., 1 W., 4 E., 4 W., 7 E. Eepeat from 

* to last 11 sts., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 2 E., 
1 W., 5 E. 

Row 21 k. 4 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W., 1 E., * 
7 E., 4 W., 3 E., 1 W., 4 E,, 1 W., 1 E. 
Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 11 E. 

Row 22 p. 11 E., * 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 
1 E., 4 W., 3 E., 4 W., 6 E. Eepeat from 

* to last 11 sts., 1 W., 1 E., 1 W., 4 E., 
1 W., 3 E. 

Row 23 k. 2 E., 1 W., 4 E., 1 W., 3 E, * 
1 W., 6 E., 3 W., 2 E., 6 W., 3 E. Eepeat 
from * to last 11 sts., 1 W., 10 E. 

Row 24 p. 11 E., * 4 E., 3 W., 2 E., 
1 W., 11 E. Eepeat from * to last 11 sts., 
9 E., 1 W., 1 E. 

Eepeat rows 5 to 24 until work measures 
12 inches from commencement for 19-inch 
length pullover, or 13 inches for 20-inch. 



Taking care to keep continuity of pat 
tern, cast off 8 sts. at beginning of next 2 
rows; then k. 2 tog. at both ends of the~ 
needle every alternate row until there are 
99 sts. 

Work without shaping until armhole is 
4i inches (measure on the straight). Shape 
neck by working over 38 sts., slip next 23 
sts. on a safety pin, leave remaining 38 
sts. On the first 38 sts. continue working, 
taking care to keep pattern correct; 
decrease 1 st. at neck edge every 2nd row 
until there are 34 sts. Work without shap 
ing until armhole is 6f inches; then cast 
off 6 sts. at armhole edge 5 times, then 
remaining 4 sts. Join wool at neck edge 
of remaining 38 sts. and work to match 
the shaping of side just completed, 
Back. 

Cast on 127 sts. and work exactly as 
given for front until there are 99 sts. 
Continue on these 99 stitches until arm- 
hole is 6| inches, then cast off 6 sts. at 
beginning of next 10 rows, then 4 sts. at 
beginning of next 2 rows. Slip remaining 
sts. on safety pin and leave for time being. 
Sleeves (both alike). 

Cast on 60 sts. on No. 11 needles with 
red wool and work in a ribbing of k. 1, 

[Turn to page 50."] 




Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



WHITE SUNDAY 



By LILIAN CHISHOLM. 



A white frock and a child s faith in a 

Hope believed she had found the answer 
to her problem. 

It had all happened so very simply, aa 
things do sometimes happen, when you 
least expect them. Of all places in the 
world, surely, you would least expect to 
solve a life-time problem at Granny s, and 
yet that was exactly the way 
it had happened. One moment 
Hope had been perplexed and 
confused, like she had been 
for a very, very long time 
past, and then quite suddenly 
things came nice and clear 
it was a little bit like the 
time she had gas at the den 
tist, and came float 
ing through a thick 
white mist into beau- 
tiful clear air again. 

It wasn t that 
Hope liked 
being a Prob- 
lem Child. The 
first time she 
had heard her 
mother describe 
her as a "prob 
lem" she had 
been rather flattered. 
But the conversation 
changed quickly, and 
it was then that Hope 
realised there might 
be something "not : 

quite nice" about being a 
problem. She had asked 
Daddy that night, on 
one of his rare visits to 
his little daughter s 
room. 

"Am I would you 
say I was a problem, 
Daddy?" she had asked 
anxiously, and she could 
remember him now, the 
way he had stood there 
on the white skin rug 
staring at her, and his 
cheeks rather pale. 

"You re a problem all 
right, my sweet," he had 
said slowly, not as if he 
was really talking to her 
at all. "Perhaps you re the 
biggest problem of all." 

She had come to dread 
the word. It got itself all 
tangled up with lots of 
funny things that happened 
soon afterwards. It was 
somehow mixed up with 
Daddy going away for 
much, much longer than 
usual, and with Mummy 
being too busy to remember 
she had a little girl to play with, and with 
people stopping talking when Hope came 
into the room. 

It was as if the whole world knew she 
was a problem, and had politely turned 
its back on her and was pretending not to 
see. Even Mrs. Charring, who came to 
"do" for Mummy some mornings, knew 
about it. 

"They re sending the poor little mite to 
her Granny s, and small wonder," Mrs. 



beloved tradition made a dream come true! 
Charring confided to the milkman. "She s 
a problem and no mistake." 

* * 

And so they had sent her to Granny s. 
Leastways, Mummy had sent her really, 
because Daddy it seemed had gone on a 
journey that was likely to last a very long 
time. 




never was a problem child who couldn t be 
cured by a slap when it s naughty and a 
hug when it s good. Problem, fiddlesticks! 
Don t pay any attention to such stuff, 
child. Supposing I tell you about Whit- 
sun, hm? You know what Whitsun really 
is, don t you! Whitsun means White Sun 
day." 

Hope s eyes brightened and she held her 
breath eagerly. White Sunday! That 
sounded beautiful. Nobody could hurt 
you on a White Sunday, nobody could be 
unhappy or cross or puzzled. 

"And when your mother was young," 
Granny went on, leaning back in her chair, 
"all little girls wore white on Whit Sun 
day. It was quite a disgrace for a nice 
little girl not to have a pretty white frock 




There at the gate stood 

Hope in a white starched 

frock. . . . 



Granny was old and a little bit twisted, 
and some days, when the weather found 
her out, she could scarcely walk at all. But 
she had a fund of stories, which seemed 
never ending. She knew everything 
except about problems, of course. Granny 
had never had a problem child. She had 
looked -quite cross when Hope asked her. 

"What sort of nonsense is that you re 
talking, child?" she had said, glaring at 
Hope through her keen dark eyes. "There 



% to go to church 
% in on Whit 
\ Sunday. I can 
remember my 
white frock 
even now. It 
was all stiff, 
and it had hun 
dreds of starched frills 
round the hem, and it made 
a lovely swishy noise as I 
walked to church. I can re 
member lots and lots of 
little girls walking down this 
very village street, all in 
white, singing because they 
were happy, and God had 
been very good to us all. The 
old women of the village 
used to say that if a little 
maid prayed a wish on Whit 
Sunday it was bound to come 
true there wasn t anything 
you couldn t put right at 
Whitsun. Some of the little 
girls, if they had been 
naughty, used to badger their 
mother into making a white 
frock, because they thought 
all their sins would be for 
given when they went to 
church. 

Hope hardly dared to 
breathe. It was more wonderful than 
Father Christmas, more, more special than 
Peter Pan, more true than fairies, and 
much oh, much more lovely than all the 
Bible stories put together. Little girl* 
could be as bad as anything all the year 
round, but if they wore white frocks and 
went to church on White Sunday, they, 
too, became white and good and lovely, 
and everybody forgave them and loved 
them again. It solved everything, even 
the problem! It was almost too simple to 
be true. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



11 



"You you proved it, Granny?" she asked. 

"Aye, I proved it, right enough, and so 
did your mother," Granny said serenely. 
"There s nothing like white for catching 
the eye, you know. But run along now, 
darling, and ask Milly to make us some 
nice buttered toast for a treat, hm? We ve 
talked enough." 

Hope skipped away to the kitchen, her 
face flushed, her hair tousled, and plump, 
rose-cheeked Milly surveyed her indul 
gently. 

"Well, it s a rosy little girl you re look 
ing, to be sure," she said equably. "Would 
you like to come home with me after tea? 
I ve made a scone round for my mother, 
and if your Granny can spare you, we ll 
be off, shall wef" 

* * * 

Hope loved going to the funny, shabby 
little cottage where Milly s family 
Jived. She liked to sit in a corner, >>| 
out of the way, and watch that jjfgg 
strange couple who were Milly s 
mother and father. She would wait 
till they started one of their argu 
ments, and sometimes she 
laughed till she had to stuff 
her hankie into her mouth 



"Dear Mummy," the letter read. "I must 
have a white frock quickly. It s very im 
portant, and I hope it will not be a problem 
for you. Please." 

Nothing to make such a fuss about, 
surely? Yet Milly seemed to peer so 
closely at the letter her eyes got all red 
and crumpled-looking and her lips were 
tightly folded. 

"White frock, indeed!" she muttered, as 
she stuck the stamp on with unnecessary 
violence. "Them and their problems 

pshaw!" 

* * * 

There couldn t possibly be a frock for 
two days, of course. Hope knew a letter 



"People like that don t deserve to have " 
"Milly!" Granny s mouth was all tight, 
and her eyes quite hard. "You forget your 
self! There is always an explanation, you 
know. Ah, look for yourself!" She hurried 
to J;he window. "He s coming back, and he 
has a parcel! Hope, my dear, there s a 

parcel, and it must be the frock." 

* * 

It was a pink frock. 
Sometimes you just can t believe things, 
and this was one thing Hope couldn t 
believe. She swallowed very, very hard, 
and she shut her eyes and opened them 
again, but it was still pink. 

"Darling, white is 80 
,,:.; dreadfully old-fashioned, so 
pyi I am sending an adorable 
:|f| little rose-pink frock which 
you will love. I wish 
I could see you, but I 




in case they thought her rude. At first 
he had been a little bit embarrassed, but 
Milly had soon put that right. 

"Mark my words, husband and wife that 
never get to squabbling don t love one 
another a row of brass buttons!" she had 
aid. 

Hope remembered the way her mother 
and father talked when she was with them. 
Always polite, never contradicting. But 
that, of course, was because she herself 
was a problem, and nobody could be happy 
with a problem in the house. 

She pulled at Milly s apron. 

"Will you write a letter for me before 
we go?" she demanded. "It s the most im 
portant letter in the world, and I have to 
send it quickly." 

Milly was no scholar, but even allowing 
for that she seemed to find the simple let 
ter extremely difficult. And when it was 
done she read it through and through, and 
looked at Hope queerly. 



The doctor came 
very late at night. 



took all night and always arrived at break 
fast-time. Then Mother had to go out and 
buy the frock, and pack it in tissue paper 
and send it back to Granny s, and that 
would take another day and night. 

Hope didn t seem particularly interested 
in meals any more, somehow. She liked 
to curl up at the window and watch for the 
postman, and when, on four consecutive 
days, he either didn t come at all, or only 
came with letters for Granny and Milly, 
she grew less and less interested in food. 
And when Whitsun was nearly upon them, 
Milly could stand it no longer. 

"She ought to be ashamed!" she said 
shortly, when the postman passed the door. 



am so busy. Be a good 
girl. . . ." 

"Darling, it s beau 
tiful!" Granny offered unhappily, 
touching the pink frills. "Mummy 
is quite right white is old-fashioned, 
you know." 

Milly looked furious. She crumpled up 
the tissue paper and she stamped to the 
door. 

"It s your own fault," she said hotly. 
"You stuffing her little head up with all 
that nonsense about Whitsun. She d never 
have thought of it without you putting 
the idea into her head." 

"Heaven forgive me for being a foolish 
old woman," Granny said in a whisper. "I 
forgot it all the moment I had told her. 
So that s why it had to be white? Hope, 
don t cry, my poppet." 

"I m not crying," the little girl told her 
in a polite voice, "and it s a lovely frock. 



12 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



But I" her voice cracked suddenly, "but 
I hate it!" 

Milly offered to take Hope home in the 
evening, the only treat her poor, honest 
heart oould think of for the child. Hope 
didn t want to go. Her Granny offered h^er 
the freedom of the old oak chest in the 
attic a hitherto incredible delight to Hope 
but now she only half-heartedly accepted. 

"I ll take you home to-morrow," Milly 
offered indulgently. "We always have high 
tea on Whit Sunday, and my parents will 
be proud to have you, dearie." 

"Is it White Sunday to-morrow ?" Hope 
asked slowly, and they nodded silently. 

She went up into the attic, and there she 
stayed until darkness crept down over the 
house and Milly came to fetch her for bed. 
To Milly s surprise the child seemed to 
have forgotten her grief, snuggling down 
quite happily into her bed and smiling at 
Milly. Milly frowned, perplexed. 

"You re a queer one," she teased. "Cry 
ing one moment and laughing the next, 
eh? My mother is making you a special 
jelly to-morrow as near white as no mat 
ter I" 

And when Milly had gone, Hope took 
her great discovery from beneath her bed 
and held it against her face. It smelt of 
lavender and camphor and dust, and some 
indefinable bitter-sweet smell that she had 
never smelt before. And it was a white 
frock. 

It was soft against her cheek, and she 
troked it and laughed a little, and prayed 
to God about it. 

"Thauk You very much," she kept on 
Baying over and over again. "Thank You 
for letting me be a little white girl. Now 
the problem will come right. You said so, 
didn t you? Granny said so, too, so it 
must be true. Granny knows she proved 
it. and so did Mummy, and so will I, won t 
If Thank You!" - 

She put the pink frock on for church in 
the morning. Her Granny heaved a sigh 
of relief when she saw the child s serene 
face above the rose-coloured frock. 

"I shan t be able to come with you, 
Hope," she said, "but you can meet Milly 
at the church gates. She is going home to 
fetch her parents. Don t fidget, there s a 
good girl, and say a prayer for your poor 
old granny, ehf" 

Milly went home, and Hope set off for 
church. It wasn t quite so warm as every 
body hopes for Whitsun to be, but in spite 
of that Milly wore her new straw hat, and 
she took her umbrella "just in case, like. 
And you must take your coat, pet. It often 
turns cold after a morning like this." 
* * 

The last bell was ringing by the time 
Milly and her parents reached the lane 
leading to the church. They put on an 
extra spurt, and half-way down the lane 
they stopped, of one accord, and stared at 
the queer little figure waiting for them at 
the church gate. 

The pink frock was gone, and so was the 
eoat. There stood Hope, erect and defiant, 
in a white, starched frock, with frills 
around the hem. 

"It s the old lady s," said Milly slowly, 
as they started on again. "The child must 
have found it in the attic. She ll be the 
laughing stock of the village, the poor 
darling but what ll we do?" 

"For myself," said Milly s father sav 
agely, "I ll slay the first one as laughs at 
the maid be it my best friend or no!" 

And so, with the final pealing of the 



bell, Milly s father led his family and 
Hope into a crowded church. Some eyes 
wrinkled into laughter, and others turned 
away, swiftly, that they might not be 
noticed. 

Hope saw none of them, heard none of 
the suppressed laughter, the sidelong 
glances passed her by. After to-day there 
would be no problem, and her mother and 
father would love her, and everybody 
would be as happy as as Milly s people! 
No greater Heaven than that could she 
hope for anyone 

* * * 

The wind blew up whilst they were in 
church. Milly, who had sat very close to 
Hope so that she might not feel the draught 
from the big stained glass window beside 
them, frowned anxiously. 

"Where did you leave your coat, dear?" 
she asked, under cover of the final hymn, 
and Hope, her eyes shining, her face radi 
ant, looked at Milly. 

"In the barn," she confessed happily. "It 
wasn t really wicked, was it? My pink 
froek is there, too. Has the problem gone 
now, do you suppose?" 

"More likely just starting," muttered 
Milly irately, as they came out of the 
church to find the first heavy raindrops 
just beginning. "You ll have to run, my 
dear and run fast. You ll catch your 
death, so you will. Run on now and get 
changed into your proper clothes before 
your Granny sees you." 

But Hope didn t run. She wanted to see 
all the nice villagers, who seemed to have 
become, quite suddenly, terribly kind. One 
old man stopped to put a hand on her head, 
as if to bless her. "The dear little maid," 
he said softly. "You don t know what 
good you ve done to-day, bless your heart. 
You re like a little bit of the past come to 
life a little memory in white." 

Soon after she arrived home Hope began 
to feel ill. First she was hot, then she 
was cold, and finally she didn t care much 
which she was because everything was 
behaving so strangely it didn t really mat 
ter. Granny looked at Milly and Milly 
looked at Granny. In the evening, when 
Hope was saying for the twentieth time 
she was thirsty, Milly burst into tears. 

"It s all along of the white frock," she 
blurted out to Granny. "I know you ll 
never forgive me, but what could we do? 
There she stood, poor little maid at the 
church gate, in your old white frock " 

The doctor came very late that night. 
He examined Hope and he heard Granny s 
story, and he sniffed, quite rudely for a 
very nice doctor. 

"The sooner you get those young fools 
down here, madam," he said to Granny, 
"the better for that poor child. I d like 
to give them a little piece of my mind, so 
I would! I heard it from my wife. The 
village can talk of nothing else." 

* * * 

And so poor old Granny had to start 
phoning, and there was a lot of wiring and 
cross-phoning, and arguing, and explana 
tion, and then, quite suddenly Hope came 
out of a thick blanket of mist, and saw 
her mother and father in the room, and 

It couldn t be true, of course. Miracles 
might happen if you prayed hard enough, 
but this was something she had forgotten 
to pray about because she was so busy 
praying about the Problem. But but 
her lips parted into a cracked little smile 
but it was true! Her mother and father 
were behaving like real, husband-and-w^fe 
people they were quarrelling! They 



weren t being a little bit polite, or even 
pretending to me! Even Milly s father 
never glowered quite so fiercely as Daddy 
was doing now. 

"If anything happens to the child," he 
was saying harshly. "I ll never forgive 
you. I knew this would happen as soon as 
my back was turned! You never did know 
the first thing about looking after her; J 
even had to teach you to put on a napkin! 
You can t deny it, you young idiot! What 
kind of a mother do you think you are? 
Sending that fool dress when the child 
specially asked for white so wrapped up 
in that stupid, silly career of yours, you 
couldn t take time off to wonder why it 
had to be white, could you? For two pins 
I d spank you and I m not joking " 

And mother s cheeks were a glorious 
red, and her eyes were full of little sparks. 

"If I hadn t been so worried about you, 
imagining all kinds of things happening 
to you in that idiotic flat of yours," she 
said swiftly, "this would never have hap 
pened, because I d never have sent her 
away in the first place! But what kind of 
a home was it for her with you gone, and 
me weeping all over the place, and " 

Then it all worked according to plan, 
like a neat jig-saw puzzle, just like Milly s 
people. Quite suddenly they weren t apart 
any longer, but close together, and 
Mummy s head was on Daddy s shoulder, 
and she was crying, and he was smiling, 
and they spoke so very, very softly 

"You wept because I was gone, you little 
scatterbrain?" he asked gently. "Then, all 
those things you said when we agreed to 
separate, they didn t mean a thing? I was 
so darned worried about what would hap 
pen to the child, darling it was all such a 
problem but I love you so much, you 
little idiot you must have known it " 

"But if anything happens to her, it will 

be my fault " said Mummy, crying. 

"Oh, John, I ve been such a fool! If she 
doesn t get better, I shall die. Life is 
such a problem " 

"Problem, fiddlesticks!" snapped Granny H 
voice from the doorway. "Don t you two 
ever talk of anything but problems^ The 
only problem at this minute is how to 
make you two foolish children realise that 
all the child wants is for you to turn round 
and talk to her instead of weeping on each 
other s shoulders! There never was any 
thing wrong with that child except that 
you were so busy deciding who was to have 
her, and who loved her the most, that you 
forgot to love her as little g-irls want to 
be loved. Get along with you, do!" 

They came and stood beside Hope, and 
she lay there looking at them. 

"It worked, didn t it?" she croaked 
thinly. "I prayed that the Problem would 
go, and it went, didn t it? You shouted 
and that means you love one another 
Millie said so. It was rather a funnv 
frock, Mummy but it worked, didn t it? 
Granny said all little girls wore white 
and they always got what they wanted. 
She said it worked for you, Mummy. How 
did it?" 

Her mother giggled yes, actually 
giggled! 

"I wore white on the Whitsunday I first 
met your Daddy," she said, blushing ador 
ably. "Granny always made us wear white. 
I m sorry I was so silly about the pink, 
dear " 

Hope clapped her hands delightedly. 

"And you prayed for Daddy and got 
him!" she said happily. "And if you hadn t 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



13 



worn a white frock you might never have 
found him!" 

Mummy choked a little. 

"And if my little girl hadn t worn a 
white frock yesterday, I might have lost 
him again," she said shakily. "Darling 
when you have a little girl of your own, 
never forget what I forgot, will you? 
Never raind what she asks for make sure 
she really wants it, and then get it, no 
matter what you have to do to get it. It 
may sound awfully silly to you then, but 
try to understand, will you?" 

Hope snuggled down contentedly, one 
hand held by her father, the other by her 
mother. Then she frowned. 

"But, Mummy supposing I have a little 
boy," she demanded, "what do I do then?" 

Daddy looked at Mummy and there it 
was, that beautiful look which she had 
seen in the eyes of Milly s mother and 
father warm, and cosy, and sure. 

"Tell your little boy to fall in love with 
a little girl in white," he teased softly; 
"tell him that little girls all nice little 
girls, wear white!" 



A String of Pearls. 

What a delight to a woman is a long 
string of pearls: a treasure in itself, as it 
can be used so many ways. Perhaps you 
have already used it to ornament a 
frock, and now sketched are a few of the 
latest ways: 



Enamelled furniture needs special treat 
ment. There are lots of excellent products 
on the market for cleaning enamelled fur 
niture. But just for a minor "pick-me- 
up," give it a wash with a flannel dipped 
in a solution of one tablespoonful of bi 
carbonate of soda to a quart of water. 
You ll find your furniture quite "cheered" 
by this simple treatment. 

A pessimist is one who makes difficulties 
of his opportunities; an optimist is one 
who makes opportunities of his difficulties. 




A: The pearls round throat, knotted at 
one side. B: Bound the neck and undsr 
the revere. C: Wound round wrist. D: As 
a waist belt. E: As a high neck collar. 
F: Another idea for under the collar. 

Many of you still have a long string of 
pearls or beads; beads of any sort would 
look most attractive. 



Juvenile Crime. 

A leading British newspaper threw opem 
its columns to the discussion of juvenile 
crime, which is just as rampant and alarm 
ing there as it is in Australia. Magistrate*, 
members of the Clergy, youth leaders. 
school teachers and scores of others inti 
mately connected with "Young Britain" 
wrote long and thoughtful letters. 

The big answer contained in almost 
every letter was a return to Christianity. 

There are practical suggestions for more 
scripture films, for making Church activi- 
tiete more attractive. There is also a call 
for a new outlook. Wrote one reader: 
"The answer to crime is not more police 
men, but a change of heart a definite 
practising and positive Christian faith." 

Eeaders demand a revival of religion* 
training for boys and girls. They want the 
children back in the Sunday Schools aud 
away from the Sunday am-usements. 

And this the revival of religious train 
ing in its widest aspect is feu by prac 
tically all readers to be the most important 
answer of all. 



A little eucalyptus oil applied to collar* 
of coats and mackintoshes will remove all 
grease marks. It is also good for cleaning 
panama hats. 



Ah ! that s the way 

scones and pastry 

should taste 



ALWAYS USE 




BAKING POWDER 

Ask for all the Aunt Mary s. Pure Food Products 




7T 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 







You feel lovely 
(and look it!) 



in 



LIBERTY 



There are good reasons for this, 
rirst is the unquestioned superiority 
of Liberty design, then exquisite 
workmanship. Expert fitting that 
cannot go wrong because of the unique 
Liberty five figure type chart is 
another reason why you will be glad 
you chose Liberty Corsets and 
Brassieres to give you loveliness. For 
Liberty means loveliness, youthfu 
contours and the grace of 
radiant well being. 



There is a Lib 
erty garment to 
fit every figure 
type at a price 
that appeols. 



Liberty Corsets 

and Brassieres 

are available at 

all leading 

stores. 





Corsets 8 Brassiere 




Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1 949 



15 



Child s Bolero w#/t Rose Urimminq in Jair Jsle 



o-o-Q-o-o 

Materials: 2 ozs. 3-ply wool in blue, i 
oz. each of red and green and yellow; 1 
pair of No. 10 and 1 pair of No. 12 needles; 

1 medium size crochet hook. 
Measurements: Length from shoulder to 

lower edge, 7 ins.; sleeve seam, 2J ins. 

Tension: 8 sts. and 10 rows to 1 in. 

Abbreviations: B., Blue; G., green; Y., 
yellow; B., red; k., knit; p., purl; tog., 
together; st., stitch; st.-st., stocking-stitch; 
rep., repeat; beg., beginning; dec., de 
crease. 

Note: After casting off any number of 
sts., the sts. quoted immediately following 
do not include the loop remaining on the 
right-hand needle. 

To Make the Back. 

Using the No. 10 needles and B. wool, 
cast on 80 sts. 

Garter st. 4 rows. 

Change to st.-st. and work 30 rows. 

Armhole Shaping: Cast off 3 sts. at the 
beg. of the next 2 rows. 

Next row K. 2 tog., k. to last 2 ets., 
k. 2 tog. 

Next row P. 2 tog., p. to last 2 Bts., 
p. 2 tog. 

Rep. the last 2 rows once more. 

Next row K. 2 tog., k to .last 2 sts., 
k. 2 tog. 

Next row P. to end. 

Repeat the last 2 rows once and the 1st 
row once. There are now 60 sts. on the 
needles. 

Work 23 rows more in st.-st. 

Cast off 8 sts. at the beg. of each of the 
next 2 rows. 

Cast off the remainder loosely. 
Left Front. 

Cast on 40 sts. on No. 10 needles in B. 
wool and work 4 rows in garter st. 

Next row K. to the end. 

Next row K. 4, p. to the end. 

3rd row K. 23 B., 2 G., 15 B. 

4th row K. 4 B., p. (11 B., 2 G., 1 B., 

2 G., 20 B.). 

5th row K. (20 B., 2 G., 1 B., 2 G., 
15 B.). 

6th row K. 4 B., p. (9 B., 2 G., 1 B., 

1 G., 2 B., 1 G., 3 B., 1 G., 16 B.). 

7th row K. (16 B., 1 G., 4 B., 2 G., 1 B., 

3 G., 13 B.). 

8th row K. 4 B., p. (12 B., 3 G., 3 B., 

2 G., 16 B.). 

9th row K. (17 B., 5 G., 18 B.). 

10th row K. 4 B., p. (8 B., 2 R., 9 B., 
1 G., 16 B.). 

llth row K. (14 B., 2 G., 1 B., 1 G., 7 
B., 3 R., 1 B., 2 R., 9 B.). 

12th row K. 4 B., p. (5 B., 2 R., 1 B., 

3 R., 1 B., 2 R., 3 B., 1 G., 2 B., 1 G., 1 B., 

1 G., 13 B.). 

13th row K. (12 B., 1 G., 1 B., 2 G., 
3 B., 1 G., 2 B., 2 R., 1 B., 2 R., 1 B., 3 R., 
9 B.). 

14th row K. 4 B., p. (6 B., 3 R., 2 B., 

3 R., 1 B., 1 G., 4 B., 3 G., 1 B., 1 G., 
11 B.). 

15th row K. (11 B., 1 G., 1 B., 3 G., 
9 B., 2 Y., 2 B., 1 R., 10 B.). 

16th row K. 4 B., p. (4 B., 4 R., 1 B., 

2 Y., 1 B., 4 R., 4 B., 3 G., 1 B., 1 G., 
11 B.). 

17th row K. (11 B., 4 G., 4 B., 4 R., 

1 B., 1 R., 3 B., 4 R., 8 B.). 

18th row K. 4 B., p. (5 B., 2 R., 2 B., 

2 R., 1 B., 1 R., 9 B., 3 G., 11 B.). 

19th row K. (11 B., 1 G., 9 B., 3 R., 
1 B., 3 R., 12 B.). 

20th row K. 4 B., p. (8 B., 3 R., 1 B., 

4 R., 20 B.). 



21st row K. (20 B., 2 R., 4 B., 2 R., 
12 B.). 

This completes the Rose. Continue in 
st.-st. in all B. Work 9 more rows (30 
rows in st.-st. in all). 

Shape for the Armhole: Cast off 3 sts. 
at the beg. of the next row, k. to end. 

Next row P. 

Dec. 1 st. at the armhole edge on the next 
and each of the following rows for 5 decs., 
then dec. twice more on alternate rows. 
There are now 30 sts. on the needle. 

Work 16 rows more in st.-st., ending 
at the neck edge. 

Next row Cast off 4 sts. P. to the end. 

Next row K. to last 2 sts., k. 2 tog. 

Next row P. 2 tog., p. to end. 

Rep. the last 2 rows 3 times (18 sta.). 

Next row Cast off 8 sts., k. to the end. 

Next row P. Cast off the remaining 10 
sts. 



Eight Front. 

Work as for the Left Front, reversing 
all shapings and the pat. for the Rose, Le., 

1st row of st.-st. K. to the end. 

2nd row P. to last 4 sts., k. 4. 

3rd row K. (15 B., 2 G., 23 B.), etc. 

Work 1 row more in st.-st. before shap 
ing at the armhole. 

Sleeves. 

Cast on 60 sts. on No. 10 needles in B. 
wool. 

Work 4 rows in garter st., then 10 rows 
in st.st., commencing with a k. row. 

Change to No. 12 needles a-ad reverse 
the work, i.e.: Next row P. to the end. 
Next row K. to the end. 

Rep. the last 2 rows 4 times, p. 1 row. 

Change to No. 10 needles and keep to 
st.-st. for the next 4 rows. Inc. 1 st. at 
the beg. and end of the next row, work 3 
rows more (62 sts.). Dec. 1 st. at the beg. 

[Turn to page 36.] 




16 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




TRUE 

TO THE HIGHEST PITCH OF QUALITY, IN LOVELY COLOUR TONES. 




DEPENDABLE KNITTING WOOLS 

ati Zfoteit 



PRODUCT OF LINCOLN MILLS (AUSTRALIA) LIMITED 



139 



DAPHNE * TRIPLE TWIST v THISTLEDOWN * GOLDEN WATTLE 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



17 




About Skirts. 

From Paris we are advised that 
skirts arc of many kinds, most of 
them slightly fuller and sometimes 
tiered in spiral fashion for after 
noon wear, while hips are often 
emphasised by slanting basques, by 
flaring draperies caught on the left 
side or by pocket effects. 

Back interest is in favour and 
some skirts pleated in front flare 
away at the back, although others 
flare out in equal fulness around 
the knees. 

Front interest is introduced by 
Sehiaparelli and Maggy Rouff in 
skirts which have important pouched 
drapery across the stomach. 



Paris Fashipns. 

Paris waiter fashions feature 
greatly modified lines, states a 
special message received by the Aus 
tralian Wool Board. 

Waist lines will remain tightly 
nipped, but skirts will not be ex 
travagant in length nor will they 
be full enough to consume unneces 
sary quantities of precious wool 
materials. 

Pleats will bi> in high 
favour, with accordeon 
pleats to give a slim, almost 
tubular line well to the 
fore, while many skirts will 
flare out in fully pleated 
effects. 






% 






i 

Suit, 7123 1 S . 6d. 
3 yds. 54 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 





Suit, 7113 1 S . 6d. 

2J yds. 54 ms. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ms. 



1 if 
Frock, 7319 1 S . 6d. 
4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Coat, 7309 1 S . 6d. 

3 1 yds. 54 ms. wide! 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \d. extra.] 



18 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1 949 



Accessories. 

To-day s fashion accent is on accessories. Those 
I found included : 

... a clock bag in black antelope with the hands 
and. hours marked in diamante. 

... a "date" belt in pink suede with the owner s 
name and telephone numbe r printed on it. 

. . . ten real miniature lipsticks in different shades 
of red on the front of a black belt. 

. . . an hourglass belt with lead soldiers on it and 
with drum buttons to match. 

... a brown, fringed belt with lead Red Indians 
as ornaments, and a romantic black belt with gilt 
lovers knots. 

. . huge hat-pins in gilt-\vork with coloured 
paste stones, pearls, or multi-coloured beads in th 
centre, perfect to spear through the new Tudor 
berets. 

... a Victorian flower-holder in gilt to be us< 
as a lapel clip. / ^W^, 

. . . the latest velvet chokers with HHl 
pearl studs or large pearl clusters in 
the centre. 





7334 1s. 10d 

2| yds. 

->4 ms. wide. 

Sizes 32, 34, 

36 ins. 



: *fo,. ** ; *)^ ^S?** "* 

W t-^^i Suit 71 43 1s.~6d. si 

I 2f yds. 54 ms. wide." 

r X t; Sizes 32 to 40 ms. 

T $?!* 




Matron s Frock 
7300 1 S . 10d. 

3 yds. 

54 ins. wide. 
Sizes 34 to 48 ins.! 



Two Piecer, 
7308 1 S . 6d 

3i yds. 

54 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated.- Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-40 .) Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 





Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1 949 



19 




Frock, 
7322 1s. 6d. 

2 1 yds. 

54 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 

to 40 ins. 



Frock, 7325 1s. 6d 

2f yds. 54 ins. wide 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Coat, 7115 1 S . 6c 
2|yds. 54 ins. widi 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins 




Jackets. 

Jackets generally are shorter 
and many houses feature brief 
semi-fitted boleros ^of all kinds. 
Still in high favour is the thigh- 
length jacket, usually in a bright 
colour, lined with a contrasting 
shade, or sometimes with fur, 
states a fashion message received 
by the Australian Wool Hoard. 

Scarf collars are widely used 
on these coats, as well as on many 
loose, full-length coats in which 
sloping shoulder lines are em 
phasised by cowl-like collars 
which serve as hoods and by shawl 
or scarf collars. Generally, loose 
coats are made on cloche lines 
and redingotes are rarely seen. 
Designers favour all the softer 
wool fabrics, Avith bright but not 
velvety surfaces for coals, and 
pastel-coloured blanket cloths are 



well to the fore, while there arc a 
few speckly tweeds in subdued 
shades. 

Coats. 

Of two types of eo^it featured,, 
one will be the fitting redingote 
type of classic cut, while the 
other will be a loose, straightly 
falling model, often with con 
cealed buttoning down the front. 
or with such ample fulness 
that no fastenings are re 
quired. 

In some, smooth semi- 
velours will be worked in 
broad bands to imitate the 
working of a fur coat, each 
one separated by a narrow 
piping of satin or faille. 
Incidentally, coats will be of 
moderate length, just cover 
ing the calf. 




Maternity Frock/ 

7331 1s. 10d. 

3f yds. 54 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



-}nook. 




[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, ld. extra.] 



20 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




"Darling... 
where s the 
Johnson s?" 

Refreshing to every man 
as his daily shower is a 
brisk follow-up with 
Johnson s Baby Powder. 
No more chafes and 
irritations, just a feeling 
of smooth comfort that 
lasts all day. Johnson s, 
too, is a great compliment 
to any shave! 



jf By no means for 
men only! Naturally, 
women, too, know and 
appreciate the. quality - 
of Johnson s Baby 
Powder, the perfect 
daily talcum. | 





"BEST FOR BABY, BEST FOR YOU 



PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 




DRINK HABIT 
DESTROYED 

Do you suffer through the curse of 
excessive drinking? EUCRASY has. 
changed homes from misery and 
want to happiness again. Established 
52 years it^ destroys all desire for 
Alcohol. Harmless, tasteless, can be 
given secretly or taken voluntarily. 
State -which required. 

SEND 20/- FULL TWENTY 

DAYS COURSE. 
DEPT. B, EUCRASY CO. 

J97 Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



as** 

For the relief of 
Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, Lum 
bago, Neuritis, 
always use 

WAWN S 

WONDfiRWOOL 




EVERY WOMAN SHOULD 
READ THIS TABLE 



HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


5 


Il2lbs. 


5 1" 
5 2" 


MSlbs. 
I20lbs. 


5 3" 


I24lbs. 


5 4" 


125 Ibs. 


*TAese ore AVERAGE 
weights for a healthy 
woman. 




I can quickly 
solve your weight 
problem . . . 

No matter what 
your age, whether 
you are over-weight or under 
weight, I can, and will, help 
you. First thing to do is fill 
in diagram below and I will 
send you my interesting pub 
lication on beauty, together 
with your personal measure 
ments. Enclose 4^d.- for 
postage. 

FREE! Complete Chart 
showing your ideal 
measurements . . . 

Fill this in to-night. 



AGE 




HEIGHT 




WEIGHT 




OFFICE 
USE ON! Y 


Dept. F 



T. A. LANGRIDGE 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 



278 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 



2/4i2 





Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



21 



Coat, 9876 1 S . 3d 

, 10,12, 14 years. 

2 a yds. 54 ins. wide. 




* Pinafore FroTk, 

9059 1 S . 3d. 
12 and 14 years. 
Blouse : Br 

, yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Frock : 
\ yds. 54 ins. wide. 



Coat, 9060 1 S . 3d. 

12 and 14 years. 
2 yds. 54 ins. wide. 














Wool Robes. 

Wool robes this year reach 
a new high for decorative 
eye appeal. 

You ll find them in angelic 
blues, pinks, and snowy 
whites. The materials are 
as thin as chiffon and the 
warmth equal to heavy duty 
jerseys or even heavier 
woollens. 

They are made with soft 
folds where the extra fulness 
in skirt and bodice make 
them appear as a gracious 
house robe. 

They are very flattering, 
trimmed with lace dyed the same 
lovely colour as the wool of the 
robe. These wool affairs come in 
extremely simple nun-like robes, 
complete to cowl head-dress and 
a loose cord to be tied around the 
waistline. 



Coat, 9978 1 S . 3d 

4,6,8,10,12, 14 years. 

f yds. 54 ins. wide. 



Suit, 9957 1 S . 6d. 

16 to 18 years. 

32 inches bust. 

2? yds. 54 ins. wide 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated.* Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \%d. extra.} 



22 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 





v&WSwSSi^^S 



Atep forward wltk 



Hninmc BOOK no. 258 

JjujJ Styling that gives smooth 

WOOLS sophistication to good .Jhand-knitting 

Price of Book 7d.. posted 6%d. If unobtainable locally write to 

PATONS & BALDWINS LTD. 

PEPT.S BOX 1606 M. MELBOURNE or BOX )7II SS. SYDNIT 



Makes it 
really white 




Reckitt s 
Blue 



Out of the blue comes the whitest wash" 



Oil-stains can be taken out of carpets 
by covering the affected parts with fuller s 
earth and water. Leave to dry, then brush 
out. 



Never iron embroidery on the right side. 
Lay the article face down on several thick 
nesses of Turkish towelling, and iron the 
back. 



_( A X \ v 



Add that 

SAVOY 

Flavour 

to your 
fem/fy menu 



Here is spaghetti (or 
macaroni) at its delicious, 
nutritious best! SAVOY . . . 
made in the true Continental 
style, and unanimous choice 
of Continental chefs here in 
Australia. Try SAVOY, and 
always ask for it by name. 




NUTRSFOODS/^/ 

MACARONI 
SPAGHETTI 




SAVOY NUTRIFOODS PTY. LTD., 
20 George St., Leichhardt, N.S.W., LM5602 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



23 



Men s Shirt, 7013 1 S . 3d. 
3 yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Neck sizes, 14, 15f, 

16J ins. f^f 

Also in Boys sizes, 
4 to 14 years. 




Princess Margaret s Dress Secrets. 

Skirts that are at least thirteen inches from the 
ground. A minimum of jewellery in the daytime; 
no fancy trinkets. Clothes should be comfortable 
rather than complicated. Xo startling colours; no 
black, but a decided fancy for greens and pastel 
shades. Heart-shaped necklines, but high-necked 
dinner dresses with long sleeves. Every dress 
brushed and pressed after one wearing. 



Colour takes the driver s seat in 
suits, coats and casual or tailored 
dresses, with brandy brown 
featured as a fall bracer. Grey 
loves itself dearly and will have 
traffic with no other colour but 
grey. The result is a series of 
dresses and suits and dresses in 
two- or three-tone grey. This is 
done in vertical or cross bands, 
on skirt or from shoulder to 
hemline. 




Men s Pyjamas, 
9744 1s. 6d. 

5 A yds. 

36 ins. wide. 

Chest sizes, 36, 38, 

40, 44 ins. 

Also boys sizes, 

4 to 14 years. 



Men s Lumber Jacket 

9982 Is. 3d. 
1f yds. 54 ins. wide. 
Chest sizes, 36, 38, 

40, 44 inches. 
..Also boys sizes, 6, 8, 
V 10, 12, 14 years. 



Pyjamas, 
9452W| S . 3d. 

4,6,8,10,12, 

14 years. 

3f yds. 

36 ins. wide. 




Pyjamas, 

9169 1 S . 3d 

2 and 4 

years. 

2 yds. 

36 ins. 

wide. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, Urf. extra.} 



24 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Frock, 

9065 1s 3d. 
2 and 4 years. 

1f Yds. : 

36 ins. wide. 



Play Suit, 

9740 1s. 3d. 

2 and 4 

years. 

Shirt, 1 yd. 

36 ins. wide 
Suit, 1 yd. 
36 ins. wide 




Frock, 9064 1 S . 3d. 
2 and 4 years, 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Contrast : 
yd. 36 ins. wide. 



Overalls, 

9566 1s. 3d. 

1,2,4-6, 

8-10 years. 

2> yds. 
36 ins. widej 



New Colours. 

There is less black this season and newest 
colours include a whole range of blue, from royal 
and violet shades to those of duck-wing feathers. 
Greens range from soft brownish greens to emer 
alds and subtle olive or sage tonings, while beige 
shades, running from true beige to the darker 
camel hair shades, promise to replace the greys 
of early autumn. Mauves, including 
amethyst, orchid, cyclamen and even 
prune are often used, and Jacques Fath 
combines heliotrope with light green 
for evening. True pinks, including old 
rose and the dark pot-pourri pinks are 
also seen, whilst palest pink, together 
with soft yellows and greens, promises to be 
among the spring favourites. 

Quality Items. 

At a leading store the skating skirt has 
been welcomed back by customers and is 
shown in solid flannel with bright hem out 
lined in braid. Customers are willing to 
accept long-withheld merchandise of this 

type in whatever fabric is offered, as long as quality 

of fabric is present. 
GJassic sweaters are 

a "must" at this 

shop, with only one 

novelty sweater 

stocked a simple 

pull-over with a 

small, embroidered 

motif on the front. 




Suit, 9054 1s. 3d. 

4, 6, 8 years. 

Jacket, 1 yds. 54 ins. wide 
Skirt, | yd. 54 ins. wide. 
Bodice, yd. 36 ins. wide 
Skirt cut on bias. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. >> Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
__AustmhanJiom^Journair 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.Z.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal, May L> 



UGLY 




ENDED 

IN 3 MINUTES 




1. Apply Vcet Cream straight 
from the tube. 

2. After 3 minutes wash off. 
Not a trace of hair remains. 

3. Skin is soft and smooth as 
if no ugly hair ever existed. 

This is what Veet Cream will do 
for you. It removes every trace 
of hair in three minutes. Skin 
is left velvety, smooth and white. 
No stubble or shadow shows. 
This dainty white cream gently 
dissolves away the hair below the 
skin surface. Tt actually weakens, 
and thus checks new growth. Get 
a tube of Veet Cream to-day. 
Successful results guaranteed or 
money refunded. 

Veet Cream is available at all 
chemists 2/9 a tube. 



VEET 




V.7A.IO 



Distributors: 

X Commonwealth & Dominion 
Agencies Pty. Ltd. 

Box 2949. G.P.O.. Sydney 




MORE and MORE MOTHERS 

choose 

LAXETTES 



for iheir children and themselves 




18 IN TINS 1/9 



The 

LAXATIVE 

KNOWN and TRUSTED 
FOR 40 YEARS 



GENTLE, EFFECTIVE, 
SAFE, RELIABLE 

LAXETTES contain phenolphthalein, which is 
non- habit forming and is one of the safest 
and most reliable laxative substances known 
to medical science. This is incorporated in the 
finest block chocolate by an exclusive, 
scientific process, which ensures accurate 
dosage and strict conformity to British 
Pharmacopoeia standards. 



SAMPLE (BLOCK 

COUPON -" - < LETTERS 

M I PLEASE 



stamp to covor 

postage and 

packing . . . to Laxett* Mfg. Co., 3 Swnston~S~trt/Meibo\Trn 



AHJ!.4 



26 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




"Red Shoes" Embassy. 

The Play and Film 

&+<, &+-0- 

"Easter Parade," at St. James, , 
starring Fred Astaire and Judy Gar 
land, is a first class musical comedy, 
with plenty of snap, songs, and dances. 
This was the film in which Gene Kelly 
was cast for the dancing role when he 
broke his ankle, and Fred Astaire came 
back from his retirement to take the 
place. Bad luck for Gene, and Fred 
was not anxious to take on the part. 
However, he has made a tremendous 
success of it and is ably assisted by 
the irrepressible Judy. Apart from the 
suberb dancing, and it is a treat to 
watch Astaire, because of the ex 
quisite artistic finish of his work, the 
songs and ensemble are delightful. 
New tunes are: "It Only Happens 
When I Dance With You," "Mr. Mon 
otony," "Better Luck Next Time," 
"Steppin Out With My Baby," "A 
Couple of Swells," "Drum Crazy," "A 
Fella With an Umbrella" and "Happy 
Easter." Judy solos for three num 
bers, Astaire dances alone to two of 
them, Astaire and Judy pair for an 
other. The other two numbers team 



Astaire and Ann Miller, 
and Judy and Lawford. 

* * * 

Annie has been getting 
her gun at the Theatre 
Eoyal for many months 
past, and finds when she 
demonstrates she is an ex 
pert shot, she loses her man. 
In between times Annie 
moves about, mixes with 
Ked Indians and takes a 
sea voyage; also, there are 
a lot of songs and dances, 
and everybody about the 
place seems happy except 
Annie. Then she finds if 
she misses out with the gun 
she may get her man. Annie 
has discovered the old-time 
philosophy that if you 
praise and flatter a man 
he is yours for the taking! 





Good Sam" Regent. 



Ivor Moreton and Dave Kaye, Tivoli. 

"The Snake 
Pit," at the May- 
fair, deals with 
a married woman 
who has become 
mental. She is 
unable to grasp 
the fact that she 
is in an institu 
tion and shows 
no sign of even 
recognising her 
husband. Hubby 
does not know 
much about her 
past. They met 
in a big city; 
saw a great deal 
of each other; 
then one day she 
suddenly fled 
from him. The 
film goes through 
the different 
phases of the 
patient s life till 
sanity at last re 
turns. Not a 
pleasant subject 
by any means, 
but one that is 




Maurice Callerno t Tivoli. 

very prominently in the public eye at the 
present time when there is such severe 
criticism of the lack of facilities for treat 
ing mental patients. In the cast: Olivia 
De Havilland, Mark Stevens, Leo Genn, 
Celeste Holm, Glenn Langan, Helen Craig, 
Leif Erickson, Beulah Bondi, Lee Patrick. 

* *. 

The much-talked-of Australian picture, 
"Eureka Stockade," which was not so well 
received in England, is now showing at the 
Lyceum. Headliners are Chips Rafferty, 
Jane Barrett, and associated with them 
are Gordon Jackson, Jack Lambert, Peter 
Illing and Ealph Truman. It,, as every 
Australian knows, is the story of the gold 
fever of the fifties, culminating in the 
riot of the Eureka Stockade when the 
miners were harassed and worried by 
officialdom, and they decided on drastic 
steps in asserting their rights. It is un 
doubtedly a fine picture, but could have 
been produced on a more lavish scale. All 
the same, as featuring a forward step in 
Australian history, it should be seen by aH 
freedom-loving folks. Possibly the big 
reason for its cold reception elsewhere may 
be due to its purely local colour. The same 
is equally true of many American and 
British pictures. 

* it- 

Oversights in "Oliver Twist": When 
Oliver was walking up to ask for more you 
could hear his feet clattering on the floor 
although he was barefooted. When the 
soldiers were going to arrest Bill Sikes 
they shouted, "Open this door in the name 
of the King" and story takes place in 
Queen Victoria s reign. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



27 



"The Red Shoes" (Embassy) has a great 
story the simple, poignant story of Hans 
Andersen, grown up in terms of modern 
people and emotions. It has a great cast 
not only of established fihn-stars, but of 
many actors, musicians, dancers and artists 
who are famous in their own countries and 
their special spheres of art. Its setting is 
the International Ballet touring the capi 
tals of Europe. Fine musical the sound 
track filled with a variety of music, from 
symphony orchestra through simple ballet 
melody to the best of swing. It is, in 
addition, a film experiment, because it 
brings to the screen the first full ballet 
written, composed and designed for the 
cinema. Beyond all this you will like 
"The Re* Shoes" because it is artistic, 
and brealts entirely new ground. 
* * * 

The delightful comedy-drama, "Good 
Sam," at the Regent, is sure to get a big 
share of laughter and 
applause just because it is 
different. Gary Cooper, as 
Sam Clayton, is an incur 
ably Good Samaritan affec 
tionately known as "Good 
Sam"; but his goodness 
gets him into all kind of 
trouble. He lends some folks 
his car and is stuck with 
a garage bill and a damage 
suit. Sam rescues one of 
the shop girls from suicide 
and instals her in his own 
home. All pure and above 
board, but wifie does not 
like it, and there is more 
trouble. Sam s crowning 
misfortune occurs when he 
is on his way to the bank 
to deposit the employee s 
benefit fund. A slick lady 
faints in his arms and per 
suades him to see her home. 
He emerges from this with 
a bump on the head and 
minus the money. Un 
successful in his efforts to 



Collins, Edmund Lowe, Joan 
Lorring. 

# * 

When Tod Hilton, who is 
appearing in Tivoli "Starry 
Night" Revue, left Aus 
tralia in 1941 he sailed on a 
troopship as a sergeant- 
pilot in the R.A.A.F., but 
by the time he was de 
mobbed in 1946 he had be 
come a Wing-Commander. 
Soon after he made his first 
BBC broadcast, since when 
he s been heard regularly 
on the BBC s network. He 
acted as feature singer in 
a revue performed for the 
summer season in the Isle 
of Man, and it was when 
appearing in this revue he 
was seen by David N. 






"Whispering Smith," Prince Edward. 
raise money from his many debtors or from 
his banker, Sam reaches the depths of 
despair and enters a bar where he meets a 
tramp with whom he exchanges clothes. 
Some time afterwards, he gets caught up 
in a Salvation Army parade and finds him 
self inside the rescue mission he helped 
found. Here the misunderstood Sam is re- 
hnited to his distracted wife. Cast includes: 
Gary Cooper, Ann Sheridan, Bobby Dolan, 
Laura Lee Michaels, Louise Beavers, Ray 



"Easter Parade" St. James*. 

Martin, Tivoli s Managing 
Director, and was booked 
up immediately for Aus- 
ralia ahd "Starry Nights." 

* * * 

"Winter Meeting," at the 
Century, features Bette 
Davis as a New England 
(U.S.A.) poetess who, at a 
party given by John Iloyt, 
meets a young, returned 
Naval hero, James Davis, 
accompanied by Hoyt s 
secretary (Janis Paige). 
Strangely attracted, the 
two pour out their hearts 
to each other at the poetess 
country place one weekend. 
She lias for years blamed 
her mother for her father s 
death, and he, while want 
ing to enter the priesthood, 
has been troubled by the 
fact that he had inadvert 
ently sent his submarine crew to its death 
though he himself had been captured and 
had lived through the war. They fall deeply 
in love, but they part, however, after an 
argument and when later they meet in 
Hoyt s home again, he asks her to marry 
him. She declines she would always be in 
love with the man, she says, but he would 
remain dedicated to his ideals. The prim 
spinster won t be stampeded. No actress 
in films has displayed the versatility of 



Winter Meeting" Century. 

Bette Davis. She can sub 
merge her usual vivacioui 
self into a character anc 
completely lose herself. Sb( 
does not stop at the beaut;, 
kit, for she will age or dis 
guise her looks with 
thoroughness that is alto 
gether unusual in the 
accepted film glamour. Anc 
she has made the transitior 
from ingenue to adult rolef 
like no other actress W!K 
has achieved stardon 
through the cinema. 
* * * 

In "The Great Waltz," al 
the Liberty, Luise Rainer 
Fernand Gravet (Frencl: 
star of "The King and th 
Chorus Girl") and Milizs 
Korjus, brilliant European 
opera star and Continental 
beauty, head the cast 
Gravet plays Strauss, Luis? 
Rainer, Poldi, his wife, and 
Miliza Korjus, Carla, tht 
singer he adored but whc 
sent him back to his wife who loved him 
The story covers Strauss rise to fame, hi? 
marriage, his great love, his opera triumph 
the Revolution, and finally as an old man 
his triumph at the court of Emperor Fran? 
Josef. Spectacular opera sequences with 

[Turn to page 38."] 




Loretta Young. 



28 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




NOW! (1 

ia /t 




Make your covered 
buttons this easy way 

WITH THE NEW JIFFY RE- 
COYERABLE BUTTON MOULD 



Here s good news for the home 
dressmaker. A new, simple way 
to make your own buttons to 
match any frock. And look at all 
these advantages. You can re 
cover the Jiffy Button Mould as 
often as you like. Any type of 
material can be used. It only 
takes a few minutes to prepare a 
complete set of buttons and 
they cannot come apart in use. 

Ask to see them at your store now. 



I. Cover dome 
with material. 



2. Fold material over 
rim of dome and in 
sert back-plate, then 
insert locking-ring. 



CANNOT COME APART IN USE 



3. Button complete. 



H any difficulty in obtaining 
write the manufacturers: 

AUSTRALIAN BUTTONS A 

BUCKLES PTY. LTD.. 

40 Dawson Street, SYDNEY. 

Telephone: MX 1149. 




MADK IN 4 HANDY 

No. 11 SI SI 

Site approx. J" | M |" 

Price per 

picket: 

Contenti: 



Regd. 



l/61d l/8d 1/H 
IDoz. IDox. IDoc. 

POSTAGE PAID 



A. soft collar hint . . . 




^~ 

Prevent the 
five o clock 
^ collar collapse by 
lightly starching col 
lars with Robin Starch. 
Robin is the easy starch 
that gives the expert finish. 

ROBIN 

Starch 



TO YOU** 



* 





Dip hair brushes in tepid water and 
ammonia without wetting the backs, till 
quite clean. Einse in clean, cold water and 
stand them up on end to dry. 



Bemove fly spots from windows and mir 
rors with spirits of wine, or wash with 
sand soap; then rub well with a damp 
newspaper and polish with a dry one. 



ARE YOU SLOWLY 
POISONING YOURSELF? 

Remove the Cause 

WHEN waste matter Is allowed 
to accumulate In the colon it has 
three effects. It weakens the 
muscular power of the body to 
remove It. It creates poisonous 
products which through the cir 
culation reach every cell in the 
body. It forms a breeding- 
ground for germs by the mil 
lions. That is the reason high 
authority to-day regards consti 
pation as primarily respons ; ble 
for eighty-five cases in every 
hundred of serious illness. Way 
specialists all over the world 
have made internal cleanness 
their slogan. 

Coloseptic overcomes the pos 
sibility* of Autoxima from the 
Hords auto (self), toxin (poison) 
by inducing better Internal 
Cleanness. 

Coloseptic is the product of In 
tensive research to find a remedy 
which would combat constipa 
tion at its source, the colon. 

A level teaspoonful in a glass 
of water morning or night, once 
or twice a week, is sufficient after 
perfect relief is obtained. 

COLOSEPTIC 

FOR BETTER 
INTERNAL CLEANNESS 

At all chemist* and stores. 

4231 



weave a web for romance 




His eyes will be caught, his 
heart bewitched by soft, 

graceful hands kept forever 
lovely with creamy, beautifying 
Hinds now specially enriched 
wifh lanolin, 

Hinds 



cream 



1 wo handy s/zes 
H.5.4 - : 



verywhere 



"He was a strong, silent man. His friends 
thought him clever. He knew when to hold 
his tongue, and that passed for mental 
strength." Dickens. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



29 



WINE 



[A most attractive design for the larger 

Materials required: 10 ozs. 3-ply wool in 
wine, and 1 oz. light blue wool for trim 
mings, and 9 buttons to match. One set of 
No. 11 needles. 

Measurements: Length, 23 inches; bust, 
38/40 inches; sleeve, 19^ inches. 

Tension: 9 sts. and IT rows equals 1 inch. 

Abbreviatioss: K., knit; p., purl; wl. 
fwd., wool forward; si., slip; st., stitch; 
st.-st., stocking-stitch; beg.,, beginning; 
dec., decrease; rep., repeat; inc., increase; 
tog., together. 

To Make the Back. 

Cast on 135 sts., work in double knitting 
as follows: 

1st row K. 1, bring wl. fwd. as for purl 
ing, si. 1 purlways; rep. from beg. to end 
ing k. 1. 

2nd row SI. 1 purlways, k. 1; rep. to 
ending si. 1 purlways. 

Rep. these two rows 7 times (16 rows in 
all). 

Work next 46 rows in st.-st. 

Continuing in st.-st., inc. at each end of 
next, then every 8lii row, until 157 sts. on 
needle. 

Complete 14 inches in depth (154 rows). 

Shape Armhole: Cast off 2 sts. at beg. of 
the next 6 rows, then dec. at each end of 
the next 3 rows (139 sts. on needle). 















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figure and suitable for a Mothers Day Gift.] 

Change to st.-st. and continue for 60 
rows. Now inc. each end of next then 
every 8th row until 137 sts. on needle. 

Complete 19 inches in length. 

Shape Top: Cast off 4 sts. at beg. of next 
2 rows, right siuo facing, and 2 sts. at beg. 
of next 2 rows, wrong side facing. Then 
dec. at each end of every other row until 
37 sts. remain. K. 2 tog. to ending k. 1, 
casting off at same time. 

Work another sleeve to correspond. 

To Make Up. 

Join sides, shoulders and sleeves. Set in 
sleeves, easing fulness to shoulder line. 
Using a set of No. 11 needles pick up 1 st. 
into each around fronts and neck. Work 
ing in double knitting complete 5 rows. 

6th row Right side of front, work 6 
sts., cast off 4, (work 14, cast off 4) 8 
times, work in d.k. to end. 

Note: 9th hole should fall in line with 
beg. of front neck shaping. . 

Cast on 4 sts. over each of the cast off 
4 in next row. Complete 12 rows, cast off 
in rib. 

To Embroider Bird Design. 

Working 6 sts. in from the ribbing either 
side, mark position for design, one between 
the top 2 buttonholes and another about 
mid-way. 

Now working is French 
knots, chain st. or cross st. 
as illustrated in blue, fill in 
the design, leaving open 
the space for the eye. 

Now reverse pat. and 
work other side of cardigan 
to match. 



Complete 84 rows of armhole shaping 
(7J inches in depth). 

Shape Neck and Shoulders: Cast off 12 
sts., k. 39, cast off 37, k. 51. 

Cast off 12 at the beg. of the next 4 rows, 
starting from armhole end and dec. neck 
edge on first 3 rows. 

Fasten off. 

Work other shoulder likewise. 
Right Front. 

Cast on 72 sts. and work in double knit 
ting for the first 16 rows. 

St.-st. 46 rows. 

Now inc. at end of next row, then at 
same edge on every 8th row until 83 sts. 
on needle and seam measures same as back 
(14 inches) to Armhole Shaping. 

Shape Armhole: Cast off 4 at the beg. of 
the next 2 rows, starting from armhole 
edge, then dec. at same end on next 4 rows 
(71 sts. on needle). 

Shape Neck: Dec. at front edge on next 
row, then every 3rd row until 48 sts. 
remain. 

Complete 88 rows of armhole shaping t 

Shape Shoulder: Cast off 12 at the beg. 
of the next 4 rows starting from armhole 
end. 

Fasten off. 

Work left front the same, reversing all 
shapings. 

Sleeves. 

Cast on 107 sts. and work in d.k. for the 
first 16 rows. 



Beauty Competitions. 

We have protested at various times about 
the exploitation of yo^ung womanhood by 
these so-called beauty competitions which 
are generally sponsored by some commer 
cial interest or other. Both in England and 
America the public have expressed their 
"resentment against these displays in no 
uncertain terms, and now Cardinal Gilroy, 
Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney, has 
voiced his detestation of such exhibitions: 

"It is a tragedy for a nation that the 
virtue, refinement and nobility of its future 
mothers are being undermined in their 
youth," said the Cardinal. "Unfortunately, 
that is precisely what is happening here in 
Sydney. Competitions have been arranged 
in which young girls, scantily clad, are in 
vited to display themselves publicly, and 
allow themselves to be photographed. 
Those displays are vulgar. No woman 
should allow herself to be exploited. The 
exhibitions banished modesty and de 
stroyed the refinement of all who took part 
in them. I fervently hope that the girl 
hood of this city will, as a body, reject the 
invitation of vested interests to partici 
pate in these unbecoming displays and 
exhibitions," he said. 



There are so many of us who love our 
mother in the abstract, and we think we 
have done a lot when we give her a present 
on Mothers Day. Why not Mothers Day 
all the time! 



To Make Trimming for 
Yoke. 

Make a plait of 8 strands 
of wool and sufficient in 
length to go across back, 
over shoulders to fpont and 
across fronts to meet in line 
with top buttonhole or just 
above. Join neatly and 
secure the ends. 

To Finish. 

Press well on the wrong 
side under a damp cloth 
and warm iron. 

Sew on buttons at finish. 
-- 



Baldness. 

In Chicago an American 
Medical Association has 
given it forth to the world 
that: "Neither massage, 
mechanical devices, tonics 
or ultra violet light, hor 
mones, vitamins or any 
treatment will regenerate 
hair in ordinary baldness." 
A forthright and rather 
sudden statement. Properly 
applied massage has worked 
wonders in many cases in 
restoring the hair. There 
are, of course, instances of 
baldness that nothing can 
effect; but there are many 
cases of thinning hair and 
actual bald" patches that 
massage and properly 
applied treatments have 
restored. 




30 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Today s 
Suggestion 

by ELIZABETH COOKE 




KRAFT GOLDEN GLORY CASSEROLE 



Cut three hard cooked eggs in half 
lengthwise. Remove yolks, mash and 
combine with two tablespoons Kraft 
Mayonnaise. Season with salt and 




pepper and fill the whites with the 
mixture. Cook 6 ozs. spaghetti or 
macaroni in boiling salted water until 
tender. Drain and place in a shallow 
casserole. 




I/"" 

I f M/he/? 
# <L there s on/y one cheese fo use 

- KRAFT CHEPPAK 




VI, o 07S shredded Kraft Cheese 
into a double boiler with cup milk. 
\. lien siuuumiy melted, mix half of it 
thoroughly with the spaghetti. 

Arrange the stuffed eggs on top of 
the casserole and pour the remainder of 
the cheese sauce on top of the* eggs. 

Bake 20 minutes in a moderate oven 
(350F.) Place the casserole on a 
warmed plate and surround with grilled 
tomato halves. 

IMPORTANT. Always use Kraft 

Cheese for your cooking. It melts 

easier, cooks more smoothly, tastes 
extra delicious. 



soys ELIZABETH COOKE famous Kraft Cookery and Nutrition Expert 



Elizabeth Cooke is right. Kraft Cheese 
is best for cooking, and for salads, 
sandwiches, savouries and snacks, too. 
Kraft Cheese tastes better because it s 
blended better. Every delicious mouth 
ful has the same rich, tempting flavour. 
Not too mild, not too strong just 
too good for words! And, the same 
creamy smoothness and freshness is in 
every packet. 



Packed With Nourishing Goodness 

Kraft Cheese is rich in high quality 
proteins, Vitamins A, B 2 and D, plus 
the valuable milk minerals, calcium 
and phosphorus. 

Kraft Cheese Saves You Money 
Kraft Cheese stays FRESH in its 
special foil wrapper. No rind. No 
waste. You enjoy every bit right 
down to the last delicious slice. 



KRAFT CHEESE 




Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



31 



Hobble Stitch Yoked Jumper 



o-Q-o- 



o-Q-o- 



A six-row pattern makes the hobble stitch on yokes, neck, sleeves and hem line. 



Materials: 7 ozs. of 3-plywool; 1 pair 
of No. 12 knitting needles; 6 No. 12 knit 
ting needles pointed each end; yard 
matching ribbon or binding; 6 small but 
tons. 

Measurements: Length, 24 ins.; to fit up 
to a 34-in. bust measurement; sleeve seam, 
6$ ins. 

Tension: 17 sts. to 2 ins. in width and 
25 rows to 2 ins. in depth. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; sts., 
stitches; st.-st., stocking-stitch; rep., re 
peat; tog., together; inc., increase; dec., 
decrease; patt., pattern; beg., beginning; 
ins., inches. 

Front. 

With the pair of needles cast on 130 sts. 
loosely and do not k. into backs of sts. on 
1st row. Work 16 rows in st.-st., then 
make a hem as follows: 

Next row Insert needle into first st. on 
next row and at same time into first st. on 
cast-on edge and k. these 2 sts. tog., * 
insert needle into next st. and to next st. 
on cast-on edge and k. these 2 sts. tog.; 
rep. from * to end. Next row P. Work 
2 more rows in st.-st., then work the patt. 
band as follows: 

1st row P. 2nd row * K. 5 (pick up 
thread between st. just knitted and next 
st. on left-hand needle and p. twice into 
this st.) 3 times, k. 5; rep. from * to end. 
3rd row* P. 5, k. 6, p. 5; rep. from * to 
end. 4th row * K. 5, p. 6, k. 5; rep. from 
* to end. 5th row * P. 4, then slip the 6 
k. sts. over the first st. on left-hand needle 
and off the needle, p. this st., p. 5; rep. 
from * to end. 6th row P. These 6 rows 
form the patt. band. Change to st.-st. and 
continue in this until work measures 9 ins. 
from beg., then inc. 1 st. at both ends of 
next row and every following 8th row 
until there are 140 sts. Continue without 
shaping until work measures 15 ins. from 
beg., ending with a p. row. 

Armhole and Neck Shaping: Next row 
K. 2 tog., k. to last 2 sts., k. 2 tog. Next 
row P. 61, turn. Next row K. 61. Next 
row P. 2 tog., p. 57, turn. Next row 
K. 58. Next row P. 56, turn. Next row 
K. 54, k. 2 tog. Continue in this way, dec. 
at armhole edge on every 3rd row and at 
the same time working 2 sts. less at neck 
edge on every p. row until 2 sts. remain. 
Leave these sts. on a spare needle. 

With wrong side of work facing you 
slip the first (centre) 16 sts. on to a spare 
needle, join wool to remaining sts. and p. 
to end. Next row K. 61, turn. Next row 
P. Next row K. 2 tog., k. 57, turn. Now 
work up this side to match first, then cast 
off all sts. of front. 

Back. 

Work as given for front. 
Sleeves. 

With the pair of No. 12 needles cast on 
90 sts. and work the hem and patt. band 
as given for front, then continue in st.-st. 
until work measures 6^ ins. rrom beg. Now 
shape top by dec. 1 st. at both ends of next 
row and every following 3rd row until 60 
sts. remain. Cast off on a k. row. 
Yoke. 

Join decreased edges of front, back and 
sleeves by back-stitches, then, with right 
side of work facing you, and using te 6 
needles, count 6 sts. to the right of centre 



back and pick up and k. these 6 sts., then 
pick up and k. 54 sts. along yoke, 58 sts. 
along top of left sleeve, 108 sts. round 
front neck, 58 sts. along top of right 
sleeve, 54 sts. along back yoke, then pick 
up and k. 6 sts. from the same 6 sts. at 
beg. of row. This makes a firm overlapping 
back opening. 

Work 5 rows in st.-st., beg. with a p. 
row, but k. first 
and last st. on 
every p. row. Next 
row * P. 5, p. 2 
tog., p. 3; rep. 
from * to last 4 
sts.; p. 4. Now 
work the patt. 
band, beg. with 
the 2nd row, after 
which work 2 rows 
in st.-st., then 
beg. shaping yoke 
as follows: 

1st row K. 15 
(k. 2 tog. through 
back loops, k. 12, 
k. 2 tog., k. 4) 7 
times, k. 12, then 
rep. the bracket 
sts. 7 times, k. 3. 

Work 7 rows in 
st.-st., beg. with a 
p. row. 9th row 
K. 15, (k. 2 tog. 
through back 
loops, k. 10, k. 2 
tog., k. 4) 7 times, 
k. 12, then rep. 
the bracket sts. 7 
times, k. 3. 

Work 7 rows in 
st.-st. Continue to 
dec. as before, 
working 2 sts. less 
between each dec. 
on next row and 
every following 
8th row until 6 
dec. rows have 
been worked from 
beg. 

Work 3 rows in 
st.-st., then work 
5 rows of the patt. 
band, but beg. and 
ending 2nd row 
with k. 6 instead 
of k. 5. 6th row 
* P. 6, p. 2 tog., 
p. 1; rep. from * 
to last 7 sts., p. 7. 
Work 18 rows in 
st.-st. 

Cast off loosely. 
Turn over a 
matching hem and 
sew down lightly. 

Making Up. 

Press work lightly on the wrong side 
with a warm iron and damp cloth. Face 
the back opening with ribbon or binding. 
Join side and sleeve seams. Work 6 loops 
on right side of back opening, then sew 
on buttons to correspond with the loops. 
Press seams. 



Sunday Broadcasts. 

Explaining why strict Sabbatarian rules 
had been abandoned for Sunday broadcast 
ing, Sir William Haley, Director-General 
of the B.B.C., told the British Council of 
Churches in London that they had to start 
by holding listeners. "It is important," 
he said, "to meet their just needs, and 
Sunday entertainment is, to our minds, 
one of them. So now we have a freer Sun 
day programme than before the war." Sir 
William said that the B.B.C. had added 
religious controversy to its broadcasts be 
cause it had discovered the need among 
millions of people to-day who were hunger 
ing for information on spiritual issues. 




Anglo-U.S. naval manoeuvres in Ameri 
can waters this month promise a big occa 
sion for research-and-development experts, 
particularly atomic scientists who will be 
observers. 



"The courage we desire and prize is not 
the courage to die decently, but to live 
manfully." Thomas Carlyle. 



SUBSCRIBERS! PLEASE NOTE. 

When renewing subscriptions kindly 
state month of commencement. PRINT 
name and address (including State) 
clearly. Always quote receipt number 
when corresponding. 



32 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




Lady Maureen He Poer Trench 



For that 




Blush-Cleanse your skin 

Lady Maureen Le Poer Trench is unusually lovely with 
light brown hair and greenish-brown eyes. Lady Maureen 
says : "There s something about a Blush-Cleanse with 
Pond s Cold Cream that gives skin a wonderful, fresh-alive 
feeling. It brings up a lovely rosy colour and makes my face 
beautifully clean and so soft." 

HOW TO "BLUSH-CLEANSE" 

1. Rouse your face with warm water. Dip deep into Pond s Cold 
Cream and swirl it in soft, creamy circles up over your face and throat. 
Tissue off. 

2. Blush-rinse. Cream again with snowy-soft Pond s Cold Cream. 
Swirl about 25 more creamy circles over your face and throat. Tissue well. 

3. Tingle your face with a splash of cold water. Blot dry. 

RESULT : Fresh color floods your skin. It has an 
instant clean, sweet look, an instant softer, silkier feel! 



PC9-4 





No one knows 
when hair has 
beenlNECTO D 

(it looks so natural!) 




IN.7.10 



ECTO 



RAPID 

liXlR COLOURrNO 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1 949 



33 



OUR RAINBOW CARDIGAN 



Brightly coloured for winter 

Start knitting this charming cardigan 
right away in readiness for the winter 
months ahead. The rainbow pattern is 
easy to knit and is an excellent way of 
using up oddments of wool, for it doesn t 
matter how many colours you use. The 
back and fronts are worked in the coloured 
wools and the sleeves, border, cuffs and 
front band in the main colour. 

Materials: 6 ozs. of 3-ply knit 
ting wool, in main colour; 1 oz. 
each of 2nd, 3rd and 4th colours; 
1 pair each of Nos.-9 and 12 knit 
ting needles; 7 buttons. 

Measurements: Length from 
shoulder to lower edge, 19 ins.; 
to fit a 34-35-inch bust; sleeve 
seam, 18 ins. 

Tension: 7 sts. in width and 9 
rows in depth to 1 in. 

Abbreviations: K., knit: p., 
purl; st., stitch; sts., stitches; 
beg., begin or beginning ; alt., 
alternate or alternately; inc., in 
crease or increasing; dec., de 
crease or decreasing; ptn., pat 
tern; rep., repeat; tog., together; 
cont., continue. 

The Back. 

Using main colour and No. 12 
needes cast on 1-07 sts. and work 
in ribbing as follows: 1st row 
K. 1, * p. 1, k. 1, rep. from * to 
end. 2nd row P. 1, * k. 1, p. 1, 
rep. from * to end of row. Eep. 
these 2 rows 16 times (34 rows 
altogether). 

Change to No. 9 needles. Pro 
ceed in the patterned design as 
follows: 

1st row of ptn. Join on 2nd 
colour. * K. 3, slip 1, rep. from 
*, finishing with k. 3, instead of 
slip 1. 2nd row P. 3rd row 
Join on 3rd colour. K. 1, * slip 
1, k. 3, rep. from *, ending slip 1. 
k. 1, instead of k. 3. 4th row P. 
5th row Join on 4th colour. Rep. 
1st row of ptn. 6th row Rep. 
2nd row of ptn. 7th row Take 
up main colour and rep. 3rd row 
of ptn. 8th row P. in _ main 
colour. These 8 rows form the 
ptn. throughout. 

Note: Do not break off the 
wools, but carry them loosely up 
the side and k. the first st. of 
each knit row with the last colour 
used and the new colour. 

Inc. 1 st. each end of needle^ on 
the next row and every following 
Cth row 6 times (121 sts.), working the 
extra sts. into the ptn. as the work pro 
ceeds. If you watch the ptn. it is quite 
easy to keep it correct as the "slipped" 
sts. stand out and act as a guide. Cont. 
working ptn. until back measures 12^ ins. 
from the beg., finishing after a p. row. 

Shape Armholes: Cast off 4 sts. at beg. 
of next 2 rows. Dec. 1 st. each end of 
every row 9 times, leaving 95 sts. Cont. 
in ptn. without further shaping until arm- 
holes measure 6 ins. in depth, measured 
straight up. 

Shape Shoulders: Cast off 10 sts. at the 
beg. of each of the next G rows. Cast off. 
TJie Left Front. 

* With the main colour wool cast on 59 
sts. on No. 12 needles and work in same 



and long-sleeved for warmth. ->Q<* 

ribbing as on lower edge of Back for 34 
rows. Change to No. 9 needles, join on 
1st colour wool and work in ptn. as on 
Back for 8 rows. * Inc. 1 st. at beg. of 
next row and on every following Gth row 
(at same edge) 6 times more (66 sts.). 
Cont. without further inc., until front 
measures same as Back up to armholes, 
finishing after a p. row. 




Now shape armhole and beg. front shap 
ing: 

1st row: Shape Armhole Cast off 5 sts., 
ptn. to last 2 sts., work 2 tog. 2nd row 
P. to last 2 sts., p. 2 tog. 3rd row Work 
2 tog., ptu. to end. 4th row P. to last 2 
sts., p. 2 tog. Oth row K. 2 tog., ptn. 
until 2 sts. remain, k. 2 tog. Now dec. 1 
st. at armhole edge on every row 6- times, 
then on every alt. row 4 times, at the same 
time dec. 1 st. at front edge on every fol 
lowing 4th row until 32 remain. Cont. 
without shaping until armhole measures 7 
ins. in depth, finishing at armhole edge. 

Shape Shoulder: * Cast off 10 sts., work 
to neck and back again. Rep. from * once 
more. Cast off. 



The Right Front. 

Work as for Left Front from * to *. 
Inc. 1 st. at end of next row and on every 
following 6th row (at same edge) 6 times 
more (66 sts.). Cont. without further inc., 
until front measures the same as the Left 
Front, finishing after a ptn. row. 

Shape Armhole: 1st row Cast off 5 sts., 
p. to last 2 sts., p.- 2 tog. 2nd row Ptn. 
to last 2 sts., k. 2 tog. 3rd row P. 2 tog., 
p. to end. 4th row Ptn. to last 2 sts., k. 
2 tog. 5th row P. 2 tog., p. to last 2 sts., 
p. 2 tog. Now finish as for Left Front by 
following the same directions. 

The Sleeves. 

With the main colour wool and 
No. 12 needles cast on 55 sts. 
and work in ribbing as for lower 
edge of Back for 3 ins. Change 
to No. 9 needles, and proceed in 
st.-st., for 6 rows. Inc. 1 st. each 
end of next row and every follow 
ing Gth row until there are 91 
sts. Cont. straight until sleeve 
measures 18 ins. from beg. Cast 
off 4 sts. at beg. of next 2 rows, 
then dec. 1 st. at beg. of every 
row until 43 sts. remain, then 
dec. 1 st. at each end of the next 
10 rows. Cast eff. 

The Front Band. 
With No. 12 needles and main 
wool cast on 13 sts. 1st row 
(right side) K. 2, p. 1, * k. 1, 
p. 1, rep. from * until 2 sts. 
remain, k. 2. 2nd row K. 1, * 
p. 1, k. 1, rep. from * to end. 
Rep. these 2 rows until 5 rows 
have been worked. 1st Button 
hole row (wrong side) K. 1, 
cast off 5 sts., rib to end. 2nd 
Buttonhole row Rib 7, cast on 5 
hts. over those cast off to com 
plete the buttonhole, k. 1. Rib 
16 rows more. Rep. the last 13 
rows until the 7th buttonhole has 
been finished. Work straight for 
length required to fit both fronts 
and the back neck edge. Do not 
cast off until all but an inch has 
been sewn on. 

To Make Up the Cardigan. 
First press the back and two 
.fronts on the wrong side with a 
hot iron over a damp cloth, omit 
ting all ribbing. Join the shoulder 
seams, set the sleeves into the 
armholes and press these seams. 
Sew the front band in position, 
beginning at the buttonhole end, 
which is sewn to the Right Front, 
and stretching the band slightly 
as it is sewn on, then cast off the 
stitches. Join the sleeve and side 
seams and press these seams. Sew 
buttons to Left Front to corre 
spond with the buttonholes. 



You can disguise scratches on furniture 
so effectively that none but your own 
"eagle eye" will be able to detect them. 
Get a soft brush and the iodine bottle, and 
gently paint the scratches. Leave to dry, 
and give a second coat if you think it 
necessary. Then, when the iodine is dry, 
polish the whole thing very thoroughly. 

STAMPS NOT ACCEPTED. 

Readers are again reminded that 
we do not take postage stamps in 
payment of pattern orders. Only 
postal notes or money orders will 
be accepted. 



34 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Irasso 




Cathrine the Great is credited with say 
ing: "If the Eussians knew how to read, 
they would write me off." Since that day 
many kings and queens have been written 
off owing to their own misconduct. 



To clean chamois leather wash in warm 
water with a little ammonia; press out the 
water, but do not wring. Hang in the sun 
to dry quickly, and pull into shape while 
drying, or it will be very stiff. 




PTURE UNTOLD PLEASURE 

Friends invitations 
outings! 

LEARN AT HOME 



Be playing all your 

Favourite tunes and 

Screen hits in a few 

weeks with a 

SAMPSON 

POSTAL COURSE 

costs nothing if 
not satisfied. 





IT S A 

REVELATION 
IN MUSIC 



LEARN AT 
HOME FOR 

2/6 

WEEKLY 



No scales or exercises. 

No need to be clever. 

Beginners start playing 
in 30 minutes. 

LESSONS 
INSTRUMENTS 

From 2/6 weekly wherever 

you live for either 

if Banjo Mandolin 

if Hill-billy Guitar 

if Steel Guitar 

fa Piano Accordion 

if Button Accordion 

fa Mouth Organ 

if Piano if UkuieU 

if Banjo Ukulele 

if Saxophone 

ir Violin if Clarinet 



f REE. Write for free catalogue 
and booklet ,(state instrument 
favoured) to 

SAMPSONS, Dept. C 

48 1 Kent St. 
Box 4I84X, G.P.O., Sydney 



Australia s FOREMOST School 



Make 

baby s 

hair 




If far from town send postal note or 
stamps to Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney. 



|SKIN DISEASES 



For Free Advice on all Skin Diseases 
send 2yd. stamp for Examination 
Chart to 

DERMOPATH1C INSTITUTE 

National Bank Building, 
271-9 Collins St., Mclb., C.I. 



C.I. F6822 | 

mmmmm 



To keep piano keys white make a paste 
of lemon-juice and whiting. Let it dry 
on, then brush off very carefully. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



37 




Lovely Ann Todd, Paramount star, 
doesnt mind whether it s cold or even 
snowy; she is ready for it all. She 
snuggles into this cape collar, which is 
trimmed with fur. Her hat is halo type, 
trimmed with fur and tied under the 
chin with velvet ribbon. Coat is bustled 
at the back and double-breasted. 



Be Graceful. 

Take particular notice of the women in 
a tram car. Watch them carefully as they 
take the-ir seats. One flops down limply, 
dropping everything including her meta 
phorical bundle: another sits hunched up, 
or, better still, all screwed up; a stout 
woman sits gingerly on the edge of the 
seat as if afraid to trust her weight on it; 
while fully half the young women and girls 
are painfully conscious of their hands and 
feet. 

The woman who sits down gracefully is 
rare indeed. 

A well-poised woman learns to place her 
feet firmly, but lightly, on the floor, letting 
the weight rest on the foot nearest the 
chair, and to sink gracefully down. 

A wise rule to remember is: Put your 
foot on the floor and leave it there. 

Sureness on the feet is the first lesson 
that women" should le;mi. 

Here are some of the requirements for 
the lessons of grace: 

A knowledge of your own limitations. 

A training of the recalcitrant members 
of the body. 

A serene, kindly and sincere mind, which 
will add a softness to the expression and 
give a dignified bearing to the body. 

And, finally, don t stand on your dignity 
carry it about with you. 



Soak slimy sponges in strong tartaric 

su id and water for at least 24 hours, rinse 

in two or three waters and dry in the air. 

Repeat if necessary. New sponges should 

*be washed in the same way. 



J To smile at the jest that plants a thorn 

"gAnother a breast is to become a principal 

:he mischief. Too many so-called jokes 



MEN ONLY ! 



A brand new range of 
designs for men only 
makes up the new Sun- 
glo Knitting Book 116, 
now on sale. Sun-glo 
books are at newsagents 
and retailers, or order 
from "Knitting Book 
Dept.", Alexandria Spin 
ning Mills, 30 Grosvenor 
St., Sydney. Price, 7}d. 
(posted, 9d.) Frock or 
Children s Wear Books, 
1/1 (posted, 1/2$). 



SHRINKPROOF 




KNITTING 

Made \n Aust. by F. IV. Hughes 
Pty. Ltd., at their Alexandria 
Stunning Mills. Distributors: 
Pater son, Lamg 6" Bruce Ltd. 




sfy/ es 




CUT OUT AND POST 



Alexandria Spinning Mills Dept, E563., 

30 Grosvenor Street, Sydney. 

Please send me free illustrated folder of Sun-glo styles. 

I enclose l}d. in stamps for postage. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



....STATE 



Wonderful FREE BOOK proves there is 

NO NEED TO WEAR GLASSES 



XTUNDREDS of men, women and young people have 
written to me, worried and fearful about their eyes. 
After reading the amazing free book, " Better Natural 
Sight Without Wearing Glasses," they have found that 
there is a way to regain normal vision without the need 
of glasses at all. 

My patients include men for the Navy and Air 
Force, and also men qualifying for all trades 
and professions : Civil Aviators, Civil Ser 
vants, Clerks, Motorists, Engineers, Policemen, 
Railwaymen, Engine Drivers people whose 
careers depend upon their eyes. 





Try this simple test 
for ASTIGMATISM. 
To the normal eye 
the width and depth 
of colour in the 
black bars of all 
four circles are uni 
form. When astig 
matism exists there 
is variation in the 
width and depth of 
bars. 



If you suffer from 

SHORT SIGHT LONG SIGHT 

FAILING SIGHT ASTIGMATISM 

TIRED EYES, GLARE, 

TURNED EYES 

STRAIN EYE HEADACHES 

or any other eye weakness (except 

diseased eyes) write for my BOOK 

or call for free consultation at 

EYESIGHT TRAiNiNG 

(Ferguson System) 

Room 604H, Manchester Unity Bldg. 
185 Elizabeth St., Sydney. MA.5455 



HOW TO GET MY BOOK FREE 
Just write (enclosing 2 Id. postage) or 
call TO-DAY for 32-page Free 
Booklet, "Better Natural Sight With 
out Wearing Glasses" This includes 
testimonials from happy people who have 
discarded glasses. It will open up a new 
avenue of hope for you. 

FREE CONSULTATION 
Ring MA 5455 for Free Consultation. 



38 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1 949 



The woven-wire mattress is now 
superseded. 



Have you got used to suffering on a 
sagging coiled spring mattress like this? 
Well, how about really enjoying going 
to bed again? Read about this new 
Vono Spring Base from England. 



Made in England. 




Note this illustra 
tion of the Vono Spring 
base. Supporting cross 
bars take care of the 
heavy part of the body 
but are not used under 
the head or feet, where 
little weight has to be 
supported. A feeling of 
resting on air results. 
Any mattress can be 
used on a Vono Spring 
Base but greatest com 
fort comes with a Vono 
Inner Spring mattress 
made in England. 



Look for 

the bed with 

the 



VONO 



SPRING BASE 




It makes any type 

of mattress far 

i 

more comfy. 



All leading furniture manu 
facturers are now fitting their bed 
steads with Vono Spring bases. 
You ll see them in stores everywhere. 
Or you can buy a Vono Spring base 
separately as a replacement for youi 
present old woven wire mattress. 



At all leading stores 



THE PLAY AND FILM 

[From page 27.] 

Albertina Raseh ballets, courtroom epi 
sodes, scenes in the Vienna Wooda, Strauss 
debut at Dommayer s Casino, the street 
riots, and the great ballroom scene provide 
spectacle for Strauss music sung by Aftliza 
Korjus to -lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. 
Dmitri Tiomkin arranged the music and 
Dr. Arthur Guttmann, first conductor of 
the Strauss Theatre in Vienna, conducted 
the 90-piece symphony orchestras and 

choruses. 

* * * 

It has become the fashion for film writers 
and star boosters to depict actors and 
actresses as mortals far removed from the 
ordinary run of life. You know the kind 
of stuff if they had not been in the film 
business they would have starred as 
doctors, businessmen and archbishops. 
"Film stars," said one commentator, "are 
normal people. Indeed, some of their re 
marks would lead one to believe they were 
lacking even average intelligence. Why. 
then, raise them to the ranks of supermen 
and women?" 

* * * 

Fully 90 per cent, of all the "alcoholic" 
drinks served in motion pictures, according 
to Warner Bros. statisticians, is made of 
tea. The rest, such as gin, champagne, 
etc., is just plain water. 

* * * 

A little-known, 27-years-old French 
actor is to play one of the most coveted 
screen roles of the year. His name is Ivan 
Desny and he will star with Ann Todd in 
Cineguild s next film, "Madeleine," story 
of a Glasgow girl who was tried for tie 
murder of her lover in the 1850 a. 



A Steedman s baby is a 
HAPPY BABY! 





When baby starts cutting tiny 
teeth, it s time to turn to Steedman s 
Powders. They work safely, and 
gently, cooling the blood stream and 
keeping baby s habits regular. 
Steedman s will ease baby through 
the difficult teething period and 
keep him healthy and contented. 



.. 
STIEEDMANiS 

POWDERS 



ON SALE AT ALL CHEMISTS 

8833 B 



BUNIOMS 



Amazing New Appliance (worn at 
night). Quickly Banishes Bunions 
by removing the cause. Sent 
on Trial! Send Outline of 
Foot and 2^d. stamp for 
Postage of Literature. 
G. Priouett Appliance Co., 
! Rawcon Place, Sydney. 




Australian Home Journal. May 2. 1949 



39 



Laurence Olivier s "Hamlet" has been 
chosen as the best picture of 1948 from 
any source by the British Film Academy. 
Award for the best British picture has 
been won by "The Fallen Idol." Best docu 
mentary is Robert Flaherty s "Louisiana 
Story," and a special award for work out 
side the feature and documentary fields 
goes to G.B. Instructional s "Atomis 
Physics." 

* * * 

"Hamlet," produced and directed by its 
star, Laurence Olivier, has been outstand 
ingly successful all over the world since it 
was first shown in London last May. It 
has been nominated for the Hollywood 
Academy Award for the best picture of 
the year. New York film critics selected 
Laurence Olivier as the year s best actor 
for his performance in the film. 

* * * 

According to the cables, film star Panl- 
ette Goddard has separated from her actor 
husband, Burgess Meredith. Distance and 
living apart has apparently been the big 
factor in this regrettable happening. 
Hubby is mostly working in New York, 
and Paulette at Hollywood. 

* * * 

As showing the depression in the film 
industry in Great Britain, no less than 
twelve studios have put the shutters up, 
and many hundreds of employees have 
been dismissed. Cinema prices have been 
reduced, and expensive productions are 
taboo. 



Foot Trouble. 

There are few foot troubles which can 
not be relieved these days. Tired feet, 
swollen feet, weak feet there s a remedy 
*for practically all of them. 

Give your feet the scrupulous attention 
that most of you do to your face, and 
they ll be no trouble to you at all. Neglect 
them, and they ll react on your looks. You 
just can t look carefree and happy walk 
with a free, swinging stride, if your feet 
hurt. 

Try hot and cold water bathing for 
tired feet. Stand the feet first in a basin 
of hot water ... as hot as you can bear. 
Then run cold water over them. Another 
hot soaking, then more cold water. 

Too, there is a medicated foot cream 
which brings marvellous relief to hot and 
tired feet, if you massage it into them 
every night. It quickly takes away all 
that burning sensation. 

DEAF? 

"CHICO" INVISIBLE 
EARPHONES, 2I/- Pr. 

Worn inside your ears, no cords or bat 
teries. Guaranteed for your Lifetime. 
"Chico" Earphones have enjoyed an un 
interrupted sale on the Australian market 
for over 20 years. Write for Free Booklet. 
HEARS EARPHONE CO., No. 30 State 
Shopping Block, Market Street, Sydney. 

Superfluous Hair 
Killed Quickly 

By "EXHAIR." Perfectly 
harmless. Guaranteed. Send 
stamped addressed envelope 
for particulars. Confidential. 
Janet Glanville. 247H Eliza 
beth Street, Sydney. 




Pimples! 

Learn WHY 
they come 
and clear 
them OUT! 



If your blood is "tired". . . lacking 
in IRON, then you get ugly 
pimples, blotchy skin and un 
sightly blemishes. 

More IRON that s the secret! 

Kellogg s All-Bran is a rich, 
natural source of iron actually 
richer than spinach. And this iron 
comes in a way that is quickly put 
to good use by your system. 

Natural Health Food 
As well as iron, this nut-sweet 
health food is an important source 
of Vitamins B,, B 2 , Niacin, Phos 
phorus and Calcium. It builds up 
your general health as it gets at 
the cause of constipation. 

Kellogg s All-Bran soon makes 
"tired blood" strong and rich . . . 
cleanses those impurities from the 
bloodstream as it cleanses internal 
impurities from the intestines. 

Don t "put up" with pimples! 

Remember! "Tired blood" and 




constipation go hand in hand. So 
get at the real cause of these 
troubles - your blood and intes 
tines. 

You ll enjoy Kellogg s All-Bran 
straight out of the packet with 
stewed fruit and milk, or just 
sprinkle it over your favorite 
breakfast cereal. Sold by all 
grocers. 




, BULK in a 
delicious 
form. 



Modern foods are often soft, 
mushy, over-cooked . . . little 
or no bulk in them. But 
Kelloffg s All-Kran supplies 
bulk in a delicious, nut-sweet 
form. This smooth-acting 
LuiK helps prepare internal 
wastes for quick, easy a.id 
daily elimination. It smarts 
your system functioning asain 
the untiirnl way. 





ALL-BRAN 



Registered Trade Mark 



40 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



AND PATS TRIBUTE TO 

AS PRO 



.. Winning Tip from youthful 
Victorian Champion Woman Cyclist 



ss IRIS BENT 




ASPRO 

DOES NOT HARM THE HEARToR STOMACH 



TiicfuolaA WuxLujcL 



A l5/-*8 



CASSEROLE DISHES 

[From page 35.] 

Skim off the fat, add ^ pint milk and cook 
for another ^ hour. Stir the juice of $ a 
lemon into the gravy before serving. 

Fry Casserole. 

One lamb s fry, ^ Ib. bacon rashers, f 
cupful soft bread crumbs, 1 large onion, 
salt, pepper and herbs to taste. Wash and 
dry the fry thoroughly, cut it in thin slices 
and roll well in flour, also the bacon 
rashers. Chop onion fine, put in a casser 
ole in alternate layers, sprinkle each layer 
well with flour and bake in moderate oven 
about 2 hours. 



Cabin Casserole. 

Six pork chops, cut inch thick; 2 cups- 
ful sliced potatoes; 2 tablespoonsful flour; 
salt and pepper; 2 cupsful milk; 1 table- 
spoonful parsley. 

Brown the chops on both sides in a hot 
frying pan. Place ,3 of the chops in a 
greased casserole and sprinkle with the 
salt and pepper. Cover with the sliced 
potatoes and sprinkle with flour over the 
top. Place the remaining pork chops on 
top, sprinkle with the parsley, salt and 
pepper, and add the heated milk. Cover 
the dish and bake for 1^ hours in a moder 
ate oven. Uncover for the last half -hour 
to brown the top. 

>-- 
Canberra Orchestra. 

It takes a judge to say in a few succinct 
sentences what most of us think of those 
parliamentary broadcasts, with their 
quaint grammatical interludes. Sir Owen 
Dixon referred to the "Canberra Orchestra" 
that could be divided into two parts 
those who played the fool and those who 
blew their own trumpets! It was at a 
gathering of the English-speaking Union. 
He also made mention of Mr. Menzies, who 
did not belong to either category, which 
removed him from "the common run of 
people you hear when you turn on the 
wireless." 




0||| 
atiire 



OIIGINATCO IN INCIAND 



OATINE Snow (Vanishing Cream) 
OATINE Cold Cream 
OATINE Powder Bas* 
OATINE Skin Tonic 
OATINE Hand Lotion 



ARE YOU OVERWEIGHT? 

To be overweight is both unhealthy and un 
lovely makes you look years older! Get rid 
of it by my perfect method. No dieting no irk 
some exercises. The sum o-f !/!/- covers the 
whole cost, no further expense. Result guaran 
teed, no matter how long-standing the fat con 
dition. Send 6d. in stamps for full particulars to 
MATRON MARION GOSS, Dept. J, 
Box 32, P.O., North Sydney, N.S.W. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



41 



Hair Conditioned? 

A few unfounded prejudices against hair 
brushing exist. Some women hesitate to 
brush the hair because they feel it will 
interfere with the wave or setting;. Others 
on seeing a few hairs on the brush rush to 
the conclusion that brushing pulls out, or 
encourages the hair to fall out. 

Properly done, brushing will actually 
prolong the life of the wave. And as for 
hair falling, any hairs that come out are 
just as well out, because they are dead 
hairs ready for the fall. Providing the hair 
follicle is normal and health}*? there should 
be a new baby hair at the root. 

We know of no harm that brushing floes. 
But what good! It cleanses the hair of 
surface dust and grime, distributes the oil 
evenly along the hairshaft, polishes the 
hair, increasing the normal lustre of the 
coat. A single brushing session will often 
soften hair that has become quite dry, 
harsh and brittle. 

If you aren t accustomed to brushing the 
hair, do start at once to form the habit. 

And don t be alarmed if the scalp feels 
a bit hurt. It will tingle. It should. That 
indicates that the blood is rushing to the 
surface, that circulation is speeding up a 
bit. "Which is exactly what you want, be 
cause the health of the scalp and hair de 
pends on the nourishment from the blood 
stream. 

Let s take for granted that your brush 
is a good one. Be sure the bristles are 
fairly long they should reach through the 
hair and over the scalp; if they merely 
ride over the hair they don t do enough. 

How to brush is the next step. Up and 
out. Never flat and down except when you 
are ready to dress the hair. 

Brushing flat and down may pu.ll the 
hair, may even upset the wave. 

But brushing strand by strand up and 
out and manueuvrin g the brush so that 
you really form a semi-circle over the scalp 
and through the hair, that acts as scalp 
treatment and cleanser in one. 



The man who waits for things to turn 
up finds his toes do it first. 



FORD PILLS 

are the gentle, tasteless, 

painless laxative for all 

your family. 

FORD PILLS 

are liked by Hospitals for 

patients before and after 

operations. 

FORD PILLS 

help remove the toxins that 

often cause your rheumatic 

aches and pains and 

headaches. 

Get Ford Pills 
in handy plastic tubes, 
2 6 everywhere K ,. 



to Boys & Girls 




Wriit Watches, Cameras. /Via -Ma DO//S. 
Fountain Pens. Many other Valuable Prizes for 
selling small parcels of tesied garden seeds. 3end 
for parcel and big catalogue of presents. Send no 
money now. only name and address. Writ? to-day 
John B. Hurray. 64 I K G.OI re Si Sv.ln.w 



Famous STAGE and RADIO star 




says: 

Now you can get HORLICKS in 
this NEW thrifty 8-oz. size!" 




Horlicks is the most nourishing 
food drink of all" says Hilda. 



"During strenuous rehearsals, 
when I feel -I need something to 
give me new life and energy, 1 
always have a Horlicks," says 
Hilda Scurr. 

Horlicks is rich in the vital 
food values you need every day. 
Horlicks will build you up, 
nourish body and nerves, induce 
deep restful sleep, and guard 
against "Night Starvation." You 
can be sure that you will enjoy 
and go on enjoying its 
delicious, satisfying flavour. Ask 
for Horlicks in the new, thrifty 
8 oz. size. 

Auk your storekeeper for 

HORLICKS 




16-oz. tin 3 7 6 
8-oz. tin 2 7 2 

(Prices slightly higher in 
country areas} 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Elegantly smart yet 
delightfully simple is the 
modern women s answer 
to fashions of long ago. 
Smart, too, is the modern 
woman who chooses 
Modess . . . the depend 
able sanitary napkin. 
Modess is softer, safer, 
more economical. It 
is made by the world s 
largest manufacturers 
of surgical dressings 
your guarantee of 
superior quality. 



MODERN WOMEN PREFER 



it VEMO deodorant 
powder, the perfect 
aid to personal 
hygiene. 



SANITARY 
-* cel&un 




cA 0(i}aica J&teJJe/igJ 
v / / 



Retain the natural 
loveliness of your hair. 

Twlce-a-day, massage your scalp 
with Koko. Koko tones up the 
hair roots and eradicates unsightly 
dandruff. Koko is free from oil, 
grease or dye and is perfectly safe 
to use on the most delicate scalp. 
Ask your chemist for: 

KOKO 

- FOR THE HAIR 



MAN WORKED OVERTIME 



WHILE LEG HEALED 

Varex Treatment has been quite suc 
cessful on that bad leg of mine a miracle 

in fact. In five weeks the wound healed 
up completely and I never lost an hour** 
work from the first day. In fact, I have 
been working overtime on it three days a 
week. I have not failed to tell people of 
your simple and cheap cure." Write 
to-day for free Varex Booklet. Ernest 
Healey, Pharmaceutical Chemist, Varex, 
Rooms 523-524, 5th Floor, St. James 
Buildine, 109W Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



Bring 

South Sea 

Romance 

Into 

Your 

Home! 




Learn to Play a Tune 
in 30 Minutes 

on 

Hawaiian Steel Guitar, 

Spanish Guitar, Ukulele, 

Hill-Billy Guitar, 

Cow-Boy Guitar, 

Mandolin and Banjo-Mandolin. 

NO TEDIOUS SCALES OR EXERCISES 

Play a Tune at your First Lesson! 
The Hawaiian Club will teach you in 
the comfort of your own home, and the 
cost is only 2/6 per week. Send for full 
particulars of the Hawaiian Club s 
specialised Postal Courses. 

POST THIS COUPON JO-DAY 



" The Hawaiian Club," AHJ 

Kembla Building. 58 Margaret St., Sydney. ! 
Please send me by return mail complete 
details of your Home Study Course. Te// I 
me how i can obtain an Hawaiian Steel I 
Guitar, Spanish Guitar, Hill-Billy Guitar ! 
Ukulele, Mandolin and Banjo-Mandolin. 



Name . 
Address 



This Offer obtainable ONLY from the 
above address. 



"JM HAPPY- 
TKTHMG TIME! 

for every babe in the safest, most natural 
way with Martin 6. Pleasance Teething 
Powders 

They stop pain and restlessness. Keep 
motions gentle and regular, and the 
bloodstream cool. Provide Calcium for 
sound, healthy teeth 

For over 80 years. Mothers everywhere 
havt insisted an 

MARTI N& PLEASANCE 

Tr///WG ,/ 
POWDfRS I 6 BOX 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



43 



Our Cittle Vutch TH.Ul Cardigan 



Will make his head 

Gay Dutch figures and cute little coloured 
windmills adorn this smart knitted cardi 
gan. It is worked in simple stocking- 
stitch, with snug-fitting sleeves in rib. 

Materials: 7 ozs. 3-ply wool, in hyaainth 
blue, i oz. yellow, ^ oz. nigger brown, 6 
yards royal blue, 20 yards white, 24 yards 
red, 24 yards flesh, 24 yards snuff brown 
and 2 yards green; one pair each of Nos. 
10 and 12 knitting needles; 10 buttons. 

Measurements: Length, 19 ins.; to fit a 
34-inch bust; sleeve seam, 18 ins. 

Tension: 7 sts. and 9 rows to 1 in. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st., 
stitch; beg., begin; alt., alternate; cont., 
-continue; rep., repeat; inc., increase; dec., 
decrease; st.-st., stocking-stitch; rem., re 
main; Hb, Hyacinth blue; Y., yellow; Roy., 
Royal blue; W., white; R., red; F., flesh; 
N., nigger brown; G., green; and Sb, snuff 
brown. 

The Back. 

With No. 12 needles and Hb. wool, cast 
on 112 sts. Work in k. 1, p. 1 rib for 36 
rows. Change to No. 10 needles, and cont. 
in rib, inc. 1 st. each end of next row and 
every following 6th row until 130 sts. 
Cont. until back measures 12 ins. Shape 
Armholes: Cast off 6 sts. beg. of next 2 
rows. Dec. each end of needle on every 
row until 100 sts. remain. Cont. in rib 
until armholes measure 6^ ins. in depth. 
Shape Shoulders: Cast off 8 sts. beg. of 
next 8 rows. Cast off. 

The Sleeves. 

With No. 12 needles and Hb. wool, cast 
on 60 sts. Work 3 ins. in k; 1, p. 1 rib. 
Change to No. 10 needles. Inc. 1 st. each 
end of every following 6th row until there 
are 104 sts. Cont. until sleeve measures 

18 ins. Shape top. Cast off 6 sts. at 
beg. of next 2 rows. Dec. 1 st. beg. of 
every row, until 44 rem., then 1 st. each 
end of every row until 26 sts. rem. Cast off. 

The Right Front. 

With No. 12 needles and Hb. wool, cast 
on 82 sts. Work in k. 1, p. 1 rib for 3 rows. 

Next row: * Rib 5, cast off 3, rib to end. 
Following row: Rib to cast off sts., cast on 
3, rib 5. Rib 12 rows. Rep. from * once 
more. Make another buttonhole in next 2 
rows. Slip first 14 sts. to a spare needle. 
Change to No. 10 needles. Join in N. wool 
and work 8 rows st.-st. 9th row: K. 24 N 
6 Y., 8 N., 6 Y., 24 N. 10th row: P. 24 N, 
6 Y., 8 N., 6 Y., 24 N. llth row: K. 24 N., 

1 Y., 2 N., 4 W., 6 N., 4 W., 2 N., 1 Y., 24 
N. 12th row: P. 23 N., 22 Roy., 23 N. 
13th row: K. 19 N., 5 Roy., 20 Y., 5 Roy., 

19 N. 14th row: P. 18 N., 2 R., 5 Y., 18 R 
5 Y., 2 Roy., 18 N. 15th row: K. 16 N., 
3 Roy., 2 Y., 5 R., 16 Y., 5 R., 2 Y., 3 R., 
16 N. 16th row: P. 16 N., 4 Y., 2 R., 24 Y., 

2 R., 4 Y., 16 N. 17th row: K. 16 N.. 5 R 
26 Y., 5 R., 16 N. 18th row: P. 17 N, 34 
Y., 17 N. 19th row: K. 17 N., 34 Y., 17 N. 
20th and 21st rows: Rep. 18th and 19th 
rows. 

22nd row: P. 18 Hb., 32 Y., 18 Hb. 
23rd row: K. 18 Hb., 32 Y., 18 Hb. 
24th row: P. 18 Hb., 32 Y., 18 Hb. 
25th row: K. 19 Hb., 30 Y., 19 Hb. 
26th row: P. 20 Hb., 28 Y., 20 lib. 
27th row: K. 20 Hb., 28 Y., 20 Hb. 
28th row: P. 20 Hb., 28 Y., 20 Hb 
29th row: ft. 21 Hb., 26 Y., 21 Hb. 
30th row: P. 21 Hb., 26 Y., 21 Hb 
31st row: K 21 Hb., 26 Y., 21 Hb. 



go round and 
32nd row: 
33rd row: 
34th row: 
35th row: 
36th row: 
37th row: 
38th row: 
39th row: 
40th row: 
Hb. 


round. 

P. 22 Hb., 
K. 23 Hb., 
P. 24 Hb., 
K. 25 Hb., 
P. 26 Hb., 
K. 27 Hb., 
P. 28 Hb., 
K. 29 Hb., 
P. 25 Hb., 


24 
22 
20 
18 
16 
14 
12 
10 
5 F 


Y., 

Y., 
Y., 
Y., 
Y., 
Y., 
Y., 
Y., 
., 8 


22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
Y., 


Hb. 
Hb. 
Hb. 
Hb. 
Hb. 
Hb. 
Hb. 
Hb. 
5 F., 25 



41st row: K. 24 Hb., 4 F., 3 Hb., 6 R., 

3 Hb., 4 F., 24 Hb. 42nd row: P. 23 Hb., 

4 F., 4 Hb., 6 R., 4 Hb., 4 F., 23 Hb. 43rd 
row: K. 22 Hb., 4 F., 5 Hb., 6 R., 5 Hb., 
4 F., 22 Hb. 44th row: P. 22 Hb., 3 F., 



6 Hb., 6 R., 6 Hb., 3 F., 22 Hb. 45th row: 
K. 22 Hb., 4 F., 5 Hb., 6 R., 5 Hb., 4 F., 
22 Hb. 46th row: P. 23 Hb., 4 F., 2 Hb., 
10 R., 2 Hb., 4 F., 23 Hb. 47th row: K. 24 
Hb., 4 F., 12 R., 4 F., 24 Hb. 48th row: 
P. 25 Hb., 2 F., 14 R., 2 F., 25 Hb. 49th 
row: K. 26 Hb., 16 R., 26 Hb. 50th row: 
P. 27 Hb., 14 R., 27 Hb. 51st row: K. 28 
Hb., 12 R., 28 Hb. 52nd row: P. 29 Hb., 
10 R., 20 Hb. 53rd row: K. 30 Hb., 2 R., 
4 F., 2 R., 30 Hb. 54th row: P. 31 Hb, 6 
F., 31 Hb. 55th row: K. 32 Hb., 4 F., 32 
Hb. 56th row: P. 32 Hb., 4 F., 32 Hb. 57th 
row: K. 31 Hb., 6 N., 31 Hb. 58th row: 
P. 31 Hb., 6 N., 31 Hb. 59th row: K. 29 
Hb., 10 W., 29 Hb. 60th sow; P, 28 Hb,, 
12 W., 2 Hb. 61st row: K. 28 Hb., l" W., 
1 Hb., 8 W., 1 Hb., 1 W., 28 Hb. 62nd row: 
P. 31 Hb., 6 W., 31 Hb. 63rd row: K. 31 
Hb., 6 W., 31 Hb. 64th row: P. 32 Hb., 

[Turn to page 45.] 




44 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



HOLD 
YOUR 



Rupture 



SECURELY! 



Use a Roussel Appliance for 14 Days Free. It is Light, Hygienic, Safe and 
Comfortable, No hard Pads to gouge painfully into the flesh, no stiff 
punishing springs, no metal girdle to rust, no buckles to stick, no unhygienic 
Understrnps, and is adjustable in a few seconds. Doctors everywhere re 
commend the Roussel. Thousands 



One leading Doctor says : 
/ order your appliance* 
for my patients because I consider them pre 
ferable to any other type." 
Mr. W. A. faascord, 26 Albemarle Avenue, 
Rose Bay, N.S.W., says : " The hernia I 
had for four years has entirety disappeared, 
and I fully believe the credit is due to your 
appliance." 




of users say it definitely holds 

the Rupture at work and sport, and many 
state it has done away entirely with the Rupture. 
Call or send Stamp for details, Self-measurement 
Form, and 14 Days Trial Offer. There s no obliga 
tion. No matter where you live, we guarantee 
absolute satisfaction or refund your money. 
ADDRESS: THE ROUSSEL APPLIANCE CO., 
DEPT. 29, 9 MARTIN PLACE, SYDNEY. 



MuefciMUCHmore 
Relief for Children s 
COUGHS and COLDS 




Because., 




It works both 
INSIDE and 
OUTSIDE... for 
hours and hours! 



YOUR LITTLE ONE gets instant comfort when VapoRub 
is rubbed on the chest, throat and back at bedtime. 
Then, minute by minute, relief grows stronger, and 
Baby feels better and better, because . . . 



OUTside, on 

the body surface, 
VapoRub warms 
and stimulates like .Z^/ 
a soothing poultice, easing 
tightness and "drawing 
out" painful congestion. 
And at the same time . . . 




INside, with 

every breath, 

VapoRub s sooth 

ing medicinal va- 

pours are carried direct to 

every sore nook and cranny 

of the troubled breathing 

passages. 




Coughing soon stops... breathing becomes cool and 
clear . . . tightness and soreness are warmed away. . . 
often, by morning, the worst of the cold is over and 
Baby feels much better. 



If Your Toothbrush 

Warns of Bleeding 

Gums Look Out! 

ITou May Have 

PYORRHEA 




4 Out of 5. 

Regardless of Age . . . 
May Have it ! 

Dreaded Pyorrhea the natural 
enemy of beautiful teeth and 
firm, healthy gums is no re 
specter of persons. Actually, 4 
out of 5 may get it. 

Neglect of Pyorrhea may lead 
to soft, spongy gums ... to 
loosening teeth which must be 
pulled. So why take chances? 
See your dentist. Then, at home, 
massage your gums and brush 
your teeth twice daily with 
Forhan s Toothpaste the only 
toothpaste containing R. J. 
Forhan s, D.D.S., special anli- 
pyorrhea astringent. 

Recent clinical tests have shown 
that 95% of Pyorrhea-threatened 
cases improved after 30 days of 
using Forhan s. 

Start taking better care of 
your teeth and gums. Get a tube 
of Forhan s to-day! Prices: 
1/10; extra large tube, 2/9. 

"Brush your teeth with it" 

Forhan s 

F2 does two jobs 



Cleans teeth 
saves gums 




"Forhan s is the only den 
tifrice containing special 
anti-pyorrhea astringent" 

Australasian Agents: 
The Sheldon Drug Co. Pty. Ltd., Sydney. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



45 



Our Little Dutch Mill Cardigan 

[From page 43."] 

4 W., 32 Hb. 65th, 66th and 67th rows: 
In Hb. 68th row: P. 47 Hb., 11 W., 10 
Hb. 69th row: K. 18 Hb., 3 W., 47 Hb. 
70th row: P. in Hb. 71st row: K. 12 Hb., 
7 Sb., 49 Hb. 72nd, 73rd and 74th rows: 
In Hb. 75th row: K. 15 Hb., 3 Sb., 50 Hb. 
76th row: P. in Hb. 77th row: K. 6 Hb., 4 
W., 58 Hb. 78th row: P. 53 Hb., 4 Sb., 11 
Hb. 79th row: K. in Hb. 

Shape Armhole. 80th row: Cast off 8 
(1 st. on needle), then p. 36 Hb., 3 W., 20 
Hb. 81st row: K. 11 Hb., 7 Sb., 40 Hb., 
k. 2 tog. 82nd, 83rd and 84th rows: In 
Hb., dec. at armhole edge. 85th row: K. 
10 Hb., 9 Sb., 35 Hb., dec. 86th row: PC. 2 
tog., 34 Hb., 9 Sb., 10 Hb. 87th row: K. 6 
Hb., 2 W., 44 Hb., dec. 88th row: P. 2 
tog., p. in Hb. to end. 89th row: K. 10 G., 
9 Sb., 31 G., dec. 90th row: P. 10 G., 22 
Hb., 9 Sb., 10 Hb. 91st row: K. 10 Hb., 

9 Sb., 32 Hb. 92nd row: P. 32 Hb., 9 Sb., 

10 Hb. 93rd row: K. 11 Hb., 7 Sb., 33 Hb. 
94th row: P. 28 Hb., 1 W., 4 Hb., 7 Sb., 4 
Hb., 1 W., 6 Hb. 95th row: K. 5 Hb., 3 
W., 3 Hb., 7 Sb., 3 Hb., 3 W., 27 Hb. 96th 
row: P. 28 Hb., 3 W., 2 Hb., 7 Sb., 2 Hb., 
3 W., 6 Hb. 97th row: K. 7 Hb., 3 W., 1 
Hb., 7 Sb., 1 Hb., 3 W., 29 Hb. 98th row: 
P. 30 Hb., 3 W., 7 Sb., 3 W., 8 Hb. 99th 
row: K. 9 Hb., 3 W., 5 Sb., 3 W., 31 Hb. 
100th row: P. 32 Hb., 3 W., 3 Sb., 3 W., 
10 Hb. 101st row: K. 11 Hb., 3 W., 1 Sb., 
3 W., 33 Hb. 102nd row: P. 33 Hb., 3 W., 

1 Sb., 2 W., 12 Hb. 103rd row: K. 12 Hb., 

2 Sb., 1 W., 2 Sb., 34 Hb. 104th row: P. 
34 Hb., 2 W., 1 Sb. 2 W., 12 Hb. 105th 
row: K. 11 Hb., 3 W., 1 Sb., 3 W., 33 Hb. 
106th row: P. 32 Hb., 3 W., 3 Sb., 3 W., 10 
Hb. 107th row: K. 9 Hb., 3 W., 5 Sb., 3 
W., 31 Hb. 108th row: P. 30 Hb., 3 W., 
2 Hb., 3 Sb., 2 Hb., 3 W., 8 Hb. 109th row: 
K. 7 Hb., 3 W., 9 Hb., 3 W., 29 Hb. 110th 
row: P. 28 Hb., 3 W., 11 Hb., 3 W., 6 Hb. 
lllth row: K. 5 Hb., 3 W., 13 Hb., 3 W., 
27 Hb. 112th row: P. 28 Hb., 1 W., 15 
Hb., 1 W., 6 Hb. 113th row: K. 22 Hb., 

1 W., 28 Hb. Cont. in st.-st. in Hb. for 9 
rows, finishing at front edge. 

Shape Neck: Cast off 6, work to end. 
Dec. at neck edge in every row until 32 
sts. rem. Cont. for 3 rows. 

Shape Shoulder: * Cast off 8 sts. at arm- 
hole edge 4 times. Slip border sts. on to a 
No. 12 needle, join Hb. wool and work 
border in rib, making a buttonhole in 
every 17th and 18th rows until there are 
10. Work until border is exact length of 
front. Cast off. Oversew to front. 
The Left Front. 

With No. 12 needles and Hb. wool, cast 
on 82 sts. Work 36 rows in rib. Change to 
No. 10 needles and N. wool and k. to last 
14 sts. Slip these on to a safety-pin for 
border. P. back. Work 6 rows in st.-st. 
Proceed exactly as for Right front up to 
and including 67th row. Cont. from 68th 
to 80th rows of Eight front, BUT reading 
rows backwards as follows: 

68th row: P. 10 Hb., 11 W., 47 Hb. When 
80th row is completed, cont. as follows: 
Shape Armhole. 81st row: Cast off 8 sts. 
(1 st. on needle), k. 42 Hb., 7 Sb., 10 Hb. 
82nd, 83rd and 84th rows: Work in Hb., 
dec. at armhole in every row. 85th row: 
K. 2 tog., then 36 Hb.,. 9 Sb., 10 Hb. 86th 
row: P. 10 Hb., 9 Sb., 35 Hb., dec. 87th 
row: K. 2 tog. (1 st. on needle), k. 45 Hb., 

2 W., 6 Hb. 88th row: P. in Hb. to last 2 
sts., dec. 89th row: K. 2 tog. (1 st. on 
needle), 32 G., 9 Sb., 10 G. 90th row: P. 
10 Hb., 9 Sb., 22 Hb., 9 G., p. 2 tog. 91st 
row: K. 32*Hb., 9 Sb., 10 Hb. 92nd row: 



P. 10 Hb., 9 Sb., 32 Hb. 93rd row: K. 33 
Hb., 7 Sb., 11 Hb. 94th row: P. 6 Hb., 1 
W., 4 Hb., 7 Sb., 4 Hb., 1 W., 28 Hb. 95th 
row: K. 27 Hb., 3 W., 3 Hb., 7 Sb., 3 Hb., 
3 W., 5 Hb. 96th row: P. 6 Hb., 3 W., 2 
Hb., 7 Sb., 2 Hb., 3 W., 28 Hb. 97th row: 
K. 29 Hb., 3 W., 1 Hb., 7 Sb., 1 Hb., 3 W., 
7 Hb. 98th row: P. 8 Hb., 3 W., 7 Sb., 
3 W., 30 Hb. 99th row: K. 31 Hb., 3 W., 
5 Sb., 3 W., 9 Hb. 100th row: P. 10 Hb., 
3 W., 3 Sb., 3 W., 32 Hb. 101st row: K. 33 
Hb., 3 W., 1 Sb., 3 W., 11 Hb. 102nd row: 
P. 12 Hb., 2 W., 1 Sb., 3 W., 33 Hb. 103rd 
row: K. 34 Hb., 2 Sb., 1 W., 2 Sb., 12 Hb. 
104th row: P. 12 Hb., 2 W., 1 Sb., 2 W., 
34 Hb. 105th row: K. 33 Hb., 3 W., 1 Sb., 
3 W., 11 Hb. 106th row: P. 10 Hb., 3 W., 
3 Sb., 3 W., 32 Hb. 107th row: K. 31 Hb., 
3 W., 5 Sb., 3 W., 9 Hb. 108th row: P. 8 
Hb., 3 W., 2 Hb., 3 Sb., 2 Hb., 3 W., 30 Hb. 
109th row: K. 29 Hb., 3 W., 9 Hb., 3 W., 
7 Hb. 110th row: P. 6 Hb., 3 W., 11 Hb., 
3 W., 28 Hb. lllth row: K. 27 Hb., 3 W., 
13 Hb., 3 W., 5 Hb. 112th row: P. 6 Hb., 
1 W., 15 Hb., 1 W., 28 lib. 113th row: 
K. 28 Hb., 1 W., 22 Hb. Break off W. 
wool. Cont. in st.-st. in Hb. for 8 rows, 
finishing at front edge. Now finish as for 
Eight front. Slip border sts. on to a No. 
12 needle and work in rib until it is exact 
length of front. 

The Neck Band. 

Using No. 12 needles and Hb. wool, cast 
on 115 sts. for 10 rows, making a button 
hole on the 4th row. Cast off. Sew to 
neck. Sew up seams. Sew on buttons. 



Modish Large Collars. 

For the coming winter days large collars 
will be greatly in vogue. On coats, com 
bined with all the latest fashion points, 
they certainly add to distinction, and are 
very comfortable and warm. Another asset 
is that the large heavy collar style helps 
to accentuate the smaller waist, which is 
such a help with a heavy coat. 




Sketches A, B and C show how well 
over the shoulder line the collar comes. 
C gives an idea of the large collar and 
revere style. Some of the loose coats 
also have large style collars, but they cer 
tainly suit the nipped-in waist effect. 



Pocket Features. 

Have you noticed how important pockets 
are on the new season s frocks, coats and 
suits? They certainly are popular and 
very novel. Note the sketches: 




A: The one-sided double pocket for a 
frock. B: The one-sided slit pocket, em 
broidered for frock. C: The double tab 
style for coat or suit. D: The pocket in 
seams, with buttons each side. E: The 
three-tab style, each tab buttoned. F: 
The pocket with tab from belt fastened 
over pocket. 



Old gossips are the worst of all gossips. 
Scandal is the press agent of old age. 



"Key Money" Scandal. 

In England there are bitter complaints 
about monies being paid for key money, 
and here is a letter on the subject: 

"A friend of mine inquiring after a flat 
at Streatham was told it would cost 
1,000 300 key money and the rest for 
indifferent furniture in the flat. Naturally 
my friend did not take the flat. The second 
case was of another friend at Surbiton 
who, after a five-year search, signed up to 
lease a flat. Shortly before he was to take 
possession he was asked for 50 key 
money. In desperation he paid. I know 
the victims of this kind of thing are 
usually reluctant to give information to 
authorities, but it does seem to me to be 
tragic that some step cannot be taken to 
stamp out this scandal." 

These key money pirates are polite and 
gentlemanly compared with the under 
ground harpies in Australia who wax fat 
because of the great shortage of home 
accommodation. The few cases that have 
been exposed through the Courts are mild 
compared with those not publicized. When 
folks are desperate they will pay anything 
for a home, and the key brokers, and flat 
tenants who wish to quit, take the fullest 
advantage of necessitous prospects. In one 
case brought to our knowledge a flat occu 
pant asked the landlord s approval of the 
transfer of his tenancy. He was being paid 
400 for the key! 

The only effective way to eradicate this 
form of blackmail is to impose a stiff gaol 
penalty with no fine option. 



Men are great, only as they are kind. 



46 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



Cearn 




Vressmaking, 

Know the joy of cutting and making perfect 
fitting clothes. In quite a short time we can 
teach you thoroughly. 

DAY, EVENING AND 
POSTAL LESSONS 
IN DRESSCUTTING, 
DESIGNING, MAKING 

Be sure of the best tuition. Our schools are 
known for our successful students and our 
methods endorsed by leading fashion houses. 

CALL, WRITE OR PHONE 
FOR FREE BOOKLET 

I MAIL COUPON TO NEAREST BRANCH 1 

I McCabe Academy, I 

I Please send me, without obligation, your free i 
Booklet about Dressmaking lessons for which I I 



| enclose 2 id. stamp. 

I 
Name 

Address 

Personal or Postal Tuition. 



LL 



McCABE ACADEMY of DRESSMAKING 

THE FOREMOST AND LARGEST SCHOOL OF FASHION. 
Sydney: Canberra House, 295 Elizabeth St. Box 2424. 

Melbourne: Manchester Unity Bldgs., Swanston and Collins Sts. Box 330C. 
Brisbane: Penny s Buildings. Adelaide St. Entrance. Box I8I6W, G.P.O. 
Perth: National House. William St. Box 482. 
Adelaide: Shell House. North Terrace. Box 5I9E. 
South Africa: Shakespeare House. Commission St.. Johannesburg. P.O Box 5811. 



SWOLLEN 
GLANDS 

SORE THROAT I 



TN simple cases of sore throat 
and swollen glands, early 
treatment with IODEX will 
reduce the inflammation and 
swelling, relieve the pain, and 
help to prevent more serious 
developments. 

In case of persistent glandular 
swelling, consult your Doctor. It 
rnay be serious. 





Where the >kin is not broken and 
there is much pain, yon ihould u 
Green Label lodex a combinatioa 
of Todex with Methyl Salicylatc, 
" which possesses quite remarkable pain- 
relieving properties. 



ODEY 

NO-STAIN IODINE ^m. 



At all Chemists 




BABY 
WILL 
THRIVE 




In the early stages, the ideal 
alternative to natural feeding 
is Robinson s Patent Barley 
with cow s milk Then, at 
weaning time, give baby 
Robinson s Patent Groats, a 
creamy-smooth cereal that is 
very nourishing and easy for 
baby to digest 

ROBINSON S 



ROBINSONS 

i PARLEY:, 



ROBINSONS] 
GROATS .CROATS 




Ke&effam, 
*tteadacJte& 



BAYER S 

AS PI R | N 

TABLETS 

24 for 1,3... JOO for 4/- 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



47 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[TURNINGS MUST BE ALLOWED FOR ON ALL PATTERNS] 



FROCK, 7337. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Bodice Front and Back. If padded 
shoulders are not needed, shorten shoulder 
seams by cutting off inch *#$%**. 

at armhole end and shape 
a new armhole curve off to 
nothing about halfway 
down armhole, as shown on 
cutting guide. Cut off 
inch at armhole end of 
shoulder seam on 
both front and back 
and taper seam line V 

to nothing at neck J|| 
end. |? 

Sleeve. For the Jf 
three - quarter jl|| 
sleeve fold under 
in a straight line / : 
from notch to ; 
notch. 

Skirt. Mark off :: 7 



7337 



TIE 






BACK 
SKIRT 



GATHER 



2 inches below 
waistline of 
pattern sup 
plied, pin pat 
tern to paper 
and cut around 
the entire outer 
edge. 

O Strap and 
Tie. Cut a strap 
1 inches wide 
> and use vest as 
a guide for 
70 cutting the 
length. Then a 
T~ straight piece 
2\ inches wide 
and 45 inches 
long for the 
tie and bow. 

Step 2. Test 
ing for Correct 
Size: As this 
pattern has 
been cut for 
the average 36- 
inch figure it 
will be necessary to see whether alterations 
are needed for the individual figure. Pin 
pieces together, remembering that seam 
and hem allowances are not included. Place 
pattern over figure and observe fitting. If 




bodice front and back are too long, shorten 
by folding between armhole and waistline, 
and, if too short, cut in sa,me place and 
insert sufficient paper to provide additional 
length required. 

To increase pattern, pin additional strips 
of paper along seam edges where extra 
width is required, and, to decrease pattern, 
trim away pattern edges where additional 
width is not needed. Remove pattern from 
figure, take apart, press flat, then even up 
all seam edges. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Pin pattern 
to material as shown in cutting guide. 
Cut out with allowances of 2 inches for 
skirt hem, 1 inch on underarm seams 
and ^ inch on all other edges. Before 
removing pattern from material, mark 
clearly with tailors chalk or tacking 
exact seam lines, notches and punch- 
holes. 

Step 4. Bodice: Pin darts in front 
and back on the inside and machine 
from lower edge, tapering stitching 
gradually to nothing. Tie threads and 
press with darts extending towards 
sides. Tuck material for vest, pin pat 
tern in place and cut out with \ inch 
seam allowance on all raw edges. Pin 
right side of strap to the inside of 
vest on the right-hand side, machine 
in place, commencing at centre front, 
and continue across top to outer 
edge, then down front. 

Cut away excess seam allowance 
to within | inch of stitching. Turn 
strap to outside, press, turn under 
raw edge, press again and machine 
in place. Finish left side with the 
other strap, but in this instance 
apply on the outside, turn and secure 
by machine on the inside. Lap the 
right-hand side over left with centre 
front lines exactly over each other 
I and tack in place. 

Clip around curved neck edge of 

bodice front every \ inch, turn under 

allowance, pin over vest with marked 

seam lines over each other and tack 

in place. Machine as close as possible to 

seam- edge, press, join back to front at 

shoulders in .plain seams, press open and 

neaten. 

Step 5. Skirt: Lengthen machine stitch 
a trifle and along upper edge of skirt, 
machine on marked seam line, then on 
seam allowance \ inch from the first stitch 
ing, commencing 5 inches from centre front 
and centre back on one side and continu 
ing across waistline to a point 5 inches 
beyond centre front and centre back on 
the other side. Draw up both threads to 
fit lower edge of bodice front and back, 
tie threads and arrange fulness evenly. 
Turn under seam allowance along lower 
edge of bodice, pin over skirt front and 
back. Tack, machine as close as possible 
to seam edge, press and neaten. 

Step 6. Side Seams and Opening: Pin 
frwit and back together at sides and leave 
an opening 3 inches above and 4 inches 
below waistline on left side. Try on, let 
out or take in allowance if necessary. 
Remove, machine seams, press and neaten. 
Attach a zipper to side opening or cut two 
facing strips of self-material 1J inches 
wide and 1 inch longer than opening, with 
one edge along selvedge. Pin strips to 
front and back edges of opening with raw 
edges together and right sides of material 
facing. 



Machine \ inch from edges, press seams 
open and fold strips under so that selv 
edges are exactly under seam lines. Tack 
in place, machine \ inch from edge, press 
front or upper-side under on seam line, 
but allow back to extend under front. Tie- 
stitch strips together at top and bottom. 
Sew a hook and bar to waistline and snap 
fasteners above and below. 

Step 7-. Sleeves: Join at underarms in 
plain seams, press open .and neaten. Cut 
self-material bias facing strips 2 inches 
wide for lower edges. Pin to sleeves with 
right sides together, machine, cut away 
excess seam allowance, turn facing to 
inside, press, turn under raw edge, machine 
through fold only and slip-stitch in place. 
Pin sleeves to armholes with notches meet 
ing and ease evenly across tops. 

Step 8. Sleeve Pads: Cut a pattern for 
sleeve pads from a circle 10 inches in 
diameter. Fold in halves and cut off 
rounded ends each side to form a triangle. 
Provide a piece of cotton wool same size 
as each triangle, but omit seam allowance. 
Open out triangle (now a diamond shap_e) 
and tack cotton wool to one side. Draw 
padding away from outside edge, tapering 
it to nothing ;md keeping it thickest across 
the centre. Turn under raw edges, fold 
in halves and oversew edges together. 

Pin- pads to frock with centre in line 
with shoulder seams, point towards 
neckline and extend f inch beyend 
armhole seam into sleeve. Try on and 
note whether shoulder width is becoming 
and sleeves correctly set in. Alter if 
necessary, unpin pads, machine sleeves, 
trim allowance to within f inch of stitch 
ing, overcast raw edges, replace pads and 
tie-stitch to seam allowance at shoulders. 

Step 9. Bow and Buttons: Pin centre of 
neck tie to centre back of bodice with 
right sides of material together. Tack to 
centre front line on both sides, secure by 
machine. Fold the ends in halves length 
wise, machine from centre front to each 
end. turn right side out and press. Sew 
buttons. to vest and snap fasteners under 
neath. 

Step 10. Finishing: Allow frock to hang 
overnight. Try on and mark a becoming 
length with chalk or pins, measuring up 
an even distance from floor. Turn the 
hem, secure by hand and complete with 
final pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
2^ yards 54 inches wide. Contrast: | yard 
36 inches wide. 

[For 34-inch bust, take ^ inch off side 
seams of front and back. For 38-inch bust, 
allow $ inch on side seams of front and 
back.] 

-" 
FROCK, 7338. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Bodice Back. Fold under in a straight 
line through punchholes and use the folded 
edge for waistline. 

Collar and Facing. Cut a straight piece 
of paper 16 inches long and 5 inches wide 
for the collar. Fold in halves lengthwise, 
then crosswise and cut diagonally across 
the end from the fold to a point 1 inch 
from cut edges, making the neck edge of 
collar 14 inehes long. Mark shape of fac 
ing on bodice pattern as indicated in cut 
ting guide; trace to paper and cut out. 

Skirt. Use pattern supplied for Pattern 
7337 and fold under in a straight line from 
notch at Avaistline to notch at lower edge 
and use the resulting pattern for side 
front and side back. For the skirt trim 
ming, make a pattern from a strip of 

[Turn to page 49.] 



48 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 





or after the ball, 

Into the street from the sheltering hall ; 
Then is the cold catching time for us all, 
The moment of danger be sure. 
Winter mischances our happiness mar, 
Sore throat, bronchitis and nasal catarrh; 
Then for its advent how grateful we are, 
Woods Great Peppermint Cure. 

For Coughs, Colds remember 

Wood* Great Peppermint Cnre 




Tell me, 

vJLf^r V^ 1/fJJL ... If it s catching, how 
am I going to keep it from spreading all through 
the house? In a big hospital, of course, you 
can take all sorts of special precautions, but at 
home . . . 

In fighting infection in your own home, learn from the hospital. 
Modern science provides you with a powerful weapon against the germs 
that cause so many all-too-common infections. In the leading maternity 
hospitals in Australia, and in almost every hospital in the British 
Commonwealth, doctors, surgeons and nurses protect their patients, 
and protect themselves, with Dettol . And Dettol is at your own 
Chemist shop now ! 

Strange as it seems here is a highly efficient germicide, tested and 
proved in literally millions of cases and it is non-poisonous; it does 
not even stain linen. 

Thus, Dettol , so deadly to germs, is kind to you. On the cut or 
scratch that may fester, in the room from which infection may spread, 
on your own hands when you act as nurse, use Dettol , as hospitals do. 




REGD. 



THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC 

RECKITT * COLMAN (AUST.) LTD. (PHARMACEUTICAL DIVISION). S/DNE* 



Joan couldn t do a 
thing with it... 




Her hair, we mean. 
Until she heard 
about the S.R.S. 
hair routine. 



SHAMPOO 

\ with Camilatone 
for deep-down 
cleansing that floats away 
dirt and loose dandruff. 
Makes your hair soft and 
lovely. Price with Tonrlnz 7d. 

RINSE 

with Tonrinz leaves 
no dulling film. Tonrinz puts 
the sunshine in your clean, 
clean hair. A packet is in 
cluded with your Camilatone. 
Extra packets 3^d. 



ith Lustrset the 
tonic fixative that 
makes your lovely hair so 
easy to manage. Keeps it 
healthy and beautiful. Large 
tube 2/-. 

Sold everywhere. 



s no trouble now 




beauty shampoo and Tonrinz 



Puts sunshine in your hair 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



49 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 47.] 

paper 1\ inches long and 4f inches wide. 
Fold in halves, cut from 
folded edge up to a point 
about 2 inches from 
corners, then diagonally 
to upper edge to a point 
inches from centre. 
Shape upper edge to fol 
low skirt waistline. 
Step 2. Testing for Cor 




rect Size: See Step 

2, Pattern 7337. 
Step 3. Cutting 

Material: See Step 

3, Pattern 7337. 
Step 4. Button 
holes: Mark posi 
tion and size for 
buttonholes on 
right-hand side of 
bodice, making 
these a trifle longer 
than size of but 
tons. Cut binding 
strips f inch wide 
and f inch longer 
than size of button 
hole. 

Fold strips in 
halves lengthwise, 
press, tack to garment with raw edges 
meeting exactly over mark and ends ex 
tending an even distance beyond mark. 
Machine along centre of each strip and do 
not take stitching beyond marked line. Tie 
all ends of threads securely on the inside. 
Cut along marked line to within \ inch of 
each end, then diagonally to ends of 
stitching. Turn raw edges of binding 
strips to the inside and press with folded 
edges meeting exactly in centre. On the 
inside pin the triangular piece at each end 
to binding strips, fold garment back out 
of the way and machine across each end 
through all thicknesses. Tie threads and 
press again. 



Step 5. Collar and Facing: Join front to 
back at shoulders in plain seams, press 
open and neateri. Pin neck edge of collar 
to the outside of bodice neck edge. Tack, 
machine; do not take the stitching beyond 
seam allowance at ends. Clip seam allow 
ance across fronts and press seam open on 
fronts only. Join neck edge of facings to 
the other side of collar in same way. Clip 
allowance and press. Pin facing to bodice 
with right sides together, machine across 
ends of collar and down fronts. 

Cut away excess seam allowance, turn 
facings to inside, press, turn under raw 
edge of facing, machine through fold only, 
tack in place down front. Turn under raw 
edge of collar and hem to previous row of 
stitching across back neckline. Cut open 
ings in facing exactly under each button 
hole, turn under raw edge, machine to 
binding and press again. Lap right-hand 
side over left and tack together at waist 
line. Sew buttons on left side to cor 
respond with buttonholes. If desired, 
attach buttons to trimming as 
illustrated. 

Step 6. Skirt: Join skirt front to 
side fronts and skirt back to side 
backs in plain seams, press open 
and neaten. Pin facings to skirt 
trimmings right sides together, 
machine around outer edge, cut 
away excess seam allowance, turn 
right side out, press, complete but 
tonholes and tack to skirt waist 
line as shown. Turn under allow 
ance on skirt, pin to 

bodice and ease fulness tTv^j 
in front and back to fit pews! 
skirt. Tack, machine, (PI y (I 
press and neaten. pi TO 

Step 7. Side Seams and <| 
Opening: See Step 6, ! JJ 
Pattern 7337. 

Step 8. Sleeves: See i"| 2 
Step 7, Pattern 7337. | 

Step 9. Sleeve Pads: 
See Step 8, Pattern 7337. 

Step 10. Belt: Make 2 WAI <y, 
belt, finish with a buckle 
and apply loops at sides 
to hold it In place. 

Step 11. Finishing: 
See Step 10, Pattern 
7337. 

Pattern is for 36-inch 
bust. Material: 2| yards 
54 inches wide. 

[For alteration of 
sizes, see description No. 
7337.] 



Step 2. Testing Pattern: See Step 2, 
Pattern 7337. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: See Step 3, 
Pattern 7337. When cutting the back yoke 
allow If inches seam allowance along 
centre back to provide for an overlap of 
inch, and 1^ inches for facing. 

Step 4. Bodice: Join front to back at 
shoulders in plain seams, press open and 
neaten. Cut a self-material fitted facing 
for neck edge 1 inches wide and omit 
portion covered by the facing down centre 
back. Join at shoulders, press open, join 
ends to back facings, press, pin facing to 
bodice with right sides together, machine 
exactly on marked seam, cut away excess 
seam allowance, turn facing to inside, 
press, turn under raw edge, machine 
through fold only and tie-stitch to seam 
allowance at shoulders. Lap right-hand 
side over left with centre back lines 
exactly over each other and tack in place. 

Step 5. Sleeves: Pin darts in sleeves on 
the inside, tack in place, then machine, 
commencing 3 inches from wrist end and 
taper stitching gradu 
ally to nothing. Tie 
threads and press dart 
towards front. Cut 
away excess seam 
allowance to within J 
inch of tacking. 

Turn under raw 
edges . for inch, 
machine through folds 



FROCK, 7339. 

Step 1. Completing Pat- D* <.4lwcHe* - ae INCHES L 
tern: 

Bodice. For the side 
front use pattern given 
for front of Frock 7337 
and mark off from notch at waist 
line, up through punchholes to 
notch at neck edge and through 
punchhole to armhole. For the 
back, mark off from notch at 
centre back through punchholes 
to armhole. 

Sleeve. Mark off upper por 
tion of sleeve from notch at front 
through punchholes to notch at 
back. 

Skirt. This is a straight piece 



PART OF SKIRT 



on both front and 
back. Remove tacking, 
join at underarms in 
plain seams, press open 
and finish lower edge 
with a self -material 
bias strip 1 inch wide 
applied in same way 
as the facing to sleeves 
of Frock 7337. 



PA.RT or SKIRT 




of material cut from two widths of 54-inch 
material and another strip 4J inches wide 
and 26 inches long, or desired length, plus 
the usual seam and hem allowances. 



Step 6. Seams: Pin side fronts to back at 
underarms and machine for a distance of 
2 inches only from armhole downwards 

[Turn to page 50.] 



50 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 49.] 

and press seams open. Pin sleeves to arm- 
holes with notches meeting, tack and 
machine in place. Make a diagonal cut 
right to seam allowance at corners of 
front panels. Pin back and side fronts 
with sleeves attached to front and yoke 
sections in a plain seam and take care to 
keep all seam lines exactly over each 
other. 

Tack, machine carefully. Press with 
seam allowances together extending up 
wards on yoke and towards centre front 
on side fronts; neaten all raw edges. Make 
shoulder pads as described in Step 8, Pat 
tern 7337, and attach with centre in line 
with the shoulder seam. Try on and let 
out or take in allowance down sides if 
necessary. Finish the stitching on side 
seams and leave an opening on left side. 

Step 7. Skirt: Join the three pieces 
together in plain seams, press open and 
pleat the upper edge to fit the lower edge 
of bodice. Arrange for one seam to come 
at the side opening. Apply bodice to skirt 
and finish the opening as suggested in 
Steps 5 and 6, Frock 7337. 

Step 8. Bow: Use spotted material for 
bow, cut on bias; make and apply as 
shown in illustration. 

Step 9. Finishing: Sew buttons down 
back of bodice and snap fasteners under 
neath. If preferred, buttonholes may be 
made. Close wrist openings also with 
snap fasteners. Turn the hem and finish 
as described in Step 10, Frock 7337. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
3 yards 54 inches wide. 

[For alteration to other sizes, see de 
scription No. 7337.] 



[From page 9.~\ 

p. 1 for 3^ inches. Change to No. 10 
needles, purl 1 row, increasing to 84 sts. 
Repeat the pattern rows as given for 
front of pullover, omitting the 11 sts. each 
end of row; that is, commence from * in 
each row. Work 5 rows, then increase 1 
st. at each end of the next and everv fol 




lowing 8th row until there are 106 sts., 
working the new sts. into the pattern as 
they appear. Continue on the 106 sts. until 
sleeve is 18 inches. Cast off 8 sts. at be 
ginning of next two rows; then, keeping 
pattern correct, k. 2 tog. at both ends of 
the needle every 2nd row until there are 
38 sts. Cast off loosely. 

To Make Up. 

Press the edges of shoulders and arm- 
holes. Sew up right shoulder seam and 



1^ inches of left shoulder seam. With No. 
11 needles pick up from right side of work 
the stitches along shoulder front, work 4 
in stocking-st. Cast off. Then sew back 
to form a hem. Work other side of seam 
the same, working 2 rows of stocking-st. 
only. Do not turn this under. Sew in 
sleeves. With a hot iron over a damp 
cloth, press the whole well. Sew up under 
arm and sleeve seams. Using the No. 11 
needles, pick up and knit from right side 
of work all the sts. along side of neck from 
shoulder opening, then the sts. across front 
from the safety pin. Pick up and knit all 
the sts. along other side of neck, then all 
the sts. from the pin across back of neck. 
Work in a ribbing of k. 1, p. 1 for 1 inch 
and cast off loosely ribwise from wrong 
side of work. Sew snap fasteners at 
shoulder. 



Quilted Hot Water Bag Cover. 

An acceptable gift for Mothers Day. 

We have chilly nights and a hot water bag 

is very drab without a cover. Cut a paper 

pattern of the cover shapes. Then cut out 




of material, plain or floral. Cut a wadding 
lining and stitch across to form diamond- 
shape stitching. Bind all edges with bias 
binding and oversew sides together. Sew 
on buttons and make buttonholes on tabs, 
as sketch A. Embroider a flower or initial 
in centre if plain material. 

A novel cover for a kiddie is one that is 
"buttoned up"; as sketch C, and with the 
child s name embroidered on it. Made in 
flannel or felt. Of course, with the hot 
water bag included it would make a doubly 
special gift. 

++> 

Sir Stafford Cripps said at a pliblic meet 
ing recently that he stuck to a statement 
he made at Hull in 1935 that it was essen 
tial to Socialism that the British Empire 
should be liquidated. "That is what we 
have done," he said to a questioner. "We 
have done it in the cases of India, Paki 
stan, Burma and Ceylon." Something to 
be proud of! 

The best way to get evens is to forget. 



Sports Belts and Fobs. 

The modern girls usually wear slacks- 
for shootin , huntin , and fishin ; but they 
also like to look smart with an individual 
ity of their own. To cater for this the 
stores are now selling rather smart and 
novel belts, usually with a fob attached- 




Sketched are a few ideas. A: The sash 
and slotted end of gay contrast. B: One 
of the newest belts, with a leather fob, 
studded with brass and engraved horse s 
head. C: Cummerbund of spotted silk and 
chain fob. C: The "Annie, Get Your Gun" 
belt of thonged and punched leather. E: 
The fob with sailing ship depicted, and F 
with the skis embossed on fob. 



Stars Salaries. 

The absurdly high salaries paid to film 
stars has been the subject of correspond 
ence in the public press of England. 
In America there is also a crusade for a 
substantial reduction in stars salaries. 
There can be little doubt that the conduct 
of some stars has much to do with the 
public resentment. Here is one letter 
that about sums up the general opinion on 
the subject: -- 

"One of the leading film actors is re 
ported as saying: You ve got to keep a 
secretary, a chauffeur, valet and a Eolls- 
Bentley . As one who goes to the films, on 
the rare occasions that there is anything 
worth seeing, I could not care less whether 
the star keeps a Rolls-Bentley or merely 
a small nine-horse like myself. I do, 
however, object to being charged the pre 
sent ridiculously high prices in the larger 
cinemas largely, it would appear, in order 
that actors can attempt to dispense with 
good taste and moderation in their style of 
living. No star is worth 25,000 to 
30,000 a year. Most of them are too 
dear at a Prime Minister s salary. Let us 
have lower salaries and cheaper seats, 
otherwise the cinemas will become half 
empty, because their wares are too dear." 



Pickles should never be made in metal 
utensils. When a pickle needs boiling, it 
should be done in an enamel or fireproof 
earthenware utensil. 



Australian Home Journal, May 2. 1949 



51 




The makers of the famous 
\ ANTI-SHRINK. dress fabric* 




NOW ANNOUNCE . 




furnishing fabrics 



You know what a wonderful difference the Grafton 

process made to dress fabrics. 
Now you can buy a complete range of Grafton 
curtains and loose cover materials too. 

7 hey are FADELESS and guaranteed, oj course. 

All of the linens, glazed chintzes and cretonnes 
in the Grafton range can be washed . . . (and remember 
the glazed chintz has a permanent glazed finish). They 
dry rapidly . . . easy to iron . . . and so they can be 
back on your furniture or windows on the same day. 

In patterns and widths to suit every type ot room 

All leading stores throughout Australia 
arc now opening their first shipments. 

With a sigh a e must admit that, like everything else fr art* 
England, supplies are limited. So see them as soon as you can. 



THE GRAFTON 
FURNISHING RANGE 

Linens 31" and 48 
Cretonnes 31* and 48 
Merriecolor 48 
Brocaded 

rayon-and-cotton 48* 
Permanent Glazed 

Chintz 3T.48 




Gf/6 



Printed by John Sands Pty. Ltd., Druitt St., Sydney, and Published by James Russell, for the Proprietors, at the Australian Horn* 

lournal Offirga. "Horn* lournal" Houaa. 4Q7-4Q9 Kent St.. Sydney. 



52 



Australian Home Journal, May 2, 1949 




ttH, * * 







FAMOUS 





The most pleasant break in every school day is playtime and the school lunch. There s 

a tasty snack then to be enjoyed, so make that snack Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits. 

In buying for your children, be sure you get Arnott s. 

There is no Substitute for Quality 



AUSTRALIA S MAJOR TROUBLES ARE MINER 



U 



A 



I 



HOM JQU RNA 



Registered at 
the 6. P.O., 
Sydney, for 



by pest as a 
newspaper, 





These 
Patterns {" 

T 

Enclosed 1 




AUGUST 1st, 1949 





-m 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 




IN 




_S? CENTURY ENGLAND DEVIL WORSHIPPERS 
WERE CONSULTED TO CURE TOOTHACHE/ 
TO PREVENT TOOTHACHE TODAY, 



VISIT YOUR DENTIST REGULARLY^ 
USE KOLYNOS TWICE A " 

KOLYNOS KEEPS YOUR 
TEETH SPARK1ING- 
YOUR BREATH ^ 
FRAGRANT/ 




l7S 



^ 



/ 



PfNICIUIN 

tOLLIES 

LOZ6N6E5 OF PENICILLIN 
ARE NOW BEING MADE . 
FOR DENTAL DISEASES/ 




_ SCIENTISTS SAY WE SMELL _ _ 

AND FEEL FLAVOUR AS WELL AS TASTE IT/ THAT 
COOL, REFRESHING KOLYNOS FLAVOUR LASTS LONG;; 
AFTER YOU HAVE CLEANED YOUR TEETH. 

THE"FEEL" OF IT9$&P b QfcuaCh o 



^//V(?5 BAP we* 




IT WAS OMCE THOUGHT 
TO KWSE THE MOUTH W/TH 
AN UN6VN NUMBER OF 

MOUTHFUL LS OF WATt 
M MNSE YOf/A MOUTH Wt 
fj ANT/$Pr/C KOLYMOS - 
"rl KOLYA/OS FRESHENS YOUR. 
, I BRfATH AS /T PKES 
I o ^ A/ *P f>OUSHS & 

YOUR TEETH 




KOLYNOS 5AVE5 YOU MONEY EVERY 
TIME YOU CLEAN YOUR TEETH - 6ECAU56 
IT 5 CONCENTRATED. /T GOES TWC6 AS 
FAR A5 ORDINARY TOOTHPASTE 
REMEMBER HALF-AN-fNCH ON 
DRY BRUSH 16 PLENTY / 



O O 

V 



Oo 





Neuralgia? 

They work quickly and safely because, in them, pure 
Aspirin is balanced with Phenacetin, Caffeine and 
Quinine, the products known to for.if\ and sustain t!ie 
effects of Aspirin whilst eliminating undesirable after 
effect*. 



Take a couple of 



ANACIN 

Tablets instead 




For Safe, Quick relief. 



Australian Home Journal, August I, 1949 




Esther Williams models a pink chiffon 
evening gown which features a wide 
scarf that drapes to form innumerable 
neck lines. The full skirt has a wide 
band, which can be discarded and worn 
as a bare midriff gown with a matching 
bra. A diamond clip, bracelet and ear 
rings lend the only bit of decoration to 
the gown. 

Charity. 

The wiles of the charity organisers are 
many. One is to send a book of lottery 
tickets (24, for which you pay 1) by 
registered post, generally to folks whose 
names are on the telephone list. The assump 
tion is that people who have a phone are 
better off than those who have not. You 
are not bound to either dispose of these or 
return them to the sender. Another trick 
is to ring up at dinner time a number of 
selected contacts, and remind them that 
the so-and-so art union closes in a few days 
and suggesting the purchase of some 
tickets. 

* 



SUMMER CATALOGUE 

READY AUGUST 9th 

The "Australian Home Journal" Cata 
logue of Spring and Summer Fashions will 
be ready on August 9th. It covers 40 
pages of all that is latest and best in 
fashion designs for the new season. The 
illustrations are printed in high-class col 
our effect. Our readers will be pleased 
with this publication, which depicts artisti 
cally the latest designs for the Spring and 
Rummer Season. All departments of 
dressmaking are catered for; frocks of all 
kinds for adults and children, frocks for 

ifferent occasions, and frocks for the 
matron. Sports wear, blouses, and undies 
have been very carefully selected. Child 
ren s fashions girls and boys are allotted 
a section to themselves. Price: Is 4d 
(postal note I/- an d 4d. in stamps). 

Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent 
Mreet, Sydney. 





Blush-Cleanse your skin 

Lady Dudley, one of the loveliest of England s younger 
peeresses, with the fairest of hair and hazel eyes, says: 
"I really enjoy caring for my face the new "Blush- 
Cleanse" way with Pond s Cold Cream. It makes 
my skin feel so wonderfully soft and fresh . . . gives 
it a clean, glowing look." 

HOW TO "BLUSH-CLEANSE" 

1. Rouse your face with warm water. Dip deep into Pond s 
Cold Cream and swirl it in soft, creamy circles up over your 
face and throat. Tissue off. 

2. Blush-rinse. Cream again with snowy soft Pond s Cold Cream. 
Swirl about 25 more creamy circles over your face. Tissue well. 

3. Tingle your face with a splash of 
cold water. Blot dry. 

RESULT: The freshest, softest face that 
ever looked back at you from your mirror ! 
So every night this complete Pond s 
"Blush-cleansing" . . . Every morning 
for a bright awake look a once-over 
"Blush-cleansing" with 

Pond s Cold Cream 

PC 9-5 





Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



Qrrvotts 





Dear Sirs, I am forward 
ing you a photograph of 
my little boy, Robert, 
aged 2 years 10 months. 
He was reared onArnott s 
famous Milk Arrowroot 
Biscuits. They were the 
first step he took on solid 
food and are still in 
cluded in his diet to-day. 
Robert weighs 2 stone. 
(Signed) Mrs. A. Irvine. 



ROBERT LEE IRVINE 

of 57 Oakland Ave., The Entrance, N.S.W. 



FAMOUS 



Ml Jf ARROWROOT 



B I SG U I TS 



There is no Substitute for Quality 





USE IODEX FOR: Stiff and Swollen 
Joints, Sprains and Bruises, Swollen 
Glands, Rheumatic Twinges, Neuralgia 
Pains, Chest Congestion, Muscular Cramp, 
Stiff Neck, Synovitis, Neuritis, Lumbago. 



End nagging muscular 
pains now. Rub in 
IODEX iodine ointment 
rub out the pain. 
IODEX possesses nearly 
twice the strength of tinc 
ture of iodine but does 
not stain, blister or 
harden the skin. IODEX 
is excellent First Aid, but 
in stubborn cases see your 
Doctor. 

-A- Where skin U not broken 
and there is much pain, use 
Green Label lodex a com 
bination of lodex with 
Methyl Salicy ate, which 
possesses quite remarkable 
pain-relieving properties. 




Heart to Heart 



Bridesmaids? 

"I am to be married in a couple of 
months time, and am in a quandary about 
my bridesmaids. My sister expects to be 
one, and I am not too friendly with her; 
also I have two girl friends who wish to be 
bridesmaids. I really only want to have 
two bridesmaids, as I think three would be 
a crowd. What would you do?" Judith. 

Yours is an easy problem. Have the 

three bridesmaids, your sister to be the 
principal one, and this will not cause 
jealousy with the two girl friends, one of 
whom, otherwise, would have to be the 
head one. Also it may make a great 
difference between you and your sister in 
your future relations. She will always re 
member you chose her for first place. In 
your married life you will appreciate any 
kindness and attention from your sister. 
She will be delighted to be chief brides 
maid, and from your point of view it will 
be a happy solution of the difficulty, and 
very tactful! 

She is Worried: 

"A year or so ago I had rather a dreadful 
experience, when I found on my wedding 
day that the man I was about to wed was 
already married. Later on he was arrested 
on some fraud charge and put in gaol. Now 
I have become fond of another man who is 
some years my senior. He is very devoted 
to me, very kind, most sincere, and gentle 
manly. As he is in constant employment at 
a good salary, I feel I would be secure and 
happy; but somehow the memory of the 
previous happening seems to haunt me." 
I would not allow that to interfere with 
your happiness. No doubt you have learned 
something of your new fiance s background, 
his relations and friends, and that will 
help you in any doubts you entertain. A 
man is known by the company he keeps, 
and it is there that you will doubtless be 
reassured. The fact is the previous horror is 
still in your mind. Dismiss it from your 
thoughts and start on the new life. 

Beware the Tempter: 

"For four years now I have been married 
and am very happy. Eecently at a dinner 
party and dance I met a young man whom 
I was very fond of some years back. In 
fact we were on the point of being engaged 
when he unaccountably fell in love with 
someone else and married within a month 
of his first meeting her. When I was danc 
ing with him he told me his marriage had 
been a failure, and he was now living apart 
from his wife. He added that when our 
friendship was broken up he now realised 
it was the saddest day of his life. He sug 
gested it would be nice if we wrote to each 
other occasionally just for old time s sake. 
It would also help to keep him straight, as 
he was very miserable and really did not 
care what happened to him. He said my 
husband need never know. Do you think I 

should write him?" Edna W. Have 

nothing at all to do with him. To my mind 
he is altogether unprincipled, and is 
possessed of a certain kind of low-down 
cunning which might involve you if your 
letters were produced. You are happily 
married, so don t do anything to mar that 
happiness. These renewed acquaintances, 
"warmed-up affairs" they call them in 
America, are dangerous. Do not write or 
see him. 

Too Young: 

"I have a boy who is respectable and 
who never keeps me out late at nights. I 
am fond of dancing, but as he doesn t 
dance I have never been to any for his 
sake. I would have no one to take me and- 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



he is of a jealous nature. He has no 
ambition to learn dancing 1 . He, however, 
is very fond of races and billiards, and 
spends hours in the billiard room. I think 
he should give up some of this and take 
me to a dance, say once a fortnight. I am 
really fond of him, but what would you 
advise? I am 16 years old and he is 20. 
He knows that I have always disapproved 
of races, but it doesn t worry him at all." 

V.J.P. A boy of 20 who is keen on 

racing and billiards is not worth troubling 
over. Also at 16 you are too young to 
think of any boy seriously. Forget him, 
and get hold of some agreeable girl friends 
or join a tennis club, where you will meet 
a lot of nice folks. 
Down- trodden Father: 

"In the course of the next few months I 
will be leaving home to be married and I 
do so with regret for father s sake. My 
mother treats him shabbily. He is a well- 
educated and refined man in an excellent 
position, and has kept the home most com 
fortably as long as I can remember. We 
received a good education, everything we 
wanted. Father was most generous to us 
on our birthdays and on other little cele 
bration occasions. He is just an ideal, 
generous dad; but he gets a shocking time 
of it from mother. She never takes him 
into her confidence about anything, and 
talks to him in a way that is both rude 
and humiliating. He apparently takes no 
notice, but I can see that her bullying , 
unkind mannerisms hurt him. I spoke to 
him on one occasion about this, but he told 
me he could not discuss mother with me; 
it would be disloyal. 

"Now I am leaving home (my other 
three sisters are married), and I feel real 
sorry for dad, as I know my absence will 
make it all the harder for him. My pfle- 
sence, I am sure, was a restraint on mum. 
Can I do anything in this matter?" 

Sarah E. There is nothing you can do 

beyond visiting the old home when oppor 
tunity offers. The remedy was in your 
father s hands in his early marriage days 
when he allowed his wife all her own way, 
and spoiled her. And now, with the passing 
of the years, she has become more arrogant 
and offensive, and perhaps does not know 
it. A somewhat similar case was mentioned 
in the newspapers some months ago when 
the husband sought a divorce from his 
wife after many years of marriage. He 
said he wanted peace in his old age. He 
had waited till his children were all mar 
ried, because he did not want to cause any 
publicity or scandal; but now he was quite 
prepared to make his wife a generous 
allowance, and all he asked in return was 
to be let alone, and allowed to live what 
was left of his life in peace and quiet 
no nagging, no fault-finding, no pushing 
around, and no abusing. 



KNITTED AND CROCHET TOYS. 
We have published a booklet which 
will be appreciated by those interested in 
knitted and crochet toys. Full instructions 
and illustrations are given for the follow 
ing: The Duck; A Cuddlesome Pup; Our 
Fluffy Lamb; Christmas Doll Set, compris 
ing Coat, Dress, Bootless, Bonnet, Singlet 
and Pilchers; Eddie, the Elephant; Knitted 
Lamb; Jumbo in Crochet; Poodle Purse; 
Lamb; Jumbo in Crochet; Poodle Purse; 
Humpty Dumpty; Mickey Mouse. The 
ideal instruction book for toy-makers and 
Red Cross workers. Send I/- postal note 
for a copy. 

The best time to settle a strike is before 
it starts. 



THROW OFF THE MASK! 

PIMPLES, BLACKHEADS are UGLY FEATURES 

Refined Folk Avoid Your Acquaintance 
I tell readers of this Journal free how to remove blemishes in ten days 

Stubborn cases that baffled physicians and beauty 
specialists Rave been cured. You have never used or 
heard of anything like it Makes muddy complexions, 
red spots, pimples, blackheads, eruptions, vanish 
almost like magic. No cream, lotion, enamel, salve 
plaster, bandage, mask, massage, diet or apparatus, 
nothing to swallow. It doesn t matter if your com 
plexion is a "fright," whether your face is full of muddy 
spots, peppery blackheads, embarrassing pimples and 
eruptions or if your skin is rough and "porey," and 
vou ve tried almost everything under the sun to get 
rid of the blemishes. This wonderful treatment, in just 
ten days, positively removes every blemish, and beau 
tifies your skin in a marvellous way You look years 
vounger. It gives the skin the bloom, tint and purity 
of a freshly blown rose. In ten days you can be the 
subject of wild admiration by vour friends, no matter 
what vour aee 

ALL METHODS NOW KNOWN ARE CAST ASIDE 

There is nothing to wear, nothing to take internally. Your face, even arms, hands, shoulders are 
beautified beyond your fondest dreams. All this I will absolutely prove to you before your own eyes 
in your mirror in ten days. This treatment is absolutely harmless to the most delicate skin, and 
very pleasant to use. No change in your mode of living necessary. A few minutes daily does it. 
To every reader of this Journal I will give full details of this really astounding treatment. Let m 
show you. You risk nothing. Send me 4d. in stamps, your name and address, and I will giv 
vou full details. 

MISS GRACE DUNCAN (Suite H8), BOX 4138 G.P.O., SYDNEY 

491 PITT STREET, SYDNEY 





A Day to learn to Play 

this amazing new way! 



JUST ARRIVED A limited .apply of am.- 
._.^ _- zing new lesson books 
hal will quickly teach you ai home to play either the 
Guitar, Banjo Mandolin, Piano, Saxophone, Piano 
Accordion, Clarinet, Violin, Mouth Organ, Ukulele, or 
Button Accordion. Think oJ it you can star! play 
ing in thirty minutes and play all popular tunes in a 
few weeks without previous knowledge ol music. 



HOW YOU LEARN 



privateiy, 



.* 

just 



and you instrument nobody else and no other teacher. 
The Lessons show you everything. You pav as von 
learn but there s no charge at all il vow re not 
satisfied. Each student receives our special 

30-DAY MONEY-BACK 

GUARANTEE 

If you ve ever wanted to learn, this is your chance. The coupon below 
is your passport lo a new and fascinating hobby to friend*, fun, 
outings, extra money perhaps a career- 

INSTRUMENTS Exclusive models available 

on weekly payments freight / * 



free to wherever you live. Ask for our new catalogue when writing 
mention instrument favoured. 




JO 00 

ONLY 



Mail the coupon to-day and get your copy. Don t delay. This fact 
packed book will tell you how to start playing in 30 minutes and play 
all popular tunes in a few weeks. How |" "" 

to learn at home without the cost of 
visits to a teacher, and how to banish 
nervousness and play ai parties even 
ings, whether you are a beginner or not. 
But avoid delay there are only 1000 free 
books bound to go quickly. Post the 
Coupon to-day for yours. 




TO SAMPSON S Depu JO, 
481 KF.M ST., BOX 4184X. G.P.O., SYDNEY. 

Please forward full particulars and free book without 

obligation. I enclose 2Jd. postage stamp. 

NAME 



ADDRESS.. 



\ 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 






Mrs. B. WEST, 
formerly of Eng 
land, and now of 
Rathay St., Vic- 
toria Park, W.A. 



FOR RECENT ARRIVAL 
FROM ENGLAND 

Arriving in Australia to start life 
anew, Mrs. West very soon had a 
reminder of England on seeing an 
ASPRO packet. Apparently it was 
such a happy link with old associa 
tions and a good first impression of 
Australia that Mrs. West felt 
prompted to write, straight away, as 
follows: "As a recent arrival from 
the Old Country I was very pleased 
to be greeted with the familiar 
ASPRO packet when I stepped 
ashore at Fremantle. My brother-in-law and his wife first 
recommended ASPRO 1 to us many years ago in England 
since when my husband and I have always received mar 
vellous relief, when treating colds and flu with ASPRO ." 

Do you know that ASPRO, 1 an Australian discovery, is 
now sold in nearly every corner of the globe? It has the 
biggest sale in the world of any medicine of its kind 
because it never fails to do what it is claimed to do. 

ASPRO 

DOB NOT HARM the HEARTorSTOMACH 



Swift, Certain, 
SAFE relief for 

COLDS 

INFLUENZA 

SLEEPLESSNESS 

TEMPERATURE 

FEVERISHNESS 

SORE THROAT 

IRRITABILITY 

RHEUMATISM 

TOOTHACHE 

NEURALGIA 

LUMBAGO 

SCIATICA 
NEURITIS 
HFADACHE 
NERVE PAINS 





Two ASPRO 1 tab 
lets and a cup of 
tea soothe headache 
and nerviness away 
in a few minutes. 



ASPRO andWoter- 
o splendid gargle 
for Sore Throat 




EVEN A CHILD 

CAN TAKE ASPRO 



The purity of Aspro conforms to the 
standard laid down by the British Phar 
macopoeia the guiding authority of the 
Medical Profession. 



COBYRIGHT 



[The columns of this department for the answers to 
correspondents are designed to prove of genuine help and 
benefit to readers who desire information concerning 
matters of dress, housekeeping, etiquette, the toilet, or 
hygiene. In addition to the proper signature (which will 
never be published under any circumstances) , corre 
spondents are requested to send a pen-name, to which 
the answer may be addressed.} 

STRAWBERRY CHARTREUSE. One and a 
half pint packets of lemon jelly, a gill of 
cream, a pint of custard, i a Ib. of straw 
berries. Make i a pint of jelly according 
to directions. Put a thin layer in the bot 
tom of a mould, stand it in cold water to 
set, then on this place a quarter of the 
strawberries. Cover them with the re 
mainder of the jelly, put it in gently with 
a spoon and leave until set. Cut in pieces 
the pint tablet of jelly and melt it in a 
^ of a pint of hot Water, cool, then stir in 
the custard, the cream whipped stiff, and 
the remainder of the strawberries cut in 
quarters. Stir to mix well. Put, by spoons 
ful, into the mould containing the jelly, 
be careful not to disturb the latter. And 
turn out when set. Sweets such as this 
containing jelly and cream need careful 
turning out. It is best to plunge the mould, 
as far as the cream reaches, in hot water 
for a few seconds. If the jelly is shaken 
out it will most probably break. Mrs. 
W. D. 

FOE FLUFFY HAIB. "Ginger" is anxious 
to know how to cure greasy hair and to 

stop it falling out. Wash your hair not 

more often than once a week with a good 
shampoo, and brush it vigorously for 10 
minutes every night. Eub the scalp with 
hair tonic twice a week. A henna rinse 
made by pouring a pint of boiling water 
over 1 oz. of powdered henna and straining 
wken cool, will restore the original colour 
to "Ginger s" hair. 

STRENGTHENING THE EYELASHES. "What 
can I do to make my eyebrows grow 
darker? I am very fair, and they hardly 
show up at all," writes "Fair." Scanty 
and blonde eyelashes and eyebrows can be 
darkened and strengthened by the appli 
cation of castor oil. Apply this with a 
camel s hair brush. 

CHICKEN PATTIES. Take i Ib. cold 
chicken, 1 oz. butter, a gill of stock made 
from chicken bones, \ a teaspoonful grated 
rind of lemon, i Ib. lean cooked ham, a 
gill cream or milk, \ a teaspoonful salt, a 
pinch of pepper, a pinch of grated nutmeg, 
flaky pastry. Line some rather deep patty 
pans with good flaky pastry, put a piece 
of crust of bread in each, cover with pastry, 
and bake in a quick oven for 15 minutes. 
Remove the cover, take out the bread, fill 
with cream of chicken, replace the cover, 
and brush the edges with white of an egg 
to make them adhere. To make the cream, 
of chicken, mince the chicken and ham 
very finely, roll the butter in a saltspoon- 
ful of flour, put these in a saucepan with 
the other ingredients, and simmer gently 
for 10 minutes. Stir to prevent burning. 
The stock used should be a thick jelly; if 
not, dissolve a leaf of gelatine in it before 
using. Mrs. F. P. 

SPINACH AND EGGS ON TOAST. Chop 1 
small onion very fine and cook 5 minutes 
in 3 tablespoonsful fat. Add 2 cupsful 
spinach, cooked or canned, chopped fine, 
and 2 or 3 hard-cooked eggs coarsely 
chopped, reserving slices of egg for gar 
nish. Stir and cook until heated through 
and serve on squares of toast, garnished 
with egg slices and toast points. Mrs. 
W. O B. 

WEDDING INVITATION. The wedding invi- 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



tations are generally sent out in letter 
form on specially selected and printed 
sheets. The paper must be very good, but 
plain white. The usual form is as follows: 
"Mr. and Mrs. Grey request the pleasure of 

presence at the 

marriage of their daughter Sybil with 
Arthur Thompson at six o clock at St. 
Mary s Church, and afterwards at "Hat- 
tersley," Cremorne. K.S.V.P." Miss M. 
L. L. 

FISH SOUFFLE. Half a Ib. of boiled fish, 
1 gill of milk, 2 eggs, 1 oz. of butter, 1 
level tablespoonful of flour, a squeeze of 
lemon juice, salt and pepper. Melt the 
butter, stir in the flour and cook gently 
until it is a smooth paste. Add the milk 
gradually and boil for 5 minutes. Remove 
any bnes from the fish, divide it into 
flakes and stir it into the sauce. Add the 
well-beaten yolks and stiffly-whipped 
whites of eggs, a seasoning of salt and 
pepper and the lemon juice. Fill a souffle 
case or pudding mould three parts full 
with the mixture. Steam gently for ^ an 
hour, and serve. Reader. 

So EMBARRASSING! "Would you please 
tell me how to prevent and cure sticky, 

clammy hands?" writes Phyllis P. Ask 

your chemist to make you up a lotion con 
sisting of 20 grains of tannic acid dis 
solved in 1 oz. of eau-de-Cologne. A few 
drops of the refreshing lotion rubbed into 
the palms of the hands will keep them cool 
and dry in the hottest weather. 

TOMATOES FOB BABY. "Is it all right to 
give tomatoes to my little boy of three? 

He is very fond of them." A.G.L. 

Strained tomato juice is excellent for him, 
and you can give him sandwiches made 
from the pulp, but try to avoid the pips 
and skin, as these may prove irritating. 
It is wisest not to give seeds or pips to 
children, but the juices of all the "soft" 
fruits are splendid for them, and, after 
all it is in these that the chief value lies. 

TOMATO AND PRAWN SALAD. Two large 
tomatoes, 2 doz. prawns, a few grains of 
cayenne pepper, 4 tablespoonsful of thick 
mayonnaise, 2 tablespoonsful of cream, 6 
drops of anchovy essence, 1 lettuce. Cut 
the tomatoes in halves across, scoop out 
the seeds and soft pulp, leave the firm part 
intact. Shell the prawns, add the cayenne 
to 2 tablespoonsful of mayonnaise and in 
this toss the prawns. Put the prawns in 
the tomato cases, dividing them equally, 
whip the cream, add the remaining mayon 
naise and anchovy. Mix well. Pile or 
pipe on to the tomato cases. Garnish with 
a lettuce cut in quarters and serve. F.C. 

WASHING WHITE FUR. Take 3 table- 
spoonsful of Lux, add about 1$ cupsful 
boiling water, let stand for a while until 
Lux is melted and water cold, then add a 
couple of pints of cold water. Let fur 
stand in this for about i hour or till you 
see that all the dirt is out: then put 
through clean, cool water, but do not 
wring, just squeeze water out of it as 
drying, tease the fur up with finger. L.X. 



AUSTRALIAN HOME JOURNAL 
BABY BOOK No. 5. 

All that is latest and best in Knitting and 
Crochet for Baby, clearly illustrated with 
instructions set out in the simplest way poss 
ible. It consists of: Pram Suit for the Baby 
Girl; Knitted Shell Set; Pram Cover; Roseleaf 
Layette; Mauryeen Crochet Set; Coat and 
Bonnet, Bubble Stitch; The Berry and Leaf 
Set; Alice Baby Set; Pamela Outfit; The 
Graham Suit; Baby s Shawl; Jessica Coat and 
Bonnet; Billie-Boy Outdoor Suit. Price 1/3 
(by Postal Note) to Australian Home Journal, 
407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. [Knitting 
Books 1, 2, 3, 4 sold out.] 




The Doctor Answers 

ABOUT BACKACHE: 

Patient: "Why do so many people suffer with Backache, 

Doctor?" 
Doctor: "Because your back muscles are working constantly 

holding up your body, any extra strain is quickly felt; 

again, uric acid and other poisons often collect in 

these muscles if your kidneys and bowels are not 

functioning well and correctly." 

Patient: "But, why. Doctor, do these poisons in the blood 

so often affect the muscles of the back?" 
Doctor: "For the reason I gave just now you feel the effect 

of these blood poisons in the weakest or most over 
worked parts of your body first. If you feel the 

effects in your back muscles, you can be sure they 

are everywhere in your muscles and joints, and the 

sensible thing to do is to get rid of these poisons as 

quickly as you can." 

If you suffer from Backache, rheumatic pains, sciatica, lumbago, kidney and 
bladder weaknesses, neuritis, gout, or similar aches and pains, you will be 
delighted with the relief and renewed energy Menthoids 
jpill give you. Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids contain Thionine 
the great blood medicine which does so much to drive 
out these crippling poisons from your blood, strengthen 
ye-ur kidneys and tone up your whole system. 

Get a month s treatment fiask of Dr. Mackenzie s 
Menthoids for 6/6 with Diet Chart, or a 12-day 
flask for 3/6, from your nearest chemist or store, 
or a postal note to British Medical Laboratories, 
Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney, will bring you 
Menthoids by return mail. 

M64 



MENTHOIDS M BACKACHE 



HER RHEUMATISM GOES AS SHE LOSES UGLY FAT 

Great London Hospital endorses famous Youth-0-Form 

"For many years," says Mrs. Fitzpatrick, "I have been crippled with rheumatism, 
until some friends recommended me to take Youth-O-Form to reduce my weight. 
I DID REDUCE and, more marvellous still, my rheumatism completely disappeared. 
That was four years ago. The London winter I find very severe, and this year I 
got rheumatism badly again, and all the prescriptions were useless. I told my doctor, 
who is leading physician at one of the big hospitals here, that Youth-O-Form wat 
the only thing that ever did me any good, and he advised me to try it again, and 
that the Youth-O-Form prescription was 
well known. Once again I am quite well 
and fit." 

If you are overweight and 

suffer from Rheumatism, 

Indigestion, Constipation, 

or constant headaches, 

Youth-O-Form will help 

you, too. 





Mrt. Darley, pictured below, is only 
one of countless Australian women 
u<ho have regained health and appear- 
ance through Youth-O-Form. 



WHAT YOU SHOULD WEIGH 


Height 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-40 


ft. in. 


st. Ib. 


st. Ib. 


st. lb. 


st. Ib. 


St. ll>. 


4 11 


7 5 


7 8 


7 11 


8 


8 3 


5 


7 7 


7 10 


7 13 


8 2 


8 5 


5 1 


7 9 


7 12 


8 1 


8 4 


8 7 


5 2 


7 12 


8 1 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


5 3 


8 1 


8 4 


8 6 


8 9 


8 13 


5 4 


8 4 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


5 5 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


9 7 


5 6 


8 11 


9 


9 3 


9 7 


9 11 


5 7 


9 1 


9 4 


9 7 


9 11 


10 1 


5 8 


9 5 


9 8 


9 11 


10 1 


10 5 


Add 3lb. for every five years ever forty. 



MRS. DARLEY 
Typical Australian 

Mother 

Height: 5ft. 3 ins 
Weight : 122 Ib. 



Youth-O-Porm is pleasant, effective, per- 
| manent and easy to take. 
"JU can get the six weeks Youth-O-Form 
Treatment for 20/- (or a 10-day 
Carton. 5/fii from your nearest 
Chemist. 

If far ironi a Chemist, pin 
a Postal Note to a. piece of 
paper with your name and 
address; send it to British 
Medical Laboratories. 
Box 4155, G.P.O.. Syd 
ney, and your Youth-O- 
Form will reach 
you by return mall 
lainly wrapped 
and with full 
directions for 



YOUTH-O-FORM 



Tonic 

REDUCING 

CAPSUtES 



v-w 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 





its FPST! easy/ SQFE.I 



What a world of difference a better 
cleanser can make! 

Grit-free Bon Ami is so fast so easy 
so safe. Removes dirt quickly with 
out leaving dirt-catcking scratches to 
dull a shining surface, without redden 



ing or roughening your pretty hands. 
And it actually polishes as it cleans. 
That means you work much less to 
get a brilliant lustre on your bath^ 
basins and kitchen sink. Try 
Bon Ami to-day. See how 
much better it is! 



BON AMI 



Jiasnf- scratched yef 

/ 







POWDER 
and CAKE 



w 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



PEN EL OPE FROCK 



Materials: 6 ozs. Paton s Azelea crochet 
wool; 1 pair No. 10 knitting needles; 3 
small buttons; 1 yard narrow ribbon for 
sleeve; a medium crochet hook. 

Measurements: Length from top of 
shoulder, 16 ins.; width all round at 
underarm, 20 ins.; length of sleeve from 
underarm, 2$ ins. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st., 
stitch; tog., together; wl. fwd., wool for 
ward; d.c., double crochet. 

Tension: To obtain the above measure 
ments it is absolutely necessary to work 
at a tension to produce 8 sts. to the inch 
in width. If this tension is not obtain 
able on the needles recommended, use 
finer or coarser as necessary. 



Proceed as follows (with right side of 
work facing) : 

1st row: K. 3, p. 1, (k. 3 tog., p. 1) 14 
times, work 31 sts. in pattern. (P. 1, k. 3 
tog.) 14 times, p. 1, k. 3 (95 sts.). 

2nd row: K. 1, p. 2, (k. 1, p. 1) 14 times, 
k. 33, (p. 1, k. 1) 14 times, p. 2, k. 1. 

Work 10 more rows, working the centre 
31 sts. in pattern, the 29 sts. at either side 
of the pattern panel in rib of k. 1, p. 1, 
and the 3 sts. at each end in plain, smooth 
fabric. 

Next row (right side of work facing) : 
(K. 2, k. 2 tog.) 8 times, k. 31, (k. 2 tog., 
k. 2) 8 times (79 sts.). 

Continue in plain, smooth fabric, cast 
ing off 4 sts. at beginning of each of the 







The Front. 

Cast on 151 sts. very loosely. 

1st row: K. 1, * wl. fwd., k. 3, k. 3 tog., 
k. 3, wl. fwd., k. 1; repeat from * to end 
of row. 

2nd row: K. 1, p. to last st., k. 1. 

3rd row: As 1st row. 

4th row: Knit. 

Kepeat these 4 rows 5 times more, then 
the 1st and 2nd once more. 

Proceed as follows: 

1st row: K. 60. work next 31 in pattern, 
k. 60. 

2nd row: K. 1, p. 59, k. 31, p. 59, k. 1. 

Continue working the centre 31 sts. in 
pattern and the 60 sts. at each side plain, 
smooth fabric until the work measures 
11J ins. from commencement, ending with 
the 2nd pattern row in the centre panel. 



next 2 rows and 1 st. at beginning of each 
of the following 12 rows (59 sts.). 

Continue without further decrease until 
3^ ins. of plain, smo oth fabric have been 
knitted. 

Next row (front of work facing) : k. 19, 
cast off 21, k. 19. 

Continue on last 19 sts., casting off one 
at neck edge in the 2nd and following 
alternate row. 

With back of work facing, shape shoulder 
as follows: 

Cast off 8 sts., purl to end. 

Cast off 1 st. at beginning of next row, 
and knit to end. Cast off remaining 8 sts. 

Return to the 19 sts. left on needle, and 
work other shoulder to correspond, re 
versing neck and shoulder shaping. 



The Back. 

Work exactly as for front until the arm- 
holes are reached. 

Cast off 4 sts. at beginning of each of 
the next 2 rows (71 sts.). 

With front of work facing, slip 38 sts. 
on a spare needle for right side of back 
of bodice. Joining wool at centre back, 
cast on 5 sts.; knit these 5 and then the 
remaining 33 sts., giving 38 sts. for left 
side of back of bodice. 

Proceed in plain, smooth fabric, casting 
off 1 st. at armhole end of every alternate 
row until 32 sts. are left. 

Continue without further decrease until 
the armhole measures the same as front 
armhole. 

Cast off 8 sts. at shoulder end of next 
and following alternate row. 

Work one more row, then east off remain 
ing 16 sts. 

Return to the 38 sts. left on spare 
needle, and work right side of bodice to 
correspond, reversing armhole and shoulder 
shapings and making a buttonhole every 
1J ins. as follows: 

1st buttonhole row: Knit to last 4 sts., 
cast off 2, k. 2. 

2nd butonhole row: K. 1, p. 1, cast on 2 
sts., p. to last st., k. 1. 

The Sleeves (both alike). 

Cast on 71 sts. very loosely. 

Work in pattern as given at beginning 
of front of frock for 2$ ins. Decrease 2 
sts. at beginning of each of the next 4 
rows, and 1 st. at beginning of each of 
the following 24 rows, being careful to 
allow for the variations in the patter* 
caused by knitting 3 tog. and making sts. 
Cast off in threes as follows: 

K. 3 tog., * k. 3 tog., pass 1st st. on 
right-hand needle over 2nd. Eepeat from 
* until all sts. are cast off. 

The Collar (two pieces alike). 

Cast on 51 sts. very loosely. 

Work 12 rows in pattern as given for 
front of frock. 

Proceed as follows: 

1st row: K. 1, * k. 3, k. 3 tog., k. 3, k. 1; 
repeat from * to end of row. 

2nd row: K. 1, p. to last st., k. 1. 

3rd row: K. 2, * k. 2 tog., k. 1; repeat 
from * to end of row. Cast off. 
To Make Up. 

Using a damp cloth and a warm iron, 
press all parts lightly. Work honeycomb 
smocking over the four panels f k. 1, 
p. 1, rib, catching together the ribs of 
knit st. in pairs. 

Join shoulder, side and sleeve seams, 
and set in sleeves, placing seam to seam. 
Work a row of d.c. down each side of back 
opening, and stitch underlap into place. 
Sew collar into position. Thread ribbom 
through sleeves at the level of the 4th row 
of holes, and up from the lower edge of 
sleeves. Sew on buttons to correspond 
with buttonholes. 



The luxury homes of the stars are for 
sale cheap a sure sign of the times in 
extravagant Hollywood. Places with swim 
ming pools and ornate tennis courts are on 
the bargain counter. Among the sellers 
arc Nelson Eddy, Robert Taylor and Bar 
bara Stanwyck, Lilli Palmer and Rex Har 
rison. The late Wallace Beery s and Earl 
Carroll s mansions are on the market. Al 
Jolson gave his home to the Cedars of 
Lebanon Hospital. 



Money to-day is about as useful as a 
glass eye at a keyhole. 



10 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



This is the Beginning 

NAN E. PATTINSON. 

When you have been trying to forget a man for a year and then he telephones you 
asking you to meet him and arrives with another girl what are you to think? 



At first Sue hadn t recognised his voice. 
It was so absolutely unexpected. So very 
much what she had once longed for unbear 
ably and then put resolutely behind her. 
For over a year she had been trying to 
forget Charle s ever since she came out of 
the W.A.A.F. It had been a hard and 
painful process and not entirely successful. 

Now here he was, saying: 

"Hello, is that Sue? This is Charles 
Bristowe, if you re 
member me. I m here 
in Market Eosing 



farmhouse; Mother in her apron and Dad 
in his shirtsleeves. Cows in the shippen 
waiting to be milked; the distant smell of 
pigs. The utter homeliness of it all. It 
was that kind of farm. 
She said quickly: 

"I I was coming into the town this 
morning." 

"Oh, good. What 
about 12.30 at the 



least friendship. And friendship deserved 
something better than the empty silence 
that had followed. 

You had fought the desolation. The 
knowledge that it was all one-sided. That 
Charles hadn t really cared. After all, 
why should anyone as utterly marvellous 
as Charles care for a girl like yourself? A 
farmer s daughter. The sort of girl who 
was a little too tall and a little too quiet. 
Who wasn t glamorous or smart or gay. 
A dull sort of girl really. 

Her mother was calling again. 
"Sue, dear, one of the pigs got out." 
"All right, Mother. I ll catch him." 
The March sun gilded the edges of the 
straw stack. Across a bright blue sky 



like 
see 



very 
you 



and I d 
much to 
again." 

Sue swallowed, 
fought down 
confusion 





and awkward 
ness and a sud 
den sense of 
almost unbear 
able joy. 

"Hello, Charles! What 
a what a nice sur 
prise!" She longed for a 
flow of easy small talk, 
to be one of those girls who 
-could chatter gaily and 
amusingly over the tele 
phone putting themselves across. 

"I m staying at the Green Dragon," he 
went, on. "Do you live very far out of 
the town? I wondered if you could have 
luncheon here with me? Or I could come 
out and see you whenever it s convenient." 

The telephone was in the stone-flagged 
ihall. Through the window Sue caught a 
iglimpse of the yard beyond; the . hens 
pecking about among untidy straw, a 
string of ducks waddling across to the 
nearby pond. 

"Come out and see you," Charles had 
just said. She was panic-stricken. Not 
this first meeting here, after so long! This 
was no setting for romance. The shabby 



Dragon? I ll be 
waiting for you 
in the lounge. 
It will be great 
to see you 
again, Sue, I " 
Mother was 
calling a rising 
crescendo of sound 
from the kitchen. 
"Sue Sue!" 
"I must go, 
Charles. I ll see 
you at 12.30, and 
thank you very 
much." 
She replaced the receiver. 
It was like a dream. You waited and 
waited. Because you were so sure Charles 
would call or write. Because it was so hard 
to believe that the shared months at 
Heteringham hadn t meant something deep 
and good to both of you. If not love, at 



It was Linda, Sue s 

cousin, and standing 
beside her, tall and 
broad-shouldered and 
unforgettably the 
same, was Charles. 



clouds, like little balls of 
white cotton-wool, drifted. 
The duck pond was an up 
turned mirror. In the mead 
ows beyond the young lambs were 
bleating. 

It was as if someone had drawn a 
curtain back overnight. Look, they 
said, it s really spring. Spring, clear 
and tender and radiant, as if it had 
never all happened before. She 
thought, what a wonderful day! As if 
everything had just been born ... as if 
everything were just beginning . . . 

The pig scuttled grunting back into the 
sty. She latched the gate firmly after him 
and walked back to the house. 

Her mother was rolling out pastry in the 
big, white-washed kitchen. 

"Mother, someone telephoned and asked 
me out to lunch. A friend I knew in the 
W.A.A.F. Is it all right if I go into town 
this morning? Did you want me for any 
thing?" 

Her mother looked up, brushing her rosy 
cheek with a plump, befloured hand. 

"I don t think so, dear. David s plough 
ing Long Christie and Ted will be back for 
the yard work. You won t be able to take 
the car; Dad is going over to Burberrys 
this afternoon." 

"I ll cycle," Sue said. 

"You might call about the broken pig 
trough. And bring some fish from Macey s 
plaice, I think I m glad you re meeting 
one of your friends, dear. You must miss 
them at times. Was she with you in the 
Meteorological ?" 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



11 



"It s a he," she answered. "Charles Brifl- 
towe." She hesitated. "I think I ll go 
and change into a skirt." 

Mrs. Graham fluted the edges of the 
rhubarb pie without looking up. 

"I should do. Wear your blue." 

The blue was so countrified. Sue eyed 
the simply cut tweed coat and skirt un 
enthusiastically. It wasn t good enough for 
Charles. He had never seen her in civilian 
clothes. The W.A.A.F. uniform had suited 
her as well as anything she had ever worn. 
She must look as nice as Charles remem 
bered her, better, in fact. 

Nothing pleased her. She seemed to 
have spent her demobilisation coupons on 
all the wrong sorts of thing. Corduroy 
slacks and an odd jacket and underwear; 
wedge shoes and a couple of sweaters. 

The only thing was her green suit, the 
one she d had for Jean s wedding. It was 
rather on the dressy side for a lunch date 
in Market Kosing, but at least it was 
smart and more the sort of thing Charles 
was used to. She managed to adjust the 
small green hat that matched it to her 
satisfaction and went to tell her mother 
she was going. 

If she was more dressed up than usual 
Mrs. Graham made no observation upon it. 
She straightened up from the oven and 
turned a flushed cheek for Sue s kiss and 
aid: 

"Have a nice time, dear." 

"Thanks, Mummy." 

Sue went to collect her bicycle from the 
shed. 

"Don t forget to call at Eaynor s to see 
if the paraffin is in yet," her mother called 
from the doorway. 

"I won t." 

A pity she had to cycle, especially in her 
best stockings, and unfamiliarly high 
heels. I ll take it slowly, Sue told herself; 
I ll just dawdle along. 

The trees and hedges were dusted with 
a film of green, so delicate and intangible 
that you felt you almost imagined it. In 
the newly ploughed field beyond the road 
a lark was singing, a sweet and rapturous 
sound. 

Now she could really begin to think of 
seeing Charles again; to wonder why he 
had never written after she had suddenly 
left the W.A.A.F. because her brother 
David had been injured in a car smash and 
her parents had wanted her back to help 
nurse him and help on the farm. 

I ll do all the shopping first, Sue plan 
ned, then cool down and powder my nose 
and go to meet Charles. It was just strik 
ing twelve by the Market Hall clock as 
she jumped off her bicycle and left it 
behind Mr. Raynor s shop and went in to 
inquire about the paraffin. 

She bought the plaice and arranged to 
call back for it, then recrossed the street 
to Higson s. 

Someone said gaily: 

"Why, there she is! Hello, Sue. We 
were just going across to the Dragon to 
wait for you." 

It was Linda, Sue s cousin. And stand 
ing beside her, tall and broad shouldered 
and unforgettably the same, was Charles. 

He said: "Hello, Sue." 

He hadn t changed, not one scrap. The 
same thin, brown face; the same dark 
hazel eyes; the same smile that seemed so 
specially warm and friendly. The only 
difference was an unfamiliar brown suit 
in place of the remembered Air Force blue. 

She held out a hand. 

"Hello, Charles. How are you?" 

"Isn t it simply astonishing?" Linda 



cried. "Imagine the phone rang and it 
was Charles. I didn t even recognise his 
voice!" 

Nor did I, Sue thought. She looked at 
Linda. She was hatless with her glistening 
red gold hair, casual frock of cinnamon 
wool crepe, the bright emerald green of 
her scarf deepening the green of her eyes. 

Sue felt like Alice in Wonderland after 
she had eaten the piece of cake marked 
"Eat Me"; as if she were growing larger 
and larger, as if her wrists were shooting 
beyond the sleeves of her green suit and 
her neck elongating itself like a snake. 

Involuntarily her eyes went to Charles 
and found him watching her. He said 
quickly: 

"I didn t have a chance to tell you on 
the phone that Linda was coming. You 
rang off so quickly." 

"It s such fun to all meet again," Sue 
said bravely. 

She and Linda had been in the W.A.A.F. 
together, stationed at Heteringham at the 
same time that Charles was there. 

Some brightness had gone out of the day. 
A gust of chill March wind rattled round 
the corner at them, swirling the torn 
papers along the gutter. 

"Come on," Linda urged. "Don t let s 
waste time standing here. Let s go over 
to the Dragon." 

Sue looked towards the shop doorway. 

"I have to go in here," she said. Mad 
ness descended upon her. She heard her 
self explaining, "I have to call about a 
broken pig trough." 

Linda burst into a shrill peal of laughter. 

"Oh, darling, a pig trough! You re always 
on the most devastating errands. We ll go 
over and order you a drink and be wait 
ing. Come on, Charles." She slid one arm 
through his. "Hurry up," she called over 
her shoulder. 

Sue watched them walk away in the 
direction of the hotel. How odd that 
Charles had telephoned Linda, too, she 
thought. 

But not really odd at all. Quite natural, 
in fact. Why hadn t she seen it before 
that Linda was the reason for Charles 
defection? Linda had always liked him. 
She had stayed on at Heteringham after 
Sue had left. Perhaps because of that, 
and because Sue had been busy on the 
farm, they had seen very little of each 
other for some time. 

Maybe it was Linda s idea that they 
should all meet. Like Old Home Week. She 
wanted to giggle, yet ridiculously she felt 
tears pricking her eyes so that she had to 
stand and stare very hard at the farm 
implements in Higson s window. She could 
see a shadowy reflection of herself in the 
green suit that was suddenly all wrong 
and over-dressed. The green hat had 
tipped back from her fair hair and looked 
incongruous above the broad cheek-bones 
and candid grey eyes staring back at her. 
She had a childish impulse to put her 
tongue out at herself. 

Peasant face, she thought disparagingly. 
She wondered at the calm immobility of 
her expression. 

The pig trough was still being repaired. 
She thanked the man and walked reluct 
antly back into the street. 

Now for the Green Dragon. She would 
give anything to be able to go home 
never have to set eyes on Charles or Linda 
again, but she must go through with the 
luncheon. 

Linda waved at her across the low, 
heavily beamed room. 

"Cheers, Sue. Here s your gin and 
French ; we re one up on you." 



Above the rim of his glass Charles was 
staring at her. 

Amazed, no doubt. Amazed and amused 
at the metamorphosis from efficient 
W.A.A.F. to country bumpkin. All I want 
are straws in my hair, Sue thought bit 
terly. 

The second gin was unloosening Linda s 
tongue. She was being rather amusing in 
a sharp way. 

I can t compete, Sue thought. I ll just 
sit here and chew my cud reflectively. 

"Those certainly were the days," Charles 
aaid. "Do you miss it, Suet" 

"Sometimes," Sue answered. "Not 
really, I suppose. I m too busy." 

"I can t think why you ever joined the 
W.A.A.F.," Linda said. "You ought to 
have stayed on the farm and been a Land 
Girl." 

"Sometimes you feel like a change," Sue 
observed. She turned to Charles. "What 
are you doing now you re out of the Air 
Force, Charles?" 

"I m going to Kenya," Charles replied 
unexpectedly. 

Kenya. A thousand or more miles away. 
But no farther from her than he had al 
ready travelled. 

"What fun," Linda said, lighting another 
cigarette from the stump of her old one. 
"I should adore Kenya." 

"It s quite a place," Charles said. "I ve 
a great pal who trained out there. He 
used to tell me about the flamingos on 
Lake Nakuru. Said they were like a pink 
cloud shot with crimson when they rose 
in flight, thousands and thousands of em." 

A pink cloud of flamingos. A strange 
and beautiful sight in a strange and beau 
tiful land. I ll never see anything like 
that, Sue thought. She remembered chas 
ing the pig back into the sty and smiled 
wryly. 

"What s the joke?" Charles asked. 

She shook her head. 

"Nothing," she answered. I m the joke, 
she thought. The joke s on me. Being so 
thrilled and excited to see you dressing 
up ... only to find myself the awkward 
side of a triangle . . . 

She wondered why Charles wasn t stay 
ing at Linda s home. She could picture 
Uncle Robert, bland and urbane over his 
after-dinner cigar; Aunt Muriel, hospitable 
and charming, with her tinted hair neatly 
waved above the mauve and lilac twin sets 
she habitually wore. 

"Food seems to be indicated," Charles 
remarked. "Let s go." 

It seemed an interminable meal. Linda 
and Charles did most of the talking be 
tween them while Sue sat and listened. 
She longed for it to be over so that she 
could escape and cycle home. 

"Charles, do come home and see the 
parents," Linda invited. "I warned them 
you might and they re hoping to meet 
you." 

Charles hesitated. He looked across at 
Sue. 

"What about you, Sue?" he asked 
politely. His look held an expression she 
couldn t analyse. A question a sort of 
pleading. For what? Not forgiveness. 
There was nothing to forgive because there 
had never been anything concrete between 
them. 

"You come, too," Linda added hastily. 
"I d love you to, Sue. I didn t ask be 
cause you re always so busy." 

"I m afraid I am," Sue agreed. "Thanks 
all the same, Linda, but I do hare to get 
back." 

"I thought so," Linda answered, with 
some satisfaction. 



12 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



They had finished their coffee in the 
lounge. 

"I really think " Sue began. 

"Yea, we must go, too," Linda said, 
jumping p. "I ve got the car here; can 
we give you a lift?" 

"No, thank you," Sue said. She held 
oat her hand. 

It s been such fun to all meet again, 
Charles. I have enjoyed it. Thank you 
very much for lunch." 

Charles seemed reluctant to let go of 
her hand. 

"I ve enjoyed it, too," ^ 

he said. "I ll be around f|i; : 
for a couple of days, ||1 
Sue. What about meet 
ing again?" 

The questioning 
look was still 4/- 
there, bt it ; T- : 

eouldm t mean any 
thing. 



and Linda meant well enough. They were 
trying to be kind and friendly. 

This morning had seemed to be the be 
ginning of everything the bright sunny 
spring day, the meeting ahead of her, the 
dream come true. 

Now it was ending. She pedalled labori 
ously up the hill towards home, her green 
hat resting on the fish in the basket in 
front of her. 

Her mother was still in the kitchen, only 
now she was ironing. 

"Did you have a nice time, dearf" she 
asked, looked up at Sue for a 
probing second and then looked 
away again. "Oh, you remembered 
the fish. What a help." 



jmi ;:*::% 



The afternoon wore on. Now the colour 
had gone out of the day and the light was 
beginning to fade. David came in from 
the fields with the horses. They stood 
stamping and steaming in the yard, wait 
ing to g-o across to the stables to be fed 
and watered. 

Sue shut the ducks up for the night and 
then carried a bucket of potato peelings 
across to the washhonse to be "boiled for 
the pigs. She stirred the unappetising 
mess with a long stick. No matter what 
your feelings were the insistent farm life 
went on, crowding out personal emotion 
and despair. 

A first star pricked 
the shaft of sky be 
yond the open door 
way. A cow coughed 
from the shed. Mike 
began to bark from 
his kennel. 




"I m awfully 
busy," Sue said 
brightly, trying to sound 
gay and inconsequential 
like Linda. "So in case 
we don t meet, Charles, 
good-bye and good 
luck." 

"Good-bye," Charles said abruptly. 

Linda leant forward and laid a cool, 
pink cheek against Sue s. 

"We ll be seeing each other quite soon. 
Give my love to Aunt Rose and Uncle 
David. Bye, Sue darling." 

A dreadful sense of anti-climax de 
scended on Sue as she made her way back 
towards Mr. Raynor s shop. There was a 
hard, heavy lump inside her that hurt. 
Why couldn t they have left her alone? 
What had made them do this to her?" 

She blinked the tears away fiercely. Don t 
be such a fool, she admonished. Charles 



"You never answered my 

letter, Sue. I thought you 

had forgotten me." 

"I had a very nice time," 
Sue said slowly. "Linda was 
there, too. We all knew each 
other at Heteringham." 
"Linda! What a surprise. What is she 
doing with herself now?" Mrs. Graham 
gently smoothed the sleeve of the shirt 
across the ironing board. "Dear, I didn t 
feed the hens. Will you do itf And shut 
the ducks up." 

"I ll go and change first," Sue said. 
She pushed the green suit to the back of 
her wardrobe as if by so doing she could 
forget it and the day s disillusionment. 
She slipped on her corduroy slacks and a 
blue woollen skirt-blouse, and then went 
downstairs to do some of the many jobs 
always waiting to be attended to. 



Someone said "Hello, Sue," and she 
turned in amazement. 

It was Charles. 

He stood, a bulky shadow outlined 
against the blue dusk. 

Sue pushed back a strand of hair. 

"Why, Charles! Whatever are you doing 
here?" 

He folded his arms, leaned against the 
lintel. 

"Your mother told me where to find you. 
I had an idea there were one or two things 
we hadn t cleared up, Sue. Linda s so 
very shall we say appropriative, she 
didn t give me much chance." 

Sue couldn t think of anything to say. 
She went on stirring the pig food which 
had begun to bubble. 

Charles went on speaking. 

"You see, I telephoned Linda by mis 
take to-day. I thought it was you. I asked 
for Miss Graham and it was Linda, so 1 
asked her for your number. I never had 
your actual home address; I just knew it 
was somewhere near Market Bosing, so I 
looked it up in the telephoe directory. 
Got Linda s number thinking it was yours." 

Sue stopped stirring and looked up at 
him. Somewhere inside her a current of 
warmth, a sense of relief, of reprieve, was 
beginning to flow. She said: 

"That s understandable. Linda is Manor 
House Farm, we re just Manor Farm. Uncle 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



13 



Robert isn t a farmer like father; he rents 
the land out." 

"I didn t like to seem rude, especially 
when she was BO hearty and friendly," 
Charles explained. "I thought we could 
all have lunch together and then I d have 
you on my own. It didn t work out like 
that." 

The current stopped flowing. Sue remem 
bered the empty gap; the long silence. 
Wasn t this rather a belated desire to see 
her again? 

As if in answer to her thoughts, Charles 
said: 

"You never answered my letter, Sue. I 
thought you d forgotten me or got hitched 
up or something. Then when this Kenya 
job came up and I knew I d be clearing out 
of England I felt I just had to see you 
again, to see which way the land lay." 

"But I never had any letter," Sue pro 
tested. "I wondered why you never 
wrote after I left Heteringham." 

"I gave the letter to Linda, to send on 
to you," Charles said. "She was your 
cousin, and we were all friendly." 

There was a small silence. Charles added 
quickly: 

"I left Heteringham the week after you 
did. I was posted to Germany, and I 
asked you to write to me there." 

They stared at one another. 

Now the current was a tide. A warm, 
swelling tide of love and happiness. 

Charles straightened up from the door 
post, moved so that he was suddenly close 
beside her. He said: 

"I love you, Sue. There s no one else 
for me you re so calm and kind and 
gentle." He put out a hand and smoothed 
the strand of silky hair back from her 



face. "So real, Sue. Real and beautiful. 
Will you marry me and come to Kenya! 
You re the sort of girl Kenya wants." 

"Oh, Charles." Sue wanted to cry. 
Above the evening star the moon had 
appeared, bathing the straw stack in 
radiance, glinting on the curved tiles of 
the house. Charles and Kenya. And the 
flamingos rising like a pink cloud. . . 

"I thought it was Linda," Sue said. "I 
thought you didn t care." 

"But I do care," Charles said. His arms 
closed round her. He said: "As long as 
you care, too." 

"I ve always cared," Sue answered 
serenely. She heard one of the farm hands 
bang the barn door to; heard him call 
"good-night" and hia footsteps go crunch 
ing across the yard. 

"The end of the day," Sue thought, 
raising her face to meet Charles kiss. 
"And the beginning of so much." 



Free Spectacles. 

It is sad to think that people in Scotland 
are going hungry, yet in the last ten 
months the Health Department had issued 
450,000 pairs of spectacles to the public 
absolutely free, and that after a high-class 
technical test. " For I was an hungered 
and ye gave me no meat, but thank good 
ness ye gave me spectacles". There is some 
thing lop-sided and twisted in the control 
of a democracy that will let its people go 
hungry, and yet be able to find money to 
provide them with free spectacles! 




Bright men are in demand in the busi 
ness world. They are needed to think up 
new reasons for lifting prices. 



Ski-ing enthusiasts will be interested in 
this photo of Jane Wyman, Warner 
Bros star, appearing in "Johnny 
Belinda." Note the snow-white jumper 
in cable stitch with polo neck and 
chocker trimming of dinky red golly- 
wogs which she made herself. The golly- 
wog idea is carried out on her waist belt. 
Just that little bit of unusual etcetera 
which lifts an outfit right out of the 
ordinary. 







MARYS 

BAKING 
POWDER 

(IN THE NEW RED AND WHITE LABEL.) 



Use Aunt Mary s Baking Powder according to instructions 
in any recognised Recipe or Cookery Book. 

Ask for AUNT MARY S Pure Food Products. 



14 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 




Liberty designers express, in Liberty 
corsets and brassieres, the beauty of line which 
any woman may possess, whatever Ker 
natural figure characteristics may be. 

This supreme interpretation of figure 
beauty means that Liberty corsets and bras 
sieres will give you the smooth, graceful flow 
from bust to knee, which, with ample freedom 
of movement, are the outstanding features of 
Liberty garments. 



I ID ED TV 

LID ball 



CORSETS m BRASSIERES 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



15 



PARTY TWOSOME 



Baby will look adorable if dressed 

Materials: 6 ozs. of baby wool, 3-ply; 1 pair 
each of No. 10 and 11 knitting needles; a 
medium-sized crochet hook; 9 small buttons; 
li yds. of ribbon. 

Measurements Frock: Length from 
shoulder, 15 ins.: width all round under the 
arms, 22 ins.; sleeve seam, 2 ins. Coat: 
Length from shoulder, 10$ ins.; width all 
round under the arms, 24 ins.; sleeve seam, 
7 ins. 

Tension: 8 sts. to 1 in., measured over the 
moss st. 

Abbreviations: k., knit; p., purl; sts., 
stitches; rep., repeat; tog., together; si., slip; 
p.s.s.o., pass slipped stitch over; m., make; 
inc., increase; dec., decrease; patt., pattern; 
beg., beginning; ins., inches. 
Frock. 

The little dress has a delicate diamond- 
patterned skirt with contrasting yoke and 
sleeves in moss stitch. 

Back. 

With No. 11 needles cast on- 163 sts. and k. 
1, p. 1 alternately across row, working into 
the backs of the k. sts. only. Next row: p. 
Now work in patt. as follows: 1st row: k. 2, 

* m. 1, si. 1, k. 1, p.s.s.o., k. 3, k. 2 tog., m. 1, 
k. 1; rep. from * to last st., k. 1. 2nd and 
alternate rows: p. 3rd row: k. 3, * m. 1, si. 1, 
k. 1, p.s.s.o., k. 1, k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 3; rep. 
from * to end. 5th row: k. 4, * m. 1, si. 1, 
k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., m. 1, k. 5; rep. from * to 
last 7 sts., m. 1, si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., m. 1, 
k. 4. 7th row: k. 3, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 1, 
m. 1, si. 1, k. 1, p.s.s.o., k. 3; rep. from * to 
end. 9th row: k. 2, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 3, 
in. 1, si. 1, k. 1, p.s.s.o., k. 1; rep. from * to 
last st., k. 1. llth row: k. 1, k. 2 tog., m. 1, 

* k. 5, m. 1, si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., m. 1 ; 
rep. from * to last 8 sts., k. 5, m. 1, si. 1, 
k. 1, p.s.s.o., k. 1. 12th row: p. These 12 




in this little set of softest wool. 



rows form one patt. Continue in patt. 
until work measures 10 ins. from beg., 
ending with an llth row. Next row: 
p. 5, * p. 2 tog.; rep. from * to last (5 
sts., p. 6. Now work 1 in. in k. 1, p. 1 
rib, then change to No. 10 needles and 
work in moss st. for 1 in. 



Armhole Shaping. 
Cast off 3 sts. at beg. of next 4 rows, 




then dec. 1 st. at both ends of next 3 alternate rows. Con 
tinue without shaping until work measures 1.5 ins. from beg. 
Next row: Moss st. 21, cast off 27, moss st. to end. Work 4 
rows in moss st. on last set of sts. Cast off. Join wool to 
neck edge of sts. for other side, then work 4 rows in moss st. 
Cast off. 

Front. 

Work as given for back until the yoke measures 2$ ins. 
above waist ribbing, ending with a wrong side row. 
Neck Shaping. 

Next row: Moss st. 31, cast off 7, moss st. to end. Con 
tinue on last set of sts., but cast off 4 sts. at beg. of next 2 
alternate rows, then dec. 1 st. at same edge on next 2 alter 
nate rows. Continue without shaping until work measures 
15 ins. from beg. Cast off. Join wool to neck edge of sts. 
for other side and work this to match first. 
Sleeves. 

With No. 10 needles cast on 71 sts. and work 1 in. in moss 
st. Now shape top by casting off 3 sts. at beg. of next 4 
rows, then dec. 1 st. at beg. of every row until 51 sts. remain, 
after which dec. 1 st. at both ends of every row until 21 sts. 
remain. Cast off. 

Sleeve Bands. 

With No. 10 needles cast on 8 sts. aiid work 1 in. in 
moss st. Cast off. 

Coat Back. 

With No. 11 needles cast on 115 sts. nnd work in patt. as 
given for frock for 5} ins., ending with an llth row. Next 
row: p. 4, * p. 2 tog., p. 2; rep. from * to last 3 sts., p. 3. Change 
to k. 1. p. 1 rib and work over the first 19 sts. for 1 in., end 
ing with a right side row. Break wool and leave these sts. 
on a spare needle. Work over the next 1!) sts. in the same 
way, then work over the next 12, after which work over the 
next 19 sts., and the last 19 sts. Do not break wool after 
working last set of sts., but change to No. 10 needles an<l 
work in moss st. across all sts. Continue in moss st. for 1 in. 

[Turn to page 29."] 



16 



Australian Home Journal, August I 



^Dressmaking, 
JHadt asy 




Be competent to cut and make perfect fitting 
clothes for every figure. Sar-e money and know 
the joy of wearing perfect fitting garments. 

PERSONAL AND POSTAL 
LESSONS BY EXPERTS 

Our schools are known everywhere for our suc 
cessful graduates, and our methods endorsed by 
leading Fashion houses throughout the British 
Empire. Be sure of the best tuition. 

LESSONS ARE SIMPLE AND 
INEXPENSIVE 



r 



MAIL COUPON TO NEAREST BRANCH 

McCab Academy 



1 Kindly mail me, without obligation, your Free 
| Booklet about Dressmaking, for which 1 enclose 1 
I 2 id. stamp. 



Name 



Address 

Are you interested in Postal Lessons? 




McCABE ACADEMY of DRESSMAKING 

THE FOREMOST AND LARGEST SCHOOL OF FASHION. 

Sydney: Canberra House, 295 Elizabeth St., Box 2424. 

Melbourne: Manchester Unity Bldg.. -Svranston and Collins Sts., Box 330C 

Brisbane: Penny s Buildings, Adelaide St. Entrance, Box I816W. G.P.O. 

Perth: National House, William St.. Box 482. 

Adelaide: Shell House, North Terrace, Box 5I9E. 

South Africa: Shakespeare House, Commission St., Johannesburg. P.O. Box 5811. 




"ITS SUCH A 
RELIEF TO HAVE 
NO TROUBLE 
WITH TEETHING . . " 

Try giving your baby 
Ashton 8c Parsons Infants 
Powders, which are wonder 
fully soothing at teething 
time. These Powders en 
sure regular, easy motions, 
promote restful sleep, and 
are absolutely SAFE! 

Box of 20 Powders, 1/6 



ASHTON & PARSONS 
INFANTS POWDERS 



Green: "My wife threatens to leave me 
unless I give up golf. 

Brown: "By Jove, that s awkward." 
Green: <f Yes, I shall miss her." 



There was the Scotsman who painted a 
sign on his gate: "No Hawkers or Canvass 
ers Admitted." But on second thought he 
added: "Except with samples." 




YOU CAN NOW QUICKLY LEARN TO 

PLAY THE 

PIANO 



If you have ever wanted to be able to 
play the piano, then here Is yonr oppor 
tunity to learii quickly by means of 
remarkable English system. 

You may never have touched a piano befor*. 
It makes no difference. No matter how HttU 
you may know about music no matter if you 
do not know one note from another, you can 
quickly learn to play by the new, rapid Crapho- 
note System. 

You need no knowledge whatever of music 
or notes in order to be able to read music by 
the Graphonote System and to play it. 

If you have already tried to learn the piano 
In the ordinary way with wearisome scales, 
exercises and tedious practice the new Grapho 
note System uill come as a positive revelation 
to you. 

In England, where the Graphonote System 
originated, over ten thbusand people most of 
whom had no previous knowledge of music 
have learned to play by means of this revolu 
tionary system. 

NO "DRUDGERY" 

The Graphonote System is indeed revolu 
tionary. In the past it took years of prnr.tlc* 
to wtore the player s mind with "mental pic 
tures" of the notes so that they could be easily 
found on the keyboard. With the Graphonot* 
System the "mental pictures" of the notes r 
already provided. They are clearly before your 
eyes. Years of drudgery are thus at one strok* 
eliminated. 

PLAY STANDARD MUSIC 

When playing by the Graphonote System you 
read from real standard "five-line" music th 
sort that is recognised by musicians all th 
world over. 

The Graphonote System provides the most 
rapid and natural method of mastering ordinary 
standard music. !t should not in any way b 
confused with "patent," "trick" or "number" 
systems or other similar "dead end" makeshifts. 
Those who learn by such systems never master 
the standard musical notation and are lost when 
later they are confronted with a sheet of ordin 
ary music. 

The more you play by the Grarptttmote System. 
on the other hand, the more familiar you become 
with standard musical notation. 

YOU LEARN AT HOME 

By the Grap ionote System, which consists of 
a course of carefully graded postal lessons, you 
learn privately in your own home. It does not 
matter where you live, you can learn anywhere. 
You learn in your own time at your own con 
venience, without anyone present to embarrass 
you. If you make a slip "Graphonote" show* 
you at once where you are wrong. 

ILLUSTRATED BOOK FREE 

You want to be able to play the Piano 
well here is your opportunity. What thousand* 
of others HAVE DONE you too CAN DO. 

The Graphonote System is described in 
booklet entitled: "A New Way to Learn th 
Piano at Home." This booklet if FREE. Simply 
send your name and address NOW and let u 
post you a copy at once. 

ST. JAMES SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

(Dept. 77), 66 King St., Sydney. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 




Frock, 7320 1 S . 6d. 

2 yds. 54 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Smart Dressers. 

Joan Crawford is one of the most 
perfectly groomed worn^n in Holly 
wood film circles .she is meticulous 
over every little detail of her dress 
ing and thns rightly pains the title 
of being one of Hollywood s best- 
dressed women. Joan chooses the 
smartest clothes, wears them with 
an air and is always perfect in every 
detail from top to toe. 

It has been a study that has paid 
her profitable dividends, for she has 
gone to the top of her profession 
.since she started in filmland as an 
over-dressed, over-anxious extra. 

Ingrid Bergman is another of 
Hollywood s best-dressed women 
yet she is akin to .loan in only one 
way. She selects far less spectacular 
styles, does not follow fashion 
slavishly. But her grooming is as 
meticulous as .Miss Crawford s. 



Frock, 7408 1 S . 6d. 

yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins 




Suit, 7237 1 S . 6d. 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Long sleeves, | yd. extra. V 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. * 




Frock, 7401 

4 yds. 36 ins 

Sizes 32 to 4 



Wool for Spring. 

Complete success of wool 
as a spring fabric has been 
established in Paris this 
season and the bevy of dia 
phanous wools produced by 
French manufacturers 
especially for spring and 
summer collections have 
proved a revelation. 

Gossamer wool chiffons and 
gauzes, some of them daintily 
pin-spotted and polka- 
dotted, have been hailed with 
delight by leading designers. 
and Paris designer, Pierre 
Balmain, chooses palest 
shell pink wool chiffon for 
an afternoon frock in ihe 
garden party tradition. 



10d 





[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not he accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Svdnev. N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern. ld. extra.} 




Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



Design for youth is the theme of Paris 
, mid-season collections presented by lead- 
\ ing designers with wool fabrics starring for 
everything from blouses to swim-suits. 

Cowslip Yellow. 

In pale cowslip-yellow crepe, Pierre 
Balmain makes a charmingly youthful 
frock with a full skirt topped by a fitted 
buttoned bodice embroidered with circles 
of drawn-thread work and finished with a 



starched white collar folding back in wings 
on either side of the pointed neck-line. 
Among the highlights too is a Jacques 
Fath swim suit, impeccably tailored in 
spinach-green wool gabardine with jetted 
pockets on either hip. 

Another fashion for the young girls is a 
full ankle-length skirt of navy wool worn 
with a trim blouse in red and white checked 
delaine with a demure white collar and 
cuffs, while short-sleeved sweaters in 
narrow stripes of pink and 
gold or black and gold worn 
with long skirts are in favour 
for evening too. 




Frock, 
304 1 S . 6d. 

yds. 
4 ins. wide. 



Frock, 7406 1s. 6d. 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Topper, 11,482 11 d. 
yds. 54 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 

Bridal Displays. 

This Spring some of our leading stores 
plan to have a bridal display, following 
the lead that has been set by English 
and American firms. One invitation 
bridal fashion show in the salon was com 
plete with organ music, white flowers and 
tapers, and eyen a couple of giant wed 
ding cakes, which later were served to 
the guests, drew wide-eyed interest of 
brides-to-be and their mothers. 

Prices ranged from 10 to 90, and 
interest obviously was strongest in the 
budget items. For example, a pink 
marquisette dance or bridesmaid s 
dress, topped by a pink pique waistline 
jacket, priced at 10 ; a green and w.hite 
printed organza formed gown as cool as 
a mint julep and retailing at 11/13/4. 
and a full-skirted white organdie, with 
eyelet bands, over ynllow taffeta, an 
other bridesmaid s number, priced at 
13/10/-, were some of the pieces which 
were loudly applauded. 

Bridal outfits, intimate bridal ap 
parel, etc., were shown, with a complete 
range of trousseau for the bride. 

Matron s Frock, 7328 1s. 10d. 
/ 2f yds. 54 ins. wide. Sizes 34 to 48 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
f-fnmp fniirnal." 407-409 Kent Street. Svdnev. N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, Hrf. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



19 



Old Time Woollens. 

This season old-time woollens are cropping up 
with names that must be unfamiliar to the 
goneratioas of today. Largely responsible for 
heir return are the men s wear fabric houses 
which are bidding for women s wear business 
1 hey bring into the fashion vocabulary woollen 
names which should have appeal. So if you see 
light-weight woollens in a variety of pleasing 
colours you will recognise them as old friends 
masquerading under names that assist the manu- 
t facturors or repeat orders. This class of fabric 
twin ho popular right up to midsummer. 



mm 









Peplum Frock, 

c i. 7//w 7313 1s. 6d. 

g* 7 * 04 - 1s - * d 3i yds. 54 ins. wide. 

4|yds 36ms wide. Contrast: 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. | yd . 54 ms wkk 

Paris Modes. Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 

Capturing the imagination of the young Parisienne, checks make 
fashion nows. with tartans in red and green, dark blue and green or 
yellow and black and rod featured for dresses and skirts, while small 
shepherd s plaid makes a light-hearted Maggy Rouff model with a 
draped shawl collar, buttoned bodice and skirt fullness drawn to the 
left hip, states a special message received by the Australian Wool 
Board. 

Pretty Fashions. 

Other pretty fashions include effective little skull caps in wool 
crochet, some embroidered and others worked in alternating rows of 
contrasting colour. Incidentally, wool embroidery strikes the 
newest fashion note for the younger set and a typical example is seen 
in a frock of black and white shepherd s plaid made with a full skirt 
and patch pockets on. either hip, gaily embroidered with field flowers 
in thick wools. Making use of old scraps of wool, clever French 
women are embroidering similar motifs to refurbish last season s 
dresses, using several strands of the thinner wools together. 



Coat and Hood, 
7310 1 S . 6d. 
3f yds. 54 ins. wide 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Maternity Frock, 

7234 1 S . 6d. 
*i yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated.^ Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal." 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 



20 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 




NOV/I /I 

""/i 

Make your 
buttons this 




covered 

ea.^v way 



BUTTON MOULD 



Here s good news for the home 
dressmaker. A new, simple way 
to make your own buttons to 
match any frock. And look at all 
these advantages. You can re 
cover the Jiffy Button Mould an 
often as you like. Any type of 
material can be used. It only 
takes a few minutes to prepare a 
complete set of buttons and 
they cannot come apart in use. 

Atk to see them at your store now. 



I. Cover dome 
with material. 



2. Fold material ovei 
rim of dome and in 
sert back-plate, then 
insert locking-ring. 



CANNOT COME APART IN USE 



3. Button complete. 



If any difficulty in obtaining 
writ* the manufacturers: 

AUSTRALIAN BUTTONS & 

BUCKLES PTY. LTD., 

40 Dawson Street, SYDNEY. 

Telephone: MX 1149. 




HANDY 8IZB8 
3* 3* 45 



MADE IN 4 

No. 22 

Sl appro*, j" |" |" \l" 

Prire ixr 

picket: I/lid l/8d J/1J 1/4.1 
Content*: IDoz. IDoz. IDoi. JUo*. 

Regd. POSTAGE PAID 



A soft collar hint . . . 




Prevent the 
five o clock 
collar collapse by 
lightly starching col 
lars with Robin Starch. 
Robin is the easy starch 
that gives the expert finish. 



ROBIN 

Starch 



"Give us back the old days with low 
wages, for we were better fed, happier, and 
better tempered. Above all, we had our 
freedom. Now we are half-starved and 
worried to distraction." British newspaper. 



Some men are born clever. Others believe 
anything their wives tell them. 



Those who bring sunshine into the lives 
of others cannot keep it out of their own. 



Nevgr wglct a 

Mister 




The smallest injury can 
become infected. Never 
take a rhanre! 

Always use B AMD-AID ad 
hesive bumluge, (he ready- 
made dressing for all minor 
injuries. 

IIS PACKETS OF 12 FOR 
8d. OR FAMILY SIZE 24 
FOR I/ 3d. at all chemist* 
and stores. 



THE PERFECT 
READY-MADE 
DRESSING 




PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNS01 

WORLDS LARGEST MANUFACTURERS 
OF SURGICAL DRSSINGS 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



21 



Pinafore Frock, 
9077 1 S . 3d. 
4, 6, 8 years. 

v Blouse, 1 yd. 36 ins. wide. 
Frock, 1- yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9078 1s. 3d. 

2 and 4 years. 
1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9007 1 S . 3d 
6 and 8 years, 
yds. 36 ins. wide 




Frock, 

9053 1s. 3d. 

10 and 12 years. 

^- yds. 54 ins. wide 



For Afternoon Wear. 

Afternoon dresses call for 
attention as necklines descend 
ever lower. They are often 
magnificently scooped out and 
partly filled again with chiffon, 
lulle, lace or silk. 

With others the neckline is* 
a deep V. 

livening dresses make a 
{Treat deal of use of softly 
Mowing chiffon for a classical 
silhouette. 

Stiff brocades and satins 
are the most popular materials 
for full-skirted hall gowns or 
pre-1914 "hour-glass" dresses 
that mould the figure and swing 
out at the hem-line. 



The New Season. 

Colour forecast for the com 
ing season neutral shades of. 
grey, hiscuit, cafe-au-lait, 
" washed - out " pastel 
colours, bronze, green and 
a lot of navy. 

Hats will be smaller 
than ever and based on 
the cloche., fitted tightly to the 
head and often with a sideways 
slant. 

There will, however, be some 
flattering wide-brimmed straws 
for summer. 

Fabrics will include Uedford 
cord, face cloth. tropical 
weight barathea. grosgrain, 
tweeds and jersey 



Frock, 9028 Is. 3d. 

1 to 2 years. 
U yds. 36 ins. wide. 




Frock, 9005 1s. 3d. 
2 and 4 years, 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 

" * -- TT i > > *ni 4f\n v . {. , c..j_-, K.T c \rr ;->,.* ,., D-,,,,,,-,, llxJ ov tm 1 



22 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 




B e r I e i 



The Brassiere to Flatter 

the woman who cares 

The new "Contro-Bra" is fashioned by Berlei 
to fit four different bust fittings . . . medium, 

medium full, full and deep. 
All of these "Contro-Bras" have much in common 

. . . they give flattering support and subtle 
fhaping to heavier bustlines . . . they re "Longer-line" 

for diaphragm and waist control . . . with 
elastic waist-release gussets for perfect comfort . . . 

some have smoothing, built-up shoulders . . . 
til are made in long-wearing nude batiste, with upper 

cups of strongly lined, embroidered net. 
Shoulder straps are strong and adjustable. 

Berlei "Contro-Bra" Brassieres launder splendidly and 
are moderately priced from 21/6 to 31/6 (approx.). 




Fine Figure Foundations 

M.I8 




. .. for a long and colourml life 



FORD PILLS 

are the gentle, tasteless, 

painless laxative for all 

your family. 

FORD PILLS 

are liked by Hospitals for 

patients before and after 

operations. 

FORD PILLS 

help remove the toxins that 

often cause your rheumatic 

aches and pains and 

headaches. 

Get Ford Pills 

In handy plastic tubes, 

2 6 everywhere 



F.P.8 




A lot of motor accidents are the result 
of eager drivers recklessly hugging the 
wrong curves. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



23 




Jacket Suit, 

9019 1 S . 6d. 

16 to 18 years. 

32 inches bust. 

3 yds. 

36 ins. wide. 




Coming Down. 

Cotton prices will be reduced 
shortly. In both Sudanese and 
Egyptian cotton there has been a 
reduction announced by the Raw 
Cotton Commission in Liverpool. 
This will affect dress goods and 
shirtings. The vagaries of the 
market are strange. It was not so 
long ago the great shortage in 
cotton was publicised. 

Crepe Dresses. 

A need for cool but versatile soft 
crepe basic dresses in the better 
budget category is expressed l>y a 
number of small specialty shops. 
Up to now these stores have done 
so much on their polka dots, color 
ful prints on gay grounds, or spaced 



bouquets on dark grounds that basic 
crepes have been relatively unim 
portant. They report more calls- 
recently for dark simple basics. 

Fabrics Forecast. 

Fabrics cited "in work" for spring" 
showing, quality worsted jerseys, 
companion fancy and plain prestige 
woollens for costumes, new crisp 
novelties including satin brocades 
with colourful figures, reps with 
silk-wool mixture, faconne novelties 
of taffeta family. Pure dye crepe 
for versatile figure line dresses. 
Satin alone and as contrast to dull 
face fabrics. Distinguished little 
patterns in supple 
thin worsted for 
walking dresses. 




Suit, 9945 1s. 6d. 
16 to 18 years. 
32 inches bust. 

yds. 
54 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9084 1 S . 3d, 

12 and 14 years. 
2| yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9020 1s. 3d. 

10 and 12 years. 
2 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Contrast : 
| yd. 36 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9051 1 S . 3d. 
\ 10 and 12 years. 



54 ms. wide. 
[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 



24 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



Men s 
Sports 
Shirt, 

9494 1 S . 3d 
2* yds. 
ins. wide. 
Also sizes 10, 
14 years. 



A Look Ahead. 

Watch out for those particularly smart and sophisti 
cated prints especially appealing for town dresses 
amusing young prints for children and juniors dainty 
fresh designs of interest to be featured in the new 
season. 

In the city prints there is one outstanding allover 
print that arrests interest through its deep but spark 
ling colours, which include a combination of bottle 
green with yellow and rose. 

Another pattern, effective in a combination of warm 
taupe with lime and rose. Also outstanding is a colour 
scheme of lime yellow with grey, white and turquoise 
blue and rose. 



While some of these prints are conversational 
in their themes, the tendency is away from this 
type to simple geometric ideas done with a new 
twist and in novelty colour effects. * 

Another notable fabric feature for spring 
and summer is a pique seersucker which boasts 
of a new construction with mat-like surface. 
The ehalky white seersucker gives the impres 
sion of being finely shirretl and then pique 
waled in colours that include royal with black, 
yellow with black, jade 
with black, red with black. 



Suit, 9033 1s. 3d. 

1 to 2 years. 

Shirt, | yd. 36 ins. wide 
Pants, | yd. 36 ins. wide 




Suit, 9483 1s. 

2, 4, 6, 8 years. 
Shirt, IA yds. 36 
Pants, 1 yd. 36 ins. wide. 




Safari Suit, 9068 1s. 3d. 

4, 6, 8, 10 years. 
Jacket, 1 yds. 54 ins. wide. 
Pants, f yd. 54 ins. wide. 



Pyjamas, 9003 1 S . 3d. 

2 and 4 years. 
2 yds. 36 ins. wide. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal." 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \%d. extra.} 



Australian riome Journal, August I 



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SKIN DISEASES , 

For Free Advice on all Skin Diseases " 
1 send 2d. stamp for Examination 

Chart to 

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H National Bank Building, 

a 271-9 Collins St., Melb., C.I. F6822 



Minister: "The collection on Sunday 
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garments/ " 



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JOHNSON 



26 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 




Paul Regan, livoli. 



The Play and Film 



At long last the "Miranda" film 
has been released, at the Embassy. 
A Harley Street doctor goes 
on a fishing trip and catches a 
mermaid, who seizes him by the 
legs and swims away with him. 
He recovers consciousness in the 
mermaid s cave. Miranda is a 
real live mermaid and very beau 
tiful. She calmly proposes that 
the medico will take her to Lon 
don. He does so and has some 
wonderful explanations to offer 
his wife. Miranda has a gay 
time in London and plays havoc 
with male admirers. The film 
breaks new ground and is a big laugh 
because of its absurdity and joyous gaiety. 
Eventually it is the doctor s wife who dis 
covers the truth about Miranda. From the 
Encyclopedia Brittanica she learns a more 
homely definition of mermaids. Indeed, it 
is her subsequent description of her guest 




as a "sea cow" that greatly expedites 
Miranda s return to the ocean. In the 
cast: Glynis Johns (in the name part), 
Googie Withers, Griffith Jones, John Mc- 
Callum, Margaret Rutherford, David Tom- 
linson, Yvonne Owen, Sonia Holm. 
* * * 

"Sorrowful Jones," at the Prince Edward, 
is not a sad story, as its name would seem 
to imply. Bob Hope, with his assistant, 
Eegret, runs an S.P. betting shop in New 
York. Although against the law, he man 
ages to make a living, just as thousands of 
S.P. men do in Australia. A crooked race 
combine adopts stand-over methods with 
the betting shops, demanding money for 
protection. As a side-line they dope horses 
and tip the betting shops when the horses 
are really running. Sounds homely. A 
little girl (Martha Jane) is left with Jones 
as security that her father will come back 
with money for a bet; but her father is 
killed by the betting crooks and Sorrowful 
takes the kiddie home. The Big Bad 
Eacing Crook assigns a horse to Sorrowful 
so as to throw off clues, and the horse is 
registered in the name of Martha. And 
when the Dope King wants the kid back 
because as the horse owner she has a hold 
on him, Sorrowful won t hand her over. 




Film star Jane Russell, who hopes to visit 
Australia shortly. 



"That Wonderful l/ree" Mavfair. 
Later the racket 
eers are arrested. 
Sorrowful s penu 
rious past is for 
given by the girl 
of his dreams, who 
promises to marry 
him, and they will 
adopt Martha Jane. 
Cast: Bob Hope, 
Lucille Ball, Mary 
Jane Saunders, 
William Demajr- 
est, Bruce Cabot. 
* * * 

The producer 
sums up the story 
values of "To the 
Victor," at the 
Plaza, aside from 
its lofty over 
tones, as an account of "two people who 
are faced with the decision of whether 
they should participate in helping to re 
store a good world against their personal 
interests." The two people are, of course, 
Miss Lindfors in the role of a Swedish 
girl once charged as a collaborationist, 
and Denis Morgan as the American veteran 
who was in the battle of the Normandy 
beachhead and stayed on in Paris. The 
film was made for the French and other 
Europeans just as much as for Americans, 



British, etc. They will know what is a 
real background and what isn t. This time 
they won t be disappointed. It is really 
the Champs Elysees and the Eiffel Tower 
and Montmartre streets and Normandy 
villages in and around which Morgan and 
Miss Lindfors perform. Not only were all 
the exteriors filmed in France, but some 
of the interiors, most notable of which is 
Parisian courtrooms. A fine dramatic and 
interesting production, full of thrills, that 
holds the audience spellbound. 

* * * 

Oliver Wakefield, B.B.C. comedian, billed 
as "The Voice of Inexperience," and 
appearing in Tivoli Theatre s "Starry 
Nights" revue, was born in South Africa 
but went to England at the age of 17, 
studied at the Eoyal Academy of Drama 
tic Art and began his theatrical career in 
Shakespearean roles. His comedy act was 
evolved some years later aboard the ship 
taking him back to South Africa on holi 
day. The new style of humour scored well 
with passengers, and since then Oliver 
Wakefield has found it more profitable to 
make people laugh than to make them cry. 
His act has been successful in every 
entertainment medium screen, cabaret, 
non-stop variety, radio, recording and tele 
vision. 



June Allyson, who plays Jo 
in M-G-M s Technicolor film, 
"Little Women," at the Lib 
erty, has worthy predecessors 
in the role. Katharine Cornell 
played Jo in her first London 
stage appearance in 1919, 
while Katharine Hepburn 
appeared in a Hollywood pro 
duction back in 1933. Alice 
Brady played Meg in 1912 in 
the William A. Brady Broad 
way stage production of 
"Little Women." Janet Leigh 
plays her here. 

* 

"Annie Get Your Gun" is 
still showing to crowded houses 




Mother is a Freshman," Regent. 

at the Theatre Eoyal, and although the 
play has been running for many months 
past, there is not the slightest diminution 
in attendances. The Melbourne record is 
sure to be broken. 

* * * 

Most interested spectator at the big 
wedding scene in which Gary Grant slips 
a ring on Ann Sheridan s finger in 20th 
Century-Fox s "I Was a Male War Bride" 
was Betsy Drake. "This is something I 
wouldn t want to miss," smiled the actress, 



Australian Home Journal, August I, 1949 



27 



"if only for the opportunity to stand in 
the background and hiss." Although Grant 
and Miss Drake have been reported to be 
altar bound, they have not as yet set a 
date for a marriage. 

* * 

"Mother is a Freshman" (Regent). Any 
thing can happen when a pretty young 
widow (Loretta Young) decides to take 
advantage of her grandmother s unusual 
scholarship bequest and joins her second- 
year student daughter in the co-ed Pointer 
College. The stuffy family lawyer (Rudy 
Valee), who wants to marry her, strongly 
objects. She enrolls in an English litera 
ture class to meet Professor Michaels 
(Van Johnson), of whom her daughter is 
enamoured. Unaware of a romance that has 
developed between the professor and her 
mother, the daughter snubs the campus 
hero an awful offence. The big college 
dance is the climax, when mother and 
daughter make a scene and daughter 
charges mum with stealing her man! There 
is a regular how-de-do, a shindy, a wordy 
scruffle, a bickering. Daughter charges 
mother with duplicity, and 
the latter decides to leave 
the dance and start pack 
ing for home. She has had 
more than enough. 
Daughter, having worked so 
much havoc, relents, and 
before Ma can catch the 
train there is a reconcilia 
tion and an understanding. 
Mum goes back to the dance 
with her professor and 
daughter makes up with 
the college hero. Others in 
the cast: Barbara Law 
rence, Eobert Arthur, Betty 
Lynn. 

* * * 

At the Mayfair, "That 
Wonderful Urge" hops 
along at express speed. A 
grocery heiress goes to Sun 
Valley for a vacation, and 



to believe the marriage is 
just a canard invented by 
the irate damsel. Then fol 
lows all kinds of crossfire 
fighting, ending in a first- 
class libel action. Incidents 
succeed in rapid succession 
and in a tempestuous at 
mosphere; but both come to 
realise they are in love and 
melt into each other s arms. 
Principals: Tyrone Power, 
Gene Tierney, Reginald 
Gardiner, Arleen Whelan, 
Lucile Watson, Gene Lock- 
hart, Lloyd Gough, Porter 
Hall. 

* * 

Physical directors in 
Hollywood studios have 
launched a series of annual 
selections to be called "He- 
Men of the Year," and for 
1948 they chose William Bendix, Victor 
Mature and Errol Flynn as the strongest 
gents in pictures, based on exploits of the 





a newspaper reporter follows her 
information for some hot articles 
writing about her life and loves 




"Miranda" Embassy. 

enjoys herself in the company of her aunt. 
The press man proceeds to make a play 
for the lovely heiress; they see a great 
deal of each other, and she believes him 
to be the one man in the world who is not 
after her money. Newspaper publicity 
reveals that the reporter is the man who 
is doing her unwanted biography. She is 
furious; he takes safety in flight. She 
follows him and spreads a story about 
being married to him and has settled a 
fortune on the embarrassed biographer. 
He is fired by a digusted editor, who refuses 



"Little W omen" Liberty. 
to get s t arg j n fii mg produced during the year, 
he ^ is They decided that William Bendix should 
"he b e picked for having trounced a pair of 
l.eavies in "The Life of Riley," 
and for belting a baseball out 
of Yankee Stadium during 
filming of "The Babe Ruth 
Story"; that Victor Mature 
should be chosen for his ex 
ploits as Samson in "Samson 
and Delilah"; and that Errol 
Flynn rates mention for extra 
ordinary feats of sword play 
in "The Adventures of Don 
Juan." 

* * 

Robert Taylor and Ava 
Gardner played their big 
romantic scene in Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer s "The Bribe," 
and the result was a kiss that 
lasted five hours. By the time 
the scene was completed from 
all angles long-shot, medium- 



shot, close-up and over the shoulders of 
both participants twenty-seven kisses 
were required for what will be one kiss on 
the screen. 

* * * 

Gary Grant is currently undergoing 
Hollywood s most complicated make-up 
procedure for his current role in 20th 
Century-Fox s "I Was a Male War Bride." 
Since suffering a yellow jaundice attack 
while on location overseas for the romantic 
comedy, in which he is teamed with Ann 
Sheridan, the actor had had minor recur- 



"Sorrowful Jones" Prince Edward. 
rences of the ailment. Whenever the 
jaundice returns hia skin tones, on face 
and hands, change to a saffron hue, whicli 
gradually fades out as the 
attack disappears. 

* * 

Laurence Olivier is help 
ing another young member 
of the "Great Expectations" 
cast along the road to fame. 
First it was Jean Simmons, 
when he cast her as Ophelia, 
and now it is 18-years-old 
John Forrest, to whom he 
has given an important part 
in his forthcoming London 
stage production of the 
New York success, "A 
Street Car Named Desire." 
John, who plays the pale 
young gentleman in "Great 
Expectations," will be seen 
with Jean again in "Adam 
and Evelyne," a new com 
edy in which she co-stars 

with Stewart Granger. 
* * * 

Designer Molyneaux, who has created a 
[Turn to page 40.] 




To the Victor" Plaza. 



28 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 




X *%r^ : ll:f r i%?. i the iy breeze 

\ ^ i> ^^ Th* perishing caddies cough and sneeze, 
s i^Ji ry-^" Until the shivering golfers, too, 
rv" 1 S Retreat from the risks of cramp and flu. 
** ac k to ^ e c u bhouse they gaily go 
To sip the solace all golfers know; 
And glowing warmth in "a spot" they fine 
With Woods* Great PepperniMt Care combined. 




with Meds 

safe internal protection 

Women who long to try new-fashioned protection 

will find the new "small-diameter" Meds 
Slender the perfect way to begin. 

But whether you try New Meds Slender 
or New Mods Regular (for greater security) you 

will enjoy internal protection at its best. 
Next-time try Meds and ask for Meds 
Slender or Meds Regular. 



In boxes of TO 

With or without 
applicators 





THE MODESS TAMPON 

PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 



Rheumatism 



An English Re 
search Chemist has 
discovered that Uric 
Acid has nothing 
to do with the pain, 
swelling, and stiff 
ness of Rheumat 
ism. 





Mr. Doaglat Canon s 
revolutionary discovery 
has opened the way to 
one of the most remark 
able offers ever publicly 
made to Rheumatic suf 
ferer*. 



Rheumatic- toxins are first 
produced in the deep vein* 
of the lega, and are then 
carried by the blood to 
every part of the body, re 
sulting In (1) sluggish cir 
culation ; (2) congestion ; 
and (3) pain ami swelling. 

THE TRUE CAUSE OF RHEUMATISM 

Is a toxic condition of the blood originat 
ing in the deep veins of the leg. These 
toxins cause the stiffening of the muscle 1 * 
and the hardening of the joints by be 
coming localised in certain parts of tho 
body and there producing exactly the 
hume sort of inflammatory thickening of 
the tissues as results from a boil. 

To remove the cause, whether Muscular Rheu 
matism, Neuritis, Sciatica, Arthritis, or Syno- 
vitis, it is necessary to (I) relieve the pain; 

(2) eliminate the poisons from tke blood; and 

(3) build up the Nervous System. Mr. Douglai 
Curzon s new development scientifically com 
bines and provides these essentials, and by its 
speedy, safe, and certain action not only defin 
itely assists in banishing the pain, swelling, and 
stiffness, but builds resistance against futur* 
attacks. 

FREE TREATMENT 

Send the form at the foot of this announcement 
and receive: 

(1) A supply of Analgesic Tablets to give in 
stant relief in every case of Muscular Nerv* 
or Arthritic Rheumatism. These tablets 
are guaranteed to be absolutely harmless, 
relieving Rheumatic Pains wherever situ 
ated. 

(2) A supply of Rheumatoxin Eliminant. This 
scientific combination tones up the liver, 
Ftomach, and digestive organs. By its 
direct action on the blood it quickly and 
safely reduces swelling and stiffness. 



"Your treatment has done my husband a 
wonderful lot of good. He can walk five 
miles now; and, before taking your treat 
ment, he couldn t walk one mile; so I can 
highly recommend your treatment for 
Rheumatism." E.H.B.. Wilson, S.A. 

"I am very pleased to be able to say that I 
am free from pain after 12 months sH-fferin<j 
with muscular Rheumatism in the neck." 
A.E.D., Orroroo, S.A. 



APPLICATION FORM 

The Controller, * 

Anglo-Australian Laboratories, 

26 Hunter St. (Box 4242XX), Sydney. 

Please send me the supply of Analgesic 

Tablets and Rheumatoxin Eliminant 

promised free of charge and obligation. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

(Print in Block Letters and enclose 2Jd. 
stamp for return.) AHJ 8/49 



Australian Home Journal, August I, 1949 



29 



PARTY TWO-SOME 

[From page 15."] 
Armhole Shaping. 

Cast off 3 sts. at beg. of next 4 rows, 
then dec. 1 st. at both ends of next 3 
alternate rows. Continue without shaping 
until work measures 10$ ins. from beg. 
Cast off. 

Bight Front. 

With No. 11 needles cast on 67 sts. and 
k. 1, p. 1 alternately across row. Next row: 
p. to last 8 sts., rib 8. Now work in patt., 
but keeping the 8 border sts. in rib, until 
work measures 5$ ins. from beg., ending 
with an llth row. Next row: * p. 2, p. 2 
tog.,; rep. from * to last 11 sts., p. 3, 
rib 8. Next row: Kib 8, turn and work 1 
in. on these sts., ending with a right side 
row. Leave these sts. on a spare needle 
and work over the next 22 sts. in the same 
way, then work over the last 23 sts. as 
before. Change to No. 10 needles and work 
in moss st. across all sts. to last 8, rib 8. 
Work 4 rows in moss st., still keeping the 
8 border sts. in rib, then make a button 
hole on next row. Next row: Kib 3, take 2 
tog., m. 1, rib 3, moss st. to end. Continue 
to make buttonholes 1 in. apart until there 
are 3 in all, but when 1 in. of moss st. has 
been worked above waist ribbing and end 
ing at armhole edge, shape armholes as 
follows: 

Armhole Shaping. 

Cast off 3 sts. at beg. of next row and 
next alternate row, then dee. 1 st. at same 
edge on next 3 alternate rows. Continue 
without shaping until 3rd buttonhole has 
been worked, then work bdck to front 



end of neck edge, then work in dc. across 
second shoulder. Work front shoulders 
and neck in the same way, but make 3 
loops on each shoulder to form button 



holes. Sew on buttons. Sew in sleeves of 
coat, then sew up side and sleeve seams. 
Sew on buttons. Thread ribbon through the 
slots at waist. 



Neck Shaping. 

Next row: Bib 8 and si. these sts. on to 
a spare needle, cast off 4 sts., moss st. to 
end. Work back to neck, then cast off 4 
sts. at beg. of next row and 2 sts. at beg. 
of next 2 alternate rows at neck edge. 
Continue without shaping until work meas 
ures 10| in*, from beg. Cast off. 
Left Front. 

Work as given for right front, but with 
all shapings at opposite edges and omit 
ting buttonholes in border. 
Sleeves. 

With No. 11 needles cast on 45 sts. and 
work li ins. in k. 1, p. 1 rib. Change to 
No. 10 needles and moss st., but inc. 1 st. 
at both ends of the 13th row and every 
following 4th row until there are 67 sts. 
Continue without shaping until work meas 
ures 7 ins. from beg. Now shape top by 
dec. 1 st. at beg. of every row until 55 sts. 
remain, then dec. 1 st. at both ends of 
every row until 31 sts. remain. Cast off. 
Neck Band. 

Join shoulder seams, then with right 
side of work facing you and using No. 11 
needles, rib the 8 border sts. of right front, 
pick up and k. every st. round neck edge, 
then rib the 8 border sts. of left front. 
Work next row in rib, but taking every 
3rd and 4th st. tog. along cast-off edges, 
but not shaped edges of work. Work 4 
rows in rib without shaping. Cast off. 
Making-up. 

Press work on wrong side. Place front 
shoulders of frock over the 4 rows of back 
and catch down at armhole edge. Sew in 
sleeves, then sew up side and sleeve seams. 
Sew bands to sleeve edges, easing in the 
fulness of sleeve at centre. With the right 
side of work facing you work 1 row of dc. 
across one back shoulder, then continue 
round neck edge as follows: * 1 dc. into 
next st., 4 ch., 1 dc. in same st., 1 dc. in 
each of next 2 sts. of edge; rep. from * to 



ROCK-A-BYE COT COVER 



Only a tiny head will be visible as Baby sleeps peacefully beneath the folds of this 
enchanting coverlet. The simple eight-row pattern forms an attractive diamond design. 



Materials: 9 ozs. blanket wool; 1 pair 
of No. 5 knitting needles; a fairly large 
crochet hook; 3 yards of 1-inch ribbon; 1 
yard of 2i-inch ribbon. 

Measurements: Length, 25 ins.; width, 
21 ins. 

Tension: 5 sts. to 1 inch in width. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; sts., 
stitches; rep., repeat; si., slip. 
To Make. 

Cast on 100 sts. and k. 2 rows, then work 
in pattern as follows: 

1st row: K. 2, * si. 2, k. 2; rep. from * 
to last 2 sts., k. 2. 

2nd row: K. 2, * p. 2, si. 2; rep. from * 
to last 2 sts., k. 2. 

3rd row: K. 



4th row: P. 

5th row: K. 2, * k. 2, si. 2; rep. from " 
to last 2 sts., k. 2. 

6th row: K. 2, * si. 2, p. 2; rep. from " 
to last 2 sts., k. 2. 

7th row: K. 

8th row: P. 

These 8 rows form one pattern. Eep. 
them until work measures 23j ins. from 
beg. K. 2 rows, then cast off. 
Making-up. 

Press work. Work 1 row of double 
crochet all round edge, working 3 double 
crochet into each corner to keep work flat. 
Bind edge with the narrow ribbon. Tie 
the wider ribbon into a bow and sew to 
one corner. 




Handbags. 

Handbags are smaller than they have 
been for many seasons. The majority are 
decorated with elaborate clasps in lacquer 
work, tooled gold, or studded with precious 
stones. 

The latest accessory for your handbag 
is a tiny perfume bottle in the form of a 
heart, or you may fancy Marcel Eochas s 
flat handbag flask in pastel-coloured glass 
covered with black Chantilly lace. 

At least, that is what they are saying in 
Paris. 



Rice. 

The vagaries of rice are past finding out. 
In New South Waes it is unobtainable, 
and unless you visit a Chinese restaurant 
you will forget what it tastes like. You 
can still, of course, get it on the black- 
market if you like to pay the price; but 
even that is very hush-hush. 

In Victoria rice can be bought on the 
open market, and in England rice is re 
appearing in the shops and is being 
enthusiastically welcomed by housewives. 



Australian Home Journal, August I, 1949 



THERE S MORE TO 



THI$ than 
meets the 




uppose you had to choose between fine 
new curtains for the lounge and a Life 
Assurance policy which would you 
take? Beauty for the home and comfort 
for the present; or protection for a future 
that seems a long way off. Would you 
weigh pros and cons and admit, "There s 
more to this than meets the eye"? 

For Life Assurance is the one insti 
tution which makes systematic saving 
easy. It is the one institution which 
provides full benefits in the event of 
early death. No system of individual 
saving and investment can hope to give 
such complete protection, no matter how 
carefully it is followed. 

But that is only part of the story. Life Assurance not only 
protects you all through life, it makes money for you. These 
profits are added to the sum for which your husband is 
assured and are known as "bonuses". They are additions 
which increase the value of his policy from year to year . . . 
they are the material "plus" in his policy. 

THREE MILLION POLICYHOLDERS SEVEN AND 

A HALF MILLION AUSTRALIANS, ., .BENEFIT BY 

LIFE ASSURANCE 



HIGHLIGHT 
Y01 itllAftlt 




To keep ttie beauty 
of shining hair . . . 

for children and adults there 
is nothing more beneficial to 
the hair than reqular care wfth 
Barry s Tri-c o p h-e ro us. This 
treatment he ps prevent falling 
hair, dandruff, premature grey- 
ness, brittl* hair, itching scalp. 

^.BARRY S 

jri-coph erous 

FAMOUS HAIR TONIC 
Sold by all Chemists & Stores 

___ _^^_ BS/57 



Amazingly 

FAST 



from 



HEADACHE 



with 



BAYERS 
ASPIRIN 



Tablets 



24. fori S 
100 for 4 - 



"These new fashions are absolutely freak 
ish," said Mr. Eogers. "Every time I look 
at that new hat of yours it makes me 
laugh." 

"That s splendid, darling," said his wife. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



31 



PRA: 




Materials: 8 ozs. baby wool, 3-ply. Coat 
takes 5 ozs., leggings 3 ozs. Knitting 
needles, No. 11. Elastic to fit waist. 4 
buttons. 4 press-studs. A medium-size 
crochet hook. 

Measurements. Leggings: Front seam, 
7 ins. Leg seam (inside to seam across 
foot), 9 ins. Width across widest part, 25 
ins. Coat: Length from shoulder, 13$ ins. 
Width all round at underarm, 26 ins. Sleeve 
seam, 6 ins. 

Tension: 8 sta. to the inch, meas 
ured over st.-st. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; in., inch 
or inches; p., purl; St., stitch; sts., 
stitches; st.-st., stocking-stitch: k. 
on the right side and p. on the wrong; 
g.s., garter-stitch: plain knitting in 
every row, 2 rows make one ridge of 
knitting; wtn., wool twice round 
needle; wft., leave wool in front of 
work; s., slip; p.2.s.s.o., pass the two 
slipped sts. over; rep., repeat; tog., 
together; wfd., wool forward; p.s.s.o., 
pass the slipped st. over; inc., in 
crease or increasing; dec., decrease 
or decreasing; beg., begin or begin 
ning; pat., pattern. 

The Leggings. 

Cast on 188 sts., and work in k. 2, 
p. 2 ribbing for 6 rows. 

Next row: K. 2, * wtn., p. 2 tog., 
k. 2, p. 2, k. 2, rep. from * to last 2, 
p. 2. Continue in ribbing for a 
further inch, then shape back thus: 
Eow 1: K. 104. Turn. Eow 2: S. 1, 
p. 18. Turn. Bow 3: S. 1, k. 30. 



FOR THE SIX- TO 
TWELVE-MONTHS OLD. 



Turn. Continue in st.-st. upon these 94 sts., 
dec. at each end of every alternate row 
until 42 sts. remain. Work 10 rows of 
st.-st. without shaping, then shape foot 
thus: 

Eow 1: K. 2, * wfd., k. 2 tog., k. 2, rep. 
from * to end. Bow 2: K. Bow 3: K. 18. 
Turn. Bow 4: K. 14. Turn. Work 34 rows 
of g.s. on these 14 sts. Now dec. at each 
end of the next and every following alter 
nate row until 8 sts. remain. Break off 



Bow 9: K. 26 (k. 2 tog.) twice, k. 30, 
(k. 2 tog.) twice, k. 8. Bow 10: K. Bow 
11: K. 25, (k. 2 tog.) twice, k. 28, (k. 2 
tog.) twice, k. 7. K. 2 rows, then cast off. 

Eejoin wool at inside edge of the 94 sts. 
which were left and k. to end of row. Con 
tinue as for first leg until the ribbon holes 
have been worked. K. the next row. Next 
row: K. 38. Turn. Next row: K. 14. Turn. 
Work 34 rows of g.s. on these 14 sts., then 
dec. at each end of every alternate row 
until 8 sts. remain. Break off wool. Eejoin 
wool at the inside edge of the 4 sts. which 
were left and k. 4. 

Next row: K. 4, k. up 18 sts. along side 





Turn. Eow 4: S. 1, p. 42. Turn. Bow 6: 
S. 1, k. 54. Turn. Bow 6: S. 1, p. 66. Turn. 
Continue in the above manner, working 12 
sts. more before each turn, until you have 
worked s. 1, p. 162. Turn and k. all sts. 

Continue in st.-st. for a further 6 ins., 
finishing on a p. row. Next row: K. 94. 



wool. Rejoin wool at the inside edge of 
the 24 sts., and k. to end. 

Next row: K. 24, k. up the 18 sts. along 
side of foot, k. across the 8 Bts. from toe, 
18 sts. across the other side of foot, and 
k. the 4 sts. which were left (72 sts.). 
Work 8 rows of g.s. 



of foot, 8 sts. across toe, 18 sts. along other 
side of foot, and the remaining 24 sts. 
Work 8 rows of g.s. Bow 9: K. 8, (k. 2 
tog.) twice, k. 30, (k. 2 tog.) twice, k. 26. 
Bow 10: K. Bow 11: K. 7, (k. 2 tog.) twice, 
k. 28, (k. 2 tog.) twice, k. 25. K. 2 rows, 
then cast off. 

Making-up: Oversew front and side 
seams. Sew up foot seams. Pass elastic 
through slots at waist. Crochet two chains 
each 16 ins. long and finish each end with 
a tassel. Pass these through slots at ankles. 
The Back of Coat. 

Note: Please read abbreviations before 
starting coat. Cast on 171 sts. and work 
in g.s. for 7 rows. Continue in pat. thus: 

Bow 1: S. 1, (k. 1, p. 1) twice, wft., 
k. 1, s. 2, k. 1, p.2.8.8.o., k. 1, wtn., p. 1, 
k. 1, p. 1, rep. from * to last 2, k. 2. Bow 
2: S. 1, * (p. 1, k. 1) twice), (p. 2, k. 1) 
twice, p. 1, k. 1, rep. from * to last 2, p. 1, 
k. 1. Bep. the last 2 rows 3 times. Bow 9: 
S. 1, k. 2 tog., * k. 1, wtn., (p. 1, k. 1) 3 
times, p. 1, wft., k. 1, s. 2, k. 1, p.2.s.s.o., 
rep. from * to last 12, k. 1, wtn., (p. 1, 
k. 1) 3 times, p. 1, wft., k. 1, s. 1, k. 1, 
p.s.s.o., k. 1. Bow 10: S. 1, * k. 1, p. 2, 
(k. 1, p. 1) 3 times, k. 1, p. 2, rep. from * 
to last 2. k. 2. Eep. the last 2 rows 3 
times. These 16 rows form one pat. Con 
tinue in pat. until work measures 8 ins. 
from the cast-on edge, then shape body 
thus: 

Next row: K. 1 (k. 2 tog.) 85 times (86 
sts.). 

Change to all st.-st. for 10 rows, then 
shape armholes by casting off 4 sts. at the 
beg. of the next 2 rows and dec. at each 
end of the following 5 rows (68 sts.). Con 
tinue in st.-st. without further shaping, 
until work measures 13 ins. from the cast- 
on edge, then shape shoulders by casting 
off 6 sts. at the beg. of the next 8 rows. 
Cast off remaining sts. [7uni to 



32 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 





Middle Age. 









The identifying mark of middle age is 
largely a matter of contour or of bulk. The 




Anothtr Cad bury Kecipe to 




silhouette of twenty-five placed over the 




win their praises 




silhouette of forty will show striking de 
viation in the lines. 




^^^ass^i^^^i^^^ 




At age 25, Miss Blank, an average young 




j^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^m^_ 




woman, fully grown, 5 feet 4 inches in 




,-"^~ ffl|^^ ^^^^^P^Wri^^aSk 




height, weighs 128 pounds; at 40 she 




/^^^^^JBjHK^^^^pWo^^^^^^yBi^^BK:^ 




weighs 138 pounds; at 50, 144 pounds. 


J 


t *"^^Tm! HB^^^^I^^^^^^^mlifflKL 




This gain over age 25 is practically all fat, 




^^al^^^^^B^^fe^j^^aHE^^^^^^I^^^ii: If 




and its distribution has sadly changed 




/" ; ; ^NliSelll** *$^ fSilH^^uiMlylJi^^SlBlJB^yflB^ 




Miss Blank s silhouette. 




^^BBKfePf ^^^^^^^g^^3K5^^^i^^^y 




Most people have a vague idea that we 




^^^B^S^B^T^^^Ps^^^^^^*"" -t^^ 




were "intended" to grow stouter as we 




^*^ ^ ^ftf^ ^ ^ 




grow older and that the decreasing activ 




^^^Tin ii_ -^ j ^-n****^ 




ity of maturity as compared to youth is 




CHOCOLATE SPOIGE ROLL 




natural to this time of life, forgetting, 
however, that the surrender of activity is 
usually the result of slowly developing 




(IFi f/i lemon or Orange Butter Filling) 




physical sluggishness. 




4 ozs. S.R. flour. 4 ozs. sugar. 




The work of the body is done by muscle 




1 tablespoonful Bournville Cocoa. 




cells and the cells of organs. It is for 




3 eggs. Pinch of salt. 




these working cells that the bulk of food, 




Lemon or orange butter or honey. 




especially the fuel food, is required, to 




1J tablespoons hot water. 




keep the little cell engines going. A lim 




Method: Line a Swiss roll tin with greased paper. Whisk 




ited amount of repair food is required to 




i he eggs and sugar together till thick and fluffy (about 20 




keep them in condition. To call upon the 




minutes). Sift flour, cocoa and salt. Fold into eggs 




heart to do work in support of excess 




lightly, mixing as little as possible. Pour hot water care- 
hilly down side of bowl. Mix quickly ; pour into tin, 
running the mixture into the corners ; don t spread with 
knife. Bake 10-15 minutes in fairly quick oven. Turn on 
ro slightly damp towel. Strip off paper. Cut off outside 




fatty tissue is like running a business with 
a pay roll far beyond the needs of the 
business. Not only the heart but the liver 
and kidneys are called upon to do needless 




edges quickly. Roll up and allow to stand 1 minute. 




work. 




Unroll, transfer to sugared paper, spread with orange or 




We do not decry exercise but always 




lemon butter, roll and dust with sugar, or ice with chocolate 




bear in mind that it is diet more than 




icing. 




exercise that is really going to keep for 




Food and drink from the one packet that s Rournville Coeoa\ 




you the silhouette of youth. For you to 




In your Cooking, Gidbury s Bournville cocoa adds a new 




exercise strenuously, if you are stout and 




deliciousness ... a new tempting colour. As a daily drink 




if your heart muscle is below par, or if 




there s nothing to compare with the real chocolaty taste 




your blood pressure is probably above 




and nourishing goodness of Bournville Cocoa. It s so 




normal, and your circulation over-bur 




economical too . . . "120 cups to the Ib." and now onlv 




dened, is only adding to your trouble and 




1/7* a half pound * <Jn Metrnpolitan Areas.) 




exposing yourself to grave risk. 




(Sfajhuty** 




Eye Hints. 


N 


BOURNVILLE COCOA 




A well known singer has said: "If I 
want my eyes to look really their best I 
try to lie down in a room and completely 
relax for 10 minutes. Cotton-wool pads 
dipped in eye lotion and placed on your 








closed lids help after a tiring day." 
For weak eyes, bathing in cold water 






INSTANTLY REDUCE 


and opening the eyes under water is 
strengthening. Eye baths with special eye 
lotion morning and night will also help to 
prevent their looking tired. Use a weak 




solution of boracic powder and boiled 


Your Waist 


water or a reliable make of eye lotion. 


t> \JR - -/ Jtm --^i^M ^^^ ^^ ~ ^ ^^* *^ ^* 

BSlk<iilliBPi; . ... 


The people who suffer most from strikes 


Ivt^l and Hips 


are women and children. Mother has to 
manage somehow, while father lays down 


Iwi ; IB 


hjs tools and fights for an alleged "prin 


E|||| f You will look and feel younger and smarter wearing a FIGURE 


ciple"; but it is the wife who is the burden- 


fRf /r^^X < I CONTROL CORSET. Its gentle changing pressure will slim 


bearer, who has to keep the home together 


HRf!/ . | | your hips and waistline, and beautify your figure with every move 


with very little to keep it on. Before any 


% J^,;|iji^: J you make. Gives natural balanced support and soothing control. 


strike is entered on there should be a 


HKWrT? iy Made of superfine fabrics, and is individually fashioned for every 


ballot among the strikers womenfolk. 


l v W 


There would only be one answer: "No 


W/T^&A^B FIGURE CONTROL has these improvements : 1. Cross-over pull-front 

^?r*Vr OIX ,UT-^-4k*M -. .. i.* * , 


strike." 




Residents of Sydney and 
Suburbs are invited to 
accept a free trial fitting 
of the FIGURE. CONTROL 
CORSET. Call when in 
town, or telephone MA5308 



no busks or lacing. 2. Stretch-controlled elastic inserts. 3. Simplified front 
fastening, instantly adjustable for reduction. 4. Spiral boning for freedom, 

flexibility, figure loveliness. 

7 Days Trial 

You can try the Figure Control Corset for 7 days AT MY RISK, to prove It 
will give comforting support and uplift, and lovely, slim, youthful grace and 
energy to your figure. 

The FIGURE CONTROL CORSET con be supplied by post to country 
and interstate res/dents. Write now for free illustrated Booklet 
and Measurement Form. Mention this paper. 

MISS FLORENCE BRADSHAW, 

FIGURE CONTROL CORSET CO., 

5th Floor, P.A. Building, 
243 ELIZABETH STREET, SYDNEY. 



A perplexed father was concerned as to 
a career for his son. So he sent him to a 
room which contained nothing except a 
table on which there was an apple and a 
Bible and a one pound note. His idea was 
that if the boy ate the apple he would 
make him a farmer; if he real the Bible 
a parson, and if he pocketed the money a 
stockbroker. 

When the father entered the room 
shortly afterwards, he found the boy sit 
ting on the Bible, eating the apple and 
with the pound note sticking out of his 
pocket. 

He therefore naturally decided that his 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



33 



THE GENTLE LOOK 



. .Materials: 4 oza. knitting cotton equal to 
about Ne. 20 in thickness; 2 No. 12 and 2 
No. 14 knitting needles; 2 No. 10 knitting 
needles (for casting on); 4 No. 12 knitting 
needles with points both ends; 6 buttons; 
3$ yds. ribbon velvet. 

Measurements: Length, 20 ins.; bust, 34- 
35 ins.; sleeve seam, 7 ins. 

Tension: 8 sts. to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; sts., 
stitches; tog., together; rep., repeat; nl., 
slip; m. 1, make 1; g.st., garter stitch 
(every row k.); patt., pattern; p.s.s.o, pass 
slipped stitch over; cont., continue; dec., 
decrease; inc., increase; ins., inches. 




Back and Front Alike. 

With No. 10 needles, cast on 112 sts. 
Change to No. 14 needles and work 4 rows 
in g.st. Work in patt. thus: 1st row * 
k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 2. Rep. from * to end. 
Rep. this row until work measures 3 ins. 
Change to 2 No. 12 needles and cont. in 
patt. inc. 1 st. at both ends of next row 
and every following 8th row until there 
are 136 gts. Cont. straight until work 
measures 12$ ins. 

Shape Armholes: Dec. 1 st. at both ends 
of alternate rows until 112 sts. remain. 
Leave sts. on a spare needle and work a 
second piece in the same way. 
Sleeves. 

With 2 No. 12 needles, cast on 128 sts. 
and work in patt. as back for 6 ins. 



Shape Top: Dec. 1 st. at both ends of 
alternate rows until 104 sts. remain. Leave 
sts. on a spare needle and work a second 
sleeve in the same way. 
Yoke. 

Slip first 56 sts. of back on a spare 
needle pointed at both ends; with the No. 
12 needles pointed both ends cast on 6 
sts., then on to same needle k. across re 
maining 56 sts. of back, work across sts. 
of one sleeve thus: * k. 5, k. 2 tog., k. 6. 
Rep. from * to end (96. sts.), with 2nd 
needle k. sts. of front, with 3rd needle 
work across sts. of second sleeve thus: 

* k. 5, k. 2 tog., k. 6. Rep. from * to end 
96 sts.), then k. remaining 56 sts. of back 

from spare needle. 

Work in rows, beg. and ending at 
centre back (the extra needles may 
be discarded when the back opening 
is long enough to allow the sts. to be 
placed on one needle). Work 5 rows 
in g.st. 

**Next row K. 6, si. 1, * k. 1, m. 
1, k. 2 tog., si. 2. Rep. from * to last 
10 sts., k. 1, m. 1, k. 2 tog., si. 1, k. 6. 
Next row K. 6, si. 1, * k. 1, m. 1, 
k. 2 tog., cotton forward, si. 2, cotton 
back. Rep. from * to last 10 sts., k. 
1, m. 1, k. 2 tog., cotton forward, si. 
1, cotton back, k. 6. ** Work 2 rows 
in g.st. Make a buttonhole in next 
2 rows thus: Next row K. to last 
4 sts., cast off 2, k. 2. Next row 
K. 2, cast on 2, k. to end. Work in 
patt. thus: 1st row K. 5, * k. 2 
tog., m. 1, k. 15. Rep. from * to last 
9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 2nd row 
K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 2, p. 13. 
Rep. from * to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., 
m. 1, k. 7. Rep. last 2 rows twice 
more. 7th row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 
1, k. 7, si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., k. 5. 
Rep. from * to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., 
m. 1, k. 7. 

8th row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, 
k. 2, p. 11. Rep. from * to last 9 sts., 
k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 9"th row K. 5, 
* k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 13. Rep. from * 
to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 
Rep. last 2 rows twice more, then 
8th row again, making a buttonhole 
above previous buttonhole in llth 
and 12th rows. 15th row K. 5, * k. 
2 tog., m. 1, k. 6, si. 1, k. 2 tog., 
p.s.s.o., k. 4. Rep. from * to last 9 
sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 16th row 
K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 2, p. 9. Rep. 
from* to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, 
k. 7. 17th row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., 
m. 1, k. 11. Rep. from * to last L> 
sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. Rep. last 2 
rows twice more, then 16th row 
again. 23rd row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, 
k. 5, si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., k. 3. Rep. from 

* to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 3, cast 
off 2, k. 2. 

24th row K. 2, cast on 2, k. 1, * k. 2 
tog., m. 1, k. 2, p. 7. Rep. from * to last 9 
sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 25th row K. 5, 

* k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 9. Rep. from * to last 
9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. Rep. last 2 rows 
twice more, then 24th row again, omitting 
the cast-on of buttonhole in 24th row in 
the repeats. 

31st row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 4, 
si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., k. 2. Rep. from * 
to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 32nd 
row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 2, p. 5. Rep. 
from * to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 
33rd row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. Rep. 



from * to end. Rep. last 2 rows twice more 
then 32nd row again, making a bnttohole 
in 35th and 36th rows. 39tk rw K. 5, * 
k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 3, si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o., 
k. 1. Rep. from * to last 9 ts., k. 2 tog., 
m. 1, k. 7. 40th row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., 
m. 1, k. 2, p. 3. Rep. from * t last 9 sts., 
k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 41st row K. 5, * k. 2 
tog., m. 1, k. 5. Rep. from * t last 2 sts., 
k. 2. Rep. last 2 rows twice more, then 
40th row again. 47th row K. 5, * k. 2 
tog., m. 1, k. 2, si. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.o. Rep. 
from * to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 3, 
cast off 2, k. 2. 48th row K. 2, east on 2, 
k. 1, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 2, p. 1. Bp. from 

* to last 9 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 7. 49th 
row K. 5, * k. 2 tog., m. 1, k. 8. Bep. 
from * to last 4 sts., k. 4. Rep. last 2 rows 
twice more then 48th row again, omitting 
the cast-on of buttonhole in 48th row in 
the repeats. Change to No. 14 meedles. 
Next row* k. 10, el. 1, k. 2 tog., p.s.s.0., 
k. 9. Rep. from * to last 2 sts., k. 2 (122 
sts.). Work 5 rows in g.st. Now rep. from 
* to **. Work 4 rows in g.st., making a 
buttonhole in first 2 rows. Cast off. 

Sleeve Borders (make 2). 
With No. 14 needles, cast on 82 sts. and 
work 6 rows in g.et. Next row K. 1, si. 
1, * k. 1, m. 1, k. 2 tog., si. 2. Bep. from 

* to last 5 sts., k. 1, m. 1, k. 2 tog., si. 1, 
k. 1. Next row K. 1, si. 1, k. 1, m. 1, 
k. 2 tog., cotton forward, si. 2, cotton back. 
Rep. from * to last 5 sts., k. 1, m. 1, k. 2 
tog., si. 1, k. 1. Work 4 rows in g.st. Cast 
off. 

Make Up. 

Press work lightly on wrong side with 
hot iron and damp cloth. Join sleeve top 
shapings to armhole shapings om front and 
back. Join side and sleeve seams. Sew 
sleeve borders to sleeves, gathering fulness 
in centre. Sew on buttons to match but 
tonholes. Thread ribbon at neek, base of 
yoke and sleeve edges. 



White Bread. 

As showing how acute the food position 
in Britain still remains, white bread is quite 
unobtainable. To the men and women of 
the old land it is only a memory. Millions 
of British children have never tasted it. 
One writer in a British paper very appeal- 
ingly says: "Let the subsidised dingy war 
time loaf still be available for all who want 
it. But let those wh0 prefer white bread 
have the chance of buying it, unsubsidised, 
at the full economic price. 

"There would be a substantial saving in 
the cost of the subsidy and there is real 
need for saving on food subsidies. They 
make some things cheaper, but we pay for 
them every time we buy a packet of cigar 
ettes or a glass of beer." 

The British Government s idea is to 
supply the people with false teeth and 
spectacles, free doctors and medicine, 
before urgently needed foodstnffs. 



A schoolmistress riding in a bus saw a 
man opposite whom she thought she re 
cognised as the father of one of her pupils, 
and she spoke to him. He responded with 
a stony stare, and she then recognised she 
had made a mistake. The other passengers 
tittered, and to justify herself, she said: 
"I am sorry, but I really thought you were 
the father of one of my children." 



SUBSCRIBERS! PLEASE NOTE. 

When renewing subscription* kindly 
state month of commencement. PRINT 
name and address (including State) 
clearly. Always quote receipt number 
when corresponding. 



34 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 




. 

Makes it 
really white 




Reckitt s 
Blue 



Out of the blue comes the whitest wash" 



Many a woman thinks she can do nothing 
without a husband; then when she gets one 
she finds she can do nothing with him. 



The greatest mistake you can make in 
this life is to be continually fearing you 
will make one. 




BRITISH-MADE 

BEBARFALD-YICKERS 
BUREAU SEWING MACHINES 



A truly magnificent 
machine. The English Vickers Head 
sews both backwards and forwards. 
Other special features include Auto 
matic Bobbin Winder. Stitch Adjuster 
and Tension Control. Handsome 
Bureau Cabinet, as illustrated, in light 
Maple colour. 

-- CUT AND MAIL THIS COUPON - 
BEBARFALDS LTD., 
Cnr. George & Park Sts., SYD\EY 
Please forward full details of the "Bebarfald- 
Vickers" Bureau Sewing Machine, with details 
of your Specialised Easy Terms. 



NAME _ ........ 

ADDRESS 



___-*. H.J. 



BEBARFALDS 

OPPOSITE SYDNEY TOWN HALL 



Oktm 



For the relief of 
Tonsillitis, Laryn 
gitis, Mumps, 
Bronchitis, 
always use 

WAWN S 

WONDER 

WOOL 




ARE YOU OVERWEIGHT? 

To be overweight is both unhealthy and un 
lovely makes you look years older I Get rid 
of it by my perfect method. No dieting no irk 
some exercises. The sum of !/!/- covers the 
whole cost, no further expense. Result guaran 
teed, no matter how long-standing the fat con 
dition. Send 6d. in stamps for full particulars to 
MATRON MARION GOSS, Dept. J, 
Box 32, P.O., North Sydney, N.S.W. 

Let us be of good cheer, remembering 
that the misfortunes hardest to bear are 
those that never come. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



35 



VERSATILE POTATOES 



portion thickly round a block of cheese. 
Dip in beaten egg and coat with crumbs. 
Fry in hot fat till a golden brown. 



Potatoes go round the clock in a health 
ful budget diet. For breakfast, hash- 
browned or fried with eggs, or in potato 
pancakes or griddle scones. For luncheon, 
in chowder, soup and as nests for left-over 
vegetables and meat or eggs. At dinner, 
again in soups, as the main vegetable, or 
iu the dessert. Their variety is endless 
always good, always good budget value. 

Mashed Potato Nests with Peas and Bacon. 
(Illus.). 

Nine medium potatoes, J cupful milk, 1 
tablespoonful margarine, 12 slices bacon, 
2 eupsful cooked peas, 1 tablespoonful mar 
garine. 

Cook potatoes in salted water; mash. 
Beat in milk and 1 tablespoonful mar 
garine. Continue beating potatoes until 
they are light and fluffy. If too dry, add 
more milk to mashed potato. Cook bacon 
slices until done but not crisp. /Line 6 
heat-resistant glass deep pie dishes with 
bacon, using two slices in each dish. 
Arrange mashed potatoes in nests in deep 
pie dishes. Fill mashed potato nests with 
peas. Dot peas with margarine. Bake in 
moderate oven for about 15 minutes. 



Lemon Pudding. 

Two tablespoonsful table fat, $ tea- 
spoonful salt, | cupful sugar, 1 cupful 
smoothly-mashed potatoes (no seasonings 
or milk added), 2 egg yolks, $ cupful milk, 

1 teaspoonful grated lemon rind, 1$ table- 
spoonsful lemon juice, 2 egg whites. 

Cream together fat, salt and half of the 
sugar. Mix in potatoes. Beat egg yolks 
until thick and lemon coloured. Add to 
potato mixture with the milk, lemon rind 
and juice. Beat egg whites until nearly 
stiff, add remaining sugar and beat until 
glossy. Fold meringue into potato mix 
ture. Dip into custard cups and place in 
hot water in baking dish. Bake in moder 
ately slow oven 40 to 50 minutes or until 
firm and browned. One and a half tea- 
spoonsful lemon juice plus 3 tablespoonsful 
orange juice may be used in place of 1 
tablespoonsful lemon juice. 

Potato Puffs. 

Two cupsful mashed potato, 2 table- 
spoonsful butter, 2 eggs, } cupful milk, salt 
and pepper. 

Stir the butter into the potatoes; add the 
eggs, beaten until foamy, and then the 
milk. Season to taste with the salt and 
pepper. Beat well and drop by spoonsful 

2 inches apart on a greased slide. Bake in 
a quick oven until brown, and serve hot. 

Potato and Egg Scramble. 

Four tablespoonsful dripping, 1 medium 
onion (sliced), 4 medium potatoes (thinly 
sliced), 3 or 4 eggs (beaten), 1 teaspoonful 
salt, pepper. 

Heat fat in a heavy frying pan with a 
cover. Add onions and potatoes and cook, 
covered, over a moderate flame, stirring 
occasionally, till potatoes are almost ten 
der, about 15 minutes. Eemove cover and 
brown potatoes, stirring often. Add eggs, 
salt and pepper and cook, covered, till 
eggs are set. 

Hearty Potatoes. 

Put alternate layers of raw sliced pota 
toes, creamed corn and bacon slices, in 
radiating spokes, in a casserole. Season. 
Repeat. Pour on milk nearly to top. Bake 
in moderate oven 1$ hours. 



Ginger Cake. 

Four ozs. of flour, 2 ozs. of oatmeal, 3 
ozs. of potatoes (boiled and hot), 1 egg, 
2 teaspoonsful of baking powder, 1 oz. of 
dripping, 1 tablespoonful of treacle, 1 tea- 
spoonful of ginger. 

Place the flour and oatmeal in a basin, 
put a sieve over, and rub through the pota 
toes. Mix all well together, add the baking 
powder and ginger, and again mix well. 
Place the treacle and dripping in a small 
saucepan, and warm them over a slow 
fire until the dripping has melted. Beat 
the egg and add it. Pour all into the basin, 
stir well and place the mixture in a 
greased tin. Bake in a moderate oven for 

hour. 



Casserole of Sweet Potatoes and Apple. 

-Boil 6 large sweet potatoes, peel and 
slice. Pare 4 apples and slice. Arrange a 
layer of potatoes in the bottom of a greased 
casserole. Over these a layer of apple. Dot 
with butter, sprinkle with brown sugar 
and a faint touch of mace. Then proceed 
with the remainder of the potatoes and 
apples, giving each double layer the sugar- 
and-butter treatment. Mix \ cupful of 
hot water with $ cupful of honey and pour 
over the apple and potatoes. Bake in an 
oven until the syrup is thick and the apples 
are tender. Maple syrup may take the 
place of honey; and if you use the maple, 
dilute it with less water, say i water to 
} syrup. 




Victory Sponge. 

Grate one large raw potato and 2 medium 
raw carrots; mix in 1 breakfastcupful of 
breadcrumbs, 1 breakfastcupful self-rais 
ing flour, 2 tablespoonsful sugar, $ tea- 
spoonful flavouring, such as vanilla or 
lemon. Thoroughly stir in 1 teaspoonful 
baking powder. Put 2 or 3 tablespoonsful 
of jam in a heated basin, run it round to 
cover the inside. Cool. Put in the pudding 
mixture, tie on a cover of greased paper, 
steam 2 hours. 

Cheese and Potato Blocks. 
Small blocks of cheese about 1 inch 
square, mustard, 6 large potatoes, i oz. 
margarine, 1 egg; egg, breadcrumbs and 
hot fat. 

Spread the little cheese blocks with mus 
tard, steam the potatoes and rub them 
through a sieve. Add the margarine and 
bind into a paste with the egg. Season 
well. Divide into portions and wrap each 



Potato Hash. 

Combine and blend $ cupful cooked, diced 
potato, J cupful cooked, diced onions, 
I cupful diced green pepper, 2 cupsful 
cooked, diced meat. Then beat together 1 
cupful left-over gravy, J cupful tomato 
puree, 1 tablespoonful margarine. 

Add meat and potato mixture, season 
with salt and pepper to taste and 1 tea- 
spoonful Worcestershire sauce. 

Pour into greased casserole or individual 
baking dishes and bake until browned in 
moderate oven, or heat over hot water. 
Before baking, the top may be sprinkled 
with a mixture of equal parts of grated 
cheese and bread-crumbs. 



Nut and Potato Balls. 
One Ib. of cold, cooked potatoes; 1 
tablespoonful of chopped onion; 1 table- 
spoonful of chopped parsley; 2 ozs. of 
margarine; 2 ozs. or more of mixed, 

[Turn to page 36.1 



36 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



these 4 luscious 




centres 



"CREAM CARAMEL" 



STRAWBERRY CREAM" 



TURKISH 

DELIGHT" 



"FRUIT 
SUNDAE 




No less than twelve separate chocolates in every 
-lb. block that s what "Snack" gives you! Three 

each of those four motith-watering centres and 
every one lavishly coated with Mac. Robertson s 

nourishing full-cream milk chocolate. So ask 
for "Snack" for your sweet tooth. 



Mode by 



The Greaf Name in Confectionery 




VERSATILE POTATOES 

[From page 35.] 

chopped nuts; salt and pepper; a few 
almonds (blanched, skinned, and 
shredded). 

Mash the potatoes and heat them in * 
saucepan with the margarine, parsley, 
onion and seasoning, adding a little milk 
if necessary. Beat this mixture over the 
fire until it is quite smooth. When it is 
heated through, shape it into neat balls. 



Potato Soup. 

Three-quarter Ib. potatoes, 1 oe. butter, ] 
dessertspoonful prepared barley, seasoning. 
$ pint milk, 1 pints hot water, 2 onions. 

Peel the potatoes and onions and slice 
thinly. Melt the butter in a saucepan and 
add the potatoes and onions. Cook for 5 
minutes. Add the seasoning and water 
and boil slowly for 35 minutes. Euli 
through a sieve and return to the sauce 
pan with the barley mixed with the milk 
and heated. Simmer for another 10 min- 
utea. % 

Meat stock may be used instead of 
water. 



Potato Biscuits. 

One Ib. of hot mashed potato, 2 dried 
eggs, 1 oz. of margarine, 1 teaspoonful of 
salt. 

Beat the eggs thoroughly, and 
add them to the hot potato with the 
margarine and salt. Mix to a stiff paste, 
using a little potato water if necessary. 
Koll out on a floured board to the thick 
ness of ^ inch, and cut into little biscuits 
with a sharp cutter. Eoll it very lightly, 
or it may stick to the board. Bake on a 
greased slide in a very hot oven till nicely 
browned, and eat hot. These are not ea 
to make at first, for they are brittle, btn 
with a little practice they can be handled 
successfully, and they are so delicious 
that they repay a little trouble. 



Correct Walking. 

Watch people walking into any public 
place, such as a restaurant or a wedding 
reception, where they feel they are under 
observation. 

To walk well it is essential to have good 
shoes which fit perfectly; but there should 
be no tottering on heels of a height to 
which one is unused. 

The-book-on-your-head-and-march-round- 
the-room drill should be done both bare 
footed and wearing shoes. 

Other barefoot exercises help, such as 
pressing your weight forward from the 
heel to the ball of your foot and toes, then 
reverse. 

One point worth remembering: When 
you are on the threshold of a room full of 
people pause for a second and take your 
bearing. 

A quick look round will give you time 
to locate your hostess and her time to 
locate you. You will find that this second s 
pause is a great asset in developing car 
riage. 

This is also when your facial poise comes 
into its own. The sea of strangers or 
friends beyond the door will not bring n 
simpering grimace to your mouth or a 
haunted look to your eyes. 

"I shall pass through this world but once. 
Any good that I can do, or any kindness 
that I can show any human being, let me 
do it now and not defer it, for I shall not 
pass this way again." 



Australian Home Journal, Aligust I, 1949 



37 



PRAM SET 

g| [From page 31.] 
The Eight Front. 

Cast on 106 sts., and work in g.s. for 7 
rows. Change to pat. as on back, keeping 
7 sts. at front edge in g.s. until work meas 
ures 8 ins. from the cast-on edge, then 
shape body -thus: 

Next row (right side of work): K. 8 (k. 
2 tog.) 49 times (57 sts.). Change to st.-st. 
with 7 sts. at front edge in g.s. for 10 
rows. Shape armhole by casting off 4 sts. 
at the beg. of the next row, starting at 
scam edge and dec. at the same edge on 
the following 5 rows (48 sts.). Continue 
without further shaping until work meas 
ures 12 ins. from the cast-on edge. Then 
shape neck by casting off 18 sts. at the 
beg. of the next row, starting at front 
edge and dec. at the same edge on the next 
6 rows (24 ets.). Now shape shoulder by 
casting off 6 sts. at the beg. of the next 4 
rows, starting at armhole edge. 
The Left Front. 

Work as for right front but reversing 
all shapings. Work g.s. border at end of 
row instead of at the beg. Shape body 
thus (right side of work): (K. 2 tog.) 49 
times, k. 8 (57 sts.). 

The Collar. 

Join the shoulders by back-stitching the 
edges together. Now, holding the wrong 
side of work towards you, pick up and 
draw through 61 sts. round neck, starting 
and finishing at 3rd st. from front edge. 
Work in st.-st., keeping 3 sts. at each end 
in g.s. for 4 rows, then inc. in every 5th st. 
on the next row (on st.-st. part only), 4 
rows without shaping, then inc. in every 
6th st. on the next row. Continue without 
further shaping until collar measures 2 ins. 
in depth, then work in all g.s. for 6 rows. 
Cast off. 

The Sleeves. 

Cast on 24 sts., and work in st.-st., cast 
ing on 2 sts. at the beg. of every row until 
60 sts. are on needle. Continue in st.-st., dec. 
at each end of every 6th row until 48 sts. 
remain. Continue without further shaping 
until seam measures 6$ ins. Now reverse 
the st.-st. for turned-back cuff for 1 in. 
Finish with 7 rows of g.s., then cast off. 
Work another sleeve to match. 

Making-np: Press carefully. Back-stitch 
all seams i in. from the edges, and insert 
sleeves in the same way. Fasten coat with 
press-studs and stitch four buttons on top. 



A Biting Question. 

A hitherto invisible export of National 
Health Service British dentures was men 
tioned in the House of Lords recently. 

Lord Hawke asked tfce Earl of Listowel 
if he was aware "that Lascar crews are 
arriving without teeth in their heads, get 
ting national teeth and going back and 
selling them in bazaars of their own 
country?" 

Lord Saltoun: "Will he inquire how these 
people get their spectacles and teeth so 
much sooner than those who belong to this 
country?" 

Lord L-istowel, who had previously said 
the National Health Act covered foreigners 
visiting Britain, did not reply. 
* 

STAMPS NOT ACCEPTED. 

Readers are again reminded that 
we do not take postage stamps in 
payment of pattern orders. Only 
postal notes or money orders will 
be accepted. 




"Children thrive on 
KRAFT CHEESE 



99 



says MATRON ARMSTRONG 




Doctors, nurses and clinics 
recommend Kraft Cheese for 
children from the age of two 
years. They know Kraft Cheese 
is rich in the vital food values 
growing children need every 
day. High quality proteins, 
Vitamins A, B 2 and D plus 
the valuable milk minerals, 
calcium and phosphorus. Kraft 
Cheese helps build sturdy limbs 
. strong teeth. 



When you give your child 
Kraft Cheese sandwiches to 
lake to school, you KNOW he 
will enjoy a really nourishing 
and sustaining lunch. Matron 
Armstrong says: "Children s 
lunches should always be tasty, 
nourishing and easily 
digested." That s Trfoy -she 
recommends Kraft Cheese. 

No rind. No waste. Kraft 
Cheese saves you money. And 
remember, Kraft Cheese stays 
fresh to the last delicious slice. 



KRAFT 
CHEESE 



Tersfes better because it s BLENDED BETTER 




38 



Australian Home Journal, August I, 



The Daily Diet of 
EVERY EXPECTANT MOTHER 

should be well balanced and should include essential Vitamins and 
Mineral Salts, for these play a vital part in the building of a strong, 
healthy, well-developed baby. 

BIO-CHEM1C TREATMENT now will supply these essential Vitamins 

and Mineral Salts by natural means through the Twelve Bio-Chemic 

Nerve and Tissue building Cell Salts. They will also safeguard your 

own system to meet the added strain, and ensure a rich supply of 

natural milk, a more comfortable confinement and a speedy recovery. 

Consu/tatiom and expert ad< ice free of charge no obligation. 

Write to Dept. AW. 8 for FREE BOOKLET. 

Established 20 years. 



BIO-CHEMIC INSTITUTE 



BCX 1243 U, G.P.O., MELBOURNE. 
Office: 103 QUEEN STREET, MELBOURNE, C.I. Phone: MU 197t. 




1104 



To clean and sterilize 
Dentures . . . 



There is no excdse for stains 
on false teeth. "Steradent" was 
specially invented to remove 
such stains. 

To make a stained and dis 
coloured denture clean and lus 
trous once more place it in 
"Steradent" overnight or while 
you dress. You will take it out 
fresh and clean. 

"Steradent" is harmless to the 
materials of which dentures are 
usually made, including the new 
acrylic resins. 



Steradent 

-. -.; " :;.- ; : ; >- Vf- OfCn. :-. 



Reckitt & Colman (Aust.) Ltd., 
(Pharmaceutical Divn.) Sydney 



Wonderful FREE BOOK proves there is 

NO NEED TO WEAR GLASSES 



.HUNDREDS of men, women and young people have 
written to me, worried and fearful about their eyes. 
After reading the amazing free book, " Better Natural 
Sight Without Wearing Glasses," they have found that 
there is a way to regain normal vision without the need 
of glasses at all. 

My patients include men for the Navy and Air 
Force, and also men qualifying for all trades 
and professions : Civil Aviators, Civil Ser 
vants, Clerks, Motorists, Engineers, Policemen, 
Railwaymen, Engine Drivers people whose 
careers depend upon their eyes. 




m 




Try this simple test 
for ASTIGMATISM. 
To the normal eye 
the width and depth 
of colour in the 
black bars of all 
four circles are uni 
form. When astig 
matism exists there 
is variation in the 
width and depth of 
bars. 



If you suffer from 

SHORT SIGHT LONG SIGHT 

FAILING SIGHT ASTIGMATISM 

TIRED EYES, GLARE, 

TURNED EYES 

STRAIN EYE HEADACHES 

or any other eye weakness (except 

diseased eyes) write for my BOOK 

or call for free consultation at 

EYESIGHT TRAINING 

(Ferguson System) 

Room 604H, Manchester Unity Bldg. 
185 Elizabeth St., Sydney. MA.5455 

* 

HOW TO GET MY BOOK FREE 
Just write (enclosing 2ld. postage) or 
call TO-DAY for 32-page Free 
Booklet, "Better Natural Sight With 
out Wearing Glasses" This includes 
testimonials from happy people who have 
discarded glasses. It will open up a new 
avenue of hope for you. 

FREE CONSULTATION 
Ring MA 5455 for Free Consultation. 



PRINCESS CHARMING 

Small daughters can go to the party in a 

new dress, even, with a last-minute 

invitation. The dress will fit any little girl 

between three and five years of age. 

This enchanting little frock, made from 
just 1 yard square of material, is so simple 
to make and it needs no pattern. The 
finished length of the dress can be up 
to 22 inches and the waist and neek are, 
of course, adjustable. 

As well as the material which should 
have no up or down, you need 2J yards 
narrow ribbon to match and 2 yards bias 
binding. 

From the square, cut a piece 23 inches by 
36 inches and a piece 23 inches by 13 
inches (this leaves a 13-inch square). Join 
both pieces together along the 23-incli 
sides, to form a tube. Pin the two layers 
of material together with the narrow panel 
central at back. 




Mark centre of top of front and back. 
For neck cut out a curve between the 
seams of the back panel, making it 1 incli 
deep at centre back and 2 inches deep at 
centre front, tapering off to nothyig at 
each side. Seam shoulders for 2$ inches 
from each side of neck opening. 

For armholes, slit down each side for 
5 inches. From remaining material cut 
four 1-inch wide strips. Join to make two 
strips each 26 inches long. Hem one edge 
and gather the other, to make frills. Edge 
all round each armhole with these. Face 
neck edge with bias binding to form casing 
for drawstring, and at waist level sew 
binding flat on the wrong side to make a 
similar casing. Make openings at centre 
front in casings. Thread ribbon at neck 
and waist. Turn up hem to the lengtli 
required. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



39 




Kathryn Grayson, M G M star, favours 
ice blue satin for her dressing gown. It 
is embroidered with white and silver 
doves along the shoulders, down the 
right front, continuing to the hem line. 
Back of gown is flared from the centre 
back in bustle effect. 



Up to Date. 

A small neat bead is a "must" so that 
women who do not want to cut their hair 
can ceil it in earphones over their ears. 

Little black velvet or satin toques which 
more closely resemble caps or pillbox 
shapes are the right millinery wear for 
evening restaurants or theatre-going. 

Fur muffs flourish. You see them in 
every kind of fur, skunk, leopard, fox, 
panther, and astrakhan. 

Heels continue to gain in height. The 
smartest shoes are those with thin soles, 
incredibly thin heels. One of the newest 
sandals shown in Paris is of Italian crea 
tion, a mere sole crossed by transparent 
bands or threads of colourless nylon. 



Beauty Hint. 

"Whenever I am not tied down to a 
more elaborate hair-do for filming pur 
poses," writes Anna Neagle, "I like to 
wear my hair in a very simple and straight 
forward style. 

"On the whole plainer hair styles are 
more nattering to most women and most 
important they stay neat and look appro 
priate on every occasion. 

"Whenever possible wash your hair in 
rain water . . . and use a reliable brand of 
shampoo. 

"A once a week shampoo is essential for 
the well-groomed woman. 

"Always wash your brush and comb 
when you shampoo your hair. If the ends 
start splaying, have your hair trimmed. 
Once hair splits its stops growing." 
*+ 

Cold water to drink every day, and a 
thorough cleansing of the face every night 
with cold cream before going to bed, will 
keep the skin in good condition, while a 
mixture of lemon juice and cold water 
makes an excellent lotion for freeing the 
pores from spots and other blemishes, and 
for countering a shiny nose. 




WHEN BABY NEEDS A LAXATIVE 

choose 

LAXETTES 

they re particularly suitable for infants 
and nursing mothers. 




18 IN TINS 1/9 



The 

LAXATIVE 

KNOWN and TRUSTED 



GENTLE, EFFECTIVE, 
SAFE, RELIABLE 

LAXETTES contain phenolphthalein, which is 
non- habit forming and is one of the safest 
and most reliable laxative substances known 
to medical science. This is incorporated in the 
finest block chocolate by an exclusive, 
scientific process, which ensures accurate 
dosage and strict conformity to British 



FOR 40 YEARS Pharmacopoeia standards. 



SAMPLE 
COUPON ...... 

-SEND2^d --- .......... -- 

stamp fo covor AH j 849 

postage and - ------ ________________ 

packing . . . to Laxette Mfg. Co., 3< Swanston Street, Melbourne 



40 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



5JiMfe^^ 




WHITEBAIT! Tiny inch-long fish, 
found only in the sparkling streams 
of New Zealand. For a distinctive, 
delicious treat you cannot find their 
equal. Their delicate flavour is 
unique and retained in St. George 
by quick canninq which seals the full 
freshness and delicate taste in every 
tin. Serve Whitebait for every 
occasion where an unusual dish is 
required. 

AT ALL LEADING 
AUSTRALIAN STORES 



ST. GEORGE 



Dunedin 



WHITEBAIT 

IRVINE STEVENSON S ST. GEORGE CO. LTD. N , w z , a | and 




Treasure your SILVER 

POLISH IT THE 
KINDLIEST WAY 



Such a lovely possession 
deserves the best of care! 
1 arnish and marring stains 
vanish with the safe and 
gentle kiss of Silvo . . . fot 
Silvo revives the enchanting 
glow borne by new silver. 



Silvo 

LIQUID SILVER POLISH 




Reduce WITHOUT DRUGS! 



1,000 
Guarantee 

1 guarantee that these 
testimonials are true 
extracts from un 
solicited letters re 
ceived and are open 
for inspection at my 
offices. 
(Sgd.) Joan Powell. 



Reduced 1 Stone 

Already 

"I was list. 31b. when 
I started your reduc 
ing method. I am now 
lOst. 31b." 

Later: "I am quite 
pleased with myself 
now. I can wear a 
tight-fitting dress with 
pleasure." Miss M.I. A. 
R., Qld. 



Lost a Stone in 
Weight 

"1 am thrilled with 
the results of the 
treatment and have 
already lost over a 
stone in weight. I 
think the treatment is 
wonderful." 

Miss M.C. F.. N.Z. 



Reduce Ugly Fat Quickly 

Now you can actually reduce those unnat 
ural bulging hips and that huge, unlovely 
waist - by a NEW, simple method. Without 
dangerous drugs. Secretly in your own room 
you can really watch those bulging hips dis 
appearing. An over-prominent, sagging bust. 
fat arms and legs, thick ankles, and double 
chin can be quickly banished with this mar 
vellous new reducing treat 
ment - it s something entirely 



BANISH : 

Wide Hips 

Large Bust 

Big Waist 

Fat Arms 

and Legs 

Double Chin, 

etc. 



JOAN POWELL. SALES DEPT. A.H.. 
24 Clarence Street, Sydney, N.S.W. 

I Please send me, with no obligation, your amazing "SOMETHING." 1 
enclose 2 id. in stamps. 



I 

| Address. 



Name 

Address Aug. 49 




The Play and Film 

[From page 27.] 

wardrobe of glamorous gowns for Margaret 
Leighton to wear in "The > Astonished 
Heart," in which she stars with Celia John 
son and Michael Eedgrave, describes her 
figure is "exquisite" and Bays she is the 
perfect English type. 

* 

Bette Davis apparently wasn t kidding 
when she said that her daughter, Barbara 
Davis Sherry, now going-on two, was to be 
kept out of the spotlight. Three producers 
who want to put the star s offspring into 
pictures as soon as possible got this terse 
reply: "Barbara will never appear on the 
screen until she is old enough to say yes 
or no on her own. One actress in a family, 
I think, is enough." 

* * 

Take it from Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra 
will some day be among Hollywood s top 
dramatic actors. So sure is Kelly of this 
that he is working on an original screen 
drama which he hopes to direct with 
Sinatra as his star. Kelly wrote "Take 
Me Out to the Ball Game" in which he co- 
stars with Sinatra. 

* * 

Robert Walker and Peter Lawford will 
be Deborah Kerr s leading men in the 
M-G-M comedy, "Please Believe Me." It s 
the story of an English girl who believes 
she has inherited a valuable ranch property 
in America. 

* 

Esther Williams first purchase in the 
way of furniture for the new home she and 
husband, Ben Gage, are building, is an 
antique cradle for the nursery. It dates 
back to about 1810 and is of walnut. The 
M-G-M star s baby is expected this month. 



The More Attractive Age. 

By 30, the pretty woman, the average 
pretty girl, has passed the summit of her 
looks. The woman whose mind lives and 
grows is often more lovely and more attrac 
tive after 30 than before. An intelligent 
woman is generally an attractive one. I 
don t mean by intelligence "intellectual 
ity." Intellect may or may not form the 
large part of intelligence. In itself, merely 
"knowing" has no value, and highbrowism 
is as desiccating a quality as stupidity, 
and even more boring. 

The quality which is so ranch easier to 
feel than describe, the quality which keeps 
a woman beautiful past 60, because its 
presence in them has kept at bay the age 
ing forces, the thickening and shrivelling 
influences of character, is a woman s 
capacity to learn and feel by every kind 
of experience. This is no mere generalisa 
tion. Look at the women who are still 
lovely at 45, beautiful at 60. 

Neither cosmetics nor plastic .surgery 
has produced in them an effect of syn 
thetic youth. They are not the women 
who by attendances at beauty parlours 
and observance of cults and creams, wear 
themselves out in exhausting imitation of 
girlhood. 

Watch them in their contacts with 
people. Each one of them is interested in 
life learning and feeling, giving out in 
terest and sympathy. Their minds are active. 
Bound up with this activity of mind and 
spirit there is activity of body. A certain 
organic health and vitality are undoubtedly 
connected with the endurance of beauty. 



It is better to know what to do in your 
own place than what you would do in the 
other woman s place. 

It is better to laugh your head off than 
cry your eyes out. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 




As feminine as anything that ever came 
out of the court of Louis XV is this eye 
let embroidery bastiste blouse which 
reveals the perfect shoulder-line of 
Paramount star Diana Lynn. With a 
black velvet bow topping her curls and 
a full black souffle swish skirt beneath, 
she s delightful. 



Happy Housework. 

Housework, the bugbear of so many 
women, is really one of the best means of 
keeping fit if tackled in th right spirit. 

It will do more towards keeping a youth 
ful figure than dozens of "daily dozens." 
But not just playing around with a duster 
and "doing the flowers." It s the vigorous 
exercise of sweeping and polishing and 
mattress turning that does all the good. 

Housework s monotonous, did you say? 
Have you tried working to wireless? Switch 
on and you will find it makes even dusting 
a pleasure. 

Do you find stair-climbing a burden? It 
shouldn t be, if taken easily; but if it is 
it might be wise to consult your doctor. 
There might be some slight derangement 
of the system which can be easily 
remedied, for to the healthy woman climb 
ing stairs is a fine tonic and very slimming 
to the ankles. 

A healthy body is reflected in a healthy, 
happy face; so if your feet are not to 
blame for those wrinkles, perhaps your 
eyesight i. Probably spectacles are 
needed, and there is no need to object to 
spectacles as an obvious sign of old age. 
It would be wise to consult the best oculist 
you can afford, and if he advises "spectacles 
hare them eorrectly fitted and choose the 
new frames shaped and coloured to suit 
your face. You will find frowns will go 
and wrinkles be chased away. 



Triplets were born to a family where 
there was already a little girl of five. She 
was most annoyed at the arrival of the 
three, and complained to her mother: 
"That s the worst of sending Dad to order 
the baby. You know how he stutters." 





Australian Open 

and Professional 

Go/f Champion 

says: 




"We re a family of Horlicks drinkers at 

home. We agree it s the most nourishing 

of all food drinks." 



"Playing championship golf is a 
matter of skill and concentration 
plus plenty of hard work", says 
Ossie. "You need all those to gel 
to the top and you need to be 
really fit to stay there, too. I ve 
proved that Horlicks gives me the 
nourishment and that extra energy 
which makes all the difference." 

The full, satisfying flavour of 
Horlicks comes from a careful 
blend of fresh, full-cream milk 
and the nutritive extracts of malted 
barley and wheat. It is Nature s 
flavour . . . that s why you never 
tire of it. 

Many people drink Horlicks 
simply because they enjoy that 
distinctive flavour. Others drink 
it because they need it to build 
them up ... to nourish the body 
and nerves . . . and to induce deep. 



refreshing sleep. Bui uhate\er 
ihe reason everyone enjoys 
Horlicks. Equally delicious hoi 
or cold. 




Rich in these food values 




when mned as directed 



OSSIE PICKWORTH holds b<*h th<- 
Open and Australian Professional 
titles a double no other player 
has ever icon. "Playing golf for m 
living is strenuous and tiring," say 
Ossie, "that s why I like Horlicks. 
I find it the most nourishing fond 
drink of all." 



Ask your storekeeper for 

HORLICKS 

8-oz. tin 22 16-oz. tin 3 6 

Price* slightly higher in country aretn 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



According to an Australian wide survey 

conducted by an independent Research Organisation 

more than 8 out of 10 Dentists recommend IPANA 

in preference to any other Tooth Paste. 




Dentists 





IPANA 



TOOTH PASTE 





SOLO ONLY BY CHEMISTS 



810 - 



Chafed Skin? 

Keep it Soft and Supple 

Nivea soothes, nourishes 
heals . . restores natural 
skin oils. Doctors use and 
recommend it. 2/- every 
where. Set a tin to-day. 

Skin needs 

NIVEA 

The All-purpose Creme 




NEED A 
CHANGE? 



Feel at the end of your tether? 
Can t go on? Every little thing 
is getting you down? The only 
thing is a complete change, 
but you can t have it? then 
try WINCARNIS, the marvel 
lous tonic that tones up your 
whole system, strengthens your 
nerves and makes everything 
bright again. WINCARNIS i 
a blend of choice selected wines 
with nourishing ingredients and 
special fortifying elements, 

rich in essentials for the good 
health and energy you envy 
so much in others. Many thou 
sands of recommendations by 
medical men prove how effec 
tive WINCARNIS is for getting 
tired, worried men and women 
back to vital buoyant health. 
Ask your Chemist for WIN 
CARNIS ... the Wine of Life. 



Hair Needs 
Nourishment . . . 

just the some as the rest of your Body. 
This is supplied by twice-a-day scalp 
massage with KOKO. then brush your 
Hair vigorously; you will be surprised 
with the improvement KOKO. tb 
famous British Hair Preparation, i fr 
from oil. grease and dya 

Ask youi Chemist for 

KOKO 

FOR THE HAIR 



Jones: "How s the pain in the neck this 
morning?" 

Brown: "Oh, she was in a rile temper 
when I left home." 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



43 



PRETTY AS A PICTURE 



-Knit it then frill it. 



K. 3, * m. 1, k. 2 tog., k. 5, 
, ending k. 1, instead of k. 5. 



Materials: 7 ozs. 3-ply; 1 pair No. 10 and 
1 pair No. 12 needles; 1 No. 16 Stratnoid 
crochet hook; 2 yds. frilling. 

Measurements: Length from shoulder, 
20$ ins.; width all round at underarm; to 
fit 34-inch bust; sleeve seam (cuff turned 
back), 5 ins. 

Tension: 7 sts. to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st., 
-sts., stitch, stitches; pat., pattern; tog., 
together; m., make; rep., repeat; inc., 
increase or increasing; dec., decrease or 
decreasing: beg., beginning; st.-st., stock 
ing-stitch (1 row k., 1 row p.); eh., chain; 
<l.c., double crochet; g.s., garter stitch 
(every row k.). 

The Back. 

With No. 12 needles, cast on 110 sts. 
Work 3 ins. K. 1, p. 1 rib., inc. 1 st. at 
end of last row. (Ill sts.) Change to No. 
10 needles and pat. 

1st row: * K. 5, k. 2 tog., m. 1, rep. from 
* to last 6 sts., k. 6. 

2nd row: P. 

3rd row: K. 

4th row: P. 

5th row: K. 

6th row: P. 

7th row 
rep. from 
Eep. rows 2 to 6. 

These 12 rows form patt. Inc. 1 st. each 
end of next row, and every following 6th 
row until 125 sts. Work without further 
shaping until 13 ins. from beg. 
Shape Armholes. 

Cast off 3 sts. at beg. of next 8 rows, 
then dee. 1 st. at each end of every row 
until 97 sts. remain. Work 3^ ins. 
Yoke. 

Work 4 rows g.s. Work 3 ins. st.-st. 
Shape Shoulders. 

Cast off 8 sts. at beg. of next 8 rows. 
Cast off remaining sts. 

The Front. 

Work as given for back until armhole 
shaping is complete, then divide sts. for 
yoke. 

1st row: Work 40 sts., cast off 17 ats., 
work 40 sts. Continue in turn on each set 
of 40 sts., dec. 1 st. in every row at neck 
edge until 32 sts. remain, then in every 
row until 20 sts. remain. Cast off. 
Right Yoke. 

With No. 10 needles, cast on 6 sta. 

1st row: K. 

2nd row: Cast on 2 sts., p. to end. Eep. 
rows 1 and 2 three times. 

9th row: K. to last st., inc. in last st. 

10th row: P. Eep. rows 9 and 10 until 
26 sts. (32 rows). 

33rd row: K. 

34th row: Cast on 20 sts. P. to end. Work 

inch without shaping. 

Shape Neck. 

(Eight side of work facing.) 

Cast off 6 sts. at beg. of next neck edge 
row, then work 2 ins., dec. 1 st. in every 
row at neck edge until 32 sts. remain. 
Shape Shoulder. 

Cast off 8 sts. at beg. of next 4 armhole 
end rows. With No. 10 needles pick up 
and k. 54 sts. round lower edge of yoke. 
K. 3 rows g.s. Cast off. Work another 
yoke, with shapings at opposite edges. 
The Sleeves. 

With No. 12 needles, cast on 82 sts. 
K. 4 rows g.s., then work in k. 1, p. 1 rib 
until 2 ins. from beg., inc. 1 st. at end of 
last row. 



Change to No. 10 needles and work in 
pat. Inc. 1 st. each end of every 6th row 
until 97 sts. Work without further shap 
ing until 6 ins. from beg. 
Shape Top. 

Cast off 1 st. at beg. of every row until 
39 sts. remain. 

Next row: K. 3 tog. to end. P. 1 row. 
Cast off. 

The Collar. 

With No. 12 needles, cast on 120 sts. 
Work 1J ins. K. 1, p. 1 rib. 

Next row: Cast on 18 sts., k. to end. Eep. 
this row once. K. 2 rows g.s. Cast off. 
Stitch cast-on edges of these 18 sts. to 
sides of ribbing. 

Underwrap. 

With No. 12 needles, cast on 8 sts. Work 
5 ins. K. 1, p. 1 rib. Cast off. 
Button-catch. 

With No. 12 needles, cast on 8 sts. Work 
J inch. K. 1, p. 1 rib. Make buttonhole: 



Eib 2 sts., k. 2 tog., m. 2, k. 2 tog., rib/2 
sts. Work 4 more buttonholes 1 inch apart. 
Eib i inch. Cast off. 

Buttons (5). 

With crochet hook, work 3 ch. Join in 
ring with slip st. Work 2 d.c. into each 
ch. Work 2 rounds of d.c. in each d.c. 
Cut wool. Pill with cotton wool and draw 
up. 

To Make Up. 

Press on wrong side, using hot iron over 
damp cloth. Sew front yokes in position. 
Sew side, shoulder and sleeve seams. Sew 
in sleeves, arranging fulness to tops of 
shoulders. Sew button-catch and under- 
wrap in position. Sew collar to neck. 
Press seams. Sew on buttons. Stitch the 
frilling to edges of collar, cuffs and front 
yoke, arranging fulness evenly. 
-*-> 

Bleeding from the Nose: Plug the nos 
trils with a piece of absorbent wool dipped 
in Friar s Balsam. Or, apply ice-water to 
the root of the nose and to the nape of the 
neck. Syringing with alum and water is 
also good. 



t 
- I | 




44 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 



MIDDLE-AGED MAN OFFERS ADVICE 



TO FATHER 





AND SON 





It is imperative that your body be thoroughly clean inside if it is 

to have the best chance of escaping ailments of all kinds. 

When the liver and kidneys function less efficiently because of old 

age, over-indulgence or other causes, they then no longer keep the 

system fully cleansed of poisonous wastes. 

A teaspoonful of Kruschen taken daily before breakfast in a tumbler 

of hot water stimulates the liver, washes out the kidneys and helps 

them to keep the system free of poisonous wastes. 

A clean internal system keeps the bloodstream clean and healthy. 

Gone are the causes that may lead to such ailments as ... 

RHEUMATISM ACHING JOINTS 

LUMBAGO BACKACHE NEURITIS 



KRUSCHE 

The Tonic Effect of Kruschen Keeps Millions of People Fit. 




SALTS 

1/6 & 2/9 
at Chemists 
and Stores. 




BABY 
WILL 
THRIVE 




la the early stages, the ideal 
alternative to natural feeding 
is Robinson s Patent Barley 
with cow s milk. Then, at 
weaning time, give baby 
Robinson s Patent Groats, a 
creamy-smooth cereal that is 
very nourishing and easy for 
baby to digest 

ROBINSON S 



ROBINSONS 



BARLEY 

& 
GROATS 



ROBINSONS] 
.CROATS 

.*W"*n, t " 3 



in with o 




HALF MEASURES 
TAKE FOOLISH CHANCES 



Get after your chest cold with moist heat a 
time-proven treatment endorsed by many doctors 
all over the world. Antiphlogistine Poultice gives 
you the benefits of moist heat right in your 
own home. Just do these two simple things 
recommended by many doctors: 

1. Put an Antiphlogistine Poultice on back and 
chest. Throat, too if it s sore. 

2. Go to bed. Antiphlogistine Poultice works all 
through the night. Helps you get a good night s 
sleep. 





The soothing warmth of 
Antiphlogistine Poultice relaxes 
tense or aching muscles, stimulates 
circulation, helps ease coughs due 
to colds. 




Wrist Watches, Cameras, Ma -Ma DO//S. 
Fountain Pens. Many other Valuable Prizes for 
selling small parcels of tested gar den seeds. Send 
for parcel and big catalogue of presents. Send no 
money nov, only name and address. Write to-day. 
John B. Murray, Ml K George St., Sydney 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 



45 



Jumper with Jair 3sle Bands 



Materials: 5 ozs. 3-ply, in royal blue, 1 
oz. white and a small ball each of red and 
green; a pair each of Nos. 11 and 10 
Stratnoid knitting needles; a No. 15 cro 
chet hook. 

Measurements: Length from shoulder, 
18 ins. To fit 35-inch bust measurement. 
Sleeve seam, 6 ins. 

Tension: 8 sts. and 10 rows to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; tog., 
together; sts., stitches; st.-st., stocking- 
stitch; rep., repeat; beg., begin or begin 
ning; cont., continue: dec., decrease or de 
creasing; inc., increasing or increase; 
ptn., pattern; G., green; W., white; K., 
red. 

K. into the backs of the cast-on sts. to 
produce firm edges. 

The Back. 

Using royal blue wool and No. 11 needles, 
oast on 100 sts. and work in a k. 1, p. 1 
rib for 3 ins. Change to No. 10 needles 
and k. twice into every 5th st. all aloug 
(120 sts.). Cont. in st.-st. until work 
measures 12 ins. from lower edge, finishing 
after a p. row. 

Shape Armholes: Cast off 5 sts. at beg. 

of next 4 rows (100 sts.). Cont. without 

further shaping until armholes measure 7 

.ins. in depth. Shape shoulder by casting 

off 8 sts. at beg. of next 8 rows. Cast off. 

The Front. 

Work as for back until work measures 
12 in. from lower edge, finishing after a 
p. row. 

Shape Armholes: Cast off 5 sts. at beg. 
of next 2 rows. Change to W. and cast off 
5 sts. at beg. of following 2 rows. 

Commence Fair Isle yoke. 1st row: * 
K. 4 W., 2 E.; rep. from * over 48 sts., 
k. 2 W., turn. Put remaining sts. oa a 
st. holder for now. 2nd row: P. 2 W., * 
2 K., 4 W.; rep. from * to end. 3rd row: 
K. * 1 G., 2 W., 1 G.; rep. from *, ending 

1 W. 4th row: P. 5 W., * 2 G., 4 W.; rep. 
from * to end. 5th row: As 3rd row. 
6th row: As 2nd row. 7th row: As 1st row. 
8th row: P. W. 9th row: K. W. 10th row: 
P. B. llth row: K. B. 12th row: P. B. 

These 12 rows form the ptn. Rep. last 
12 rows twice more, ending last ptu. with 

2 rows B. instead of 3 and finishing at 
front edge. Cout. with B. only and shape 
neck: 

1st row: Cast off 12 sts. and work to 
end. Now coiit. in st.-st., dec. 1 st. at neck 
edge on every row until 32 st. remain. 

Shape Shoulder: Cast off 8 sts. at arm- 
hole edge 4 times. 

Join wool to inside edge of remaining 
sts. and work up this side to correspond, 
but reading the Fair Isle ptn. rows back 
wards, as follows: 1st row: K. 2 W., * 2 
R. 4 W.; rep. from * to end. 
The Sleeves. 

Using No. 11 needles and royal blue 
wool, cast on 72 sts. and work in a k. 1, 
p. 1 rib for 2 ins. 

Change to No. 10 needles and inc. thus: 
K. twice into every 3rd st. all along (96 
sts.). Cont. in st.-st. for 4 ins. Shape 
top: Cast off 5 sts. at beg. of next 2 B. 
rews, then 5 sts. at beg. of next 2 W. rows. 

Now cont. in the Fair Isle ptn., dec. 1 
st. at beg. of every row until 3 Fair Isle 
bands have been worked, then cont, with 
B. only and dec. at beg. of every row 
until 30 sts. remain. Cast off. 
To Make Up. 

Press. Sew up shoulder seams. Sew 
sleeves into armholes, sew up side and 



o-Qo- 

sleeve seams. With W. wool and crochet 
hook work a row of d.c. round front open 
ing and neck. Starting at top of right 
front, work 4 more rows of d.c. round 
neck, finishing- at top of right front. Make 
buttonhole loops down front thus: * 4 ch., 
miss 1 d.c., 1 d.c. into each of next 5 d.c.; 
rep. from * until 5 loops have been made. 
Fasten off. Sew on buttons. Press seams. 



Sprains: Rub well with turpentine lini 
ment, and bandage the part with a linen 
bandage. Rest the injured limb and apply 
hot fomentations. Aconite liniment is also 
good. 



Making Raw Starch. 

It is better to make raw starch for shirts 
and collars the day before it is required. 
Mix $ Ib. starch with about a quart of cold 
water. When required for use, pour that 
water off without disturbing the settled 
starch, add 1 pint of water, mix well, strain 
through muslin. Boil two teaspoonsful of 
powdered borax in half a pint of water and 
add to the starch while boiling. For 
shirts, the starch is all the better used 
warm. Some laundresses add a teaspoon- 
ful of pure turpentine to the borax water. 
It adds to the polish, but its too frequent 
use turns linen yellow. 

Never throw away remains of raw starch. 
When it has settled, pour off the water and 
keep the starch to use up when making 
boiled starch. 




46 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 




COLDS 

GET BETTER 

I FASTER! 




There s no waiting for relief when 
you rub VapoRub on chest, 
throat and back at bedtime. And 
how children love it ! 



FIGHTS COLDS OUTSIDE 





This 



LIKE A POULTICE, VapoRub starts 
immediately to work on the skin, 
wanning away tightness and pain 
and "drawing out" congestion. 
INHALED VAPOURS released by body 
warmth and breathed in, start to 
clear stuffy nose, 
soothe sore throat 
and relieve cough 
ing the very min 
ute VapoRub is ^^ 
applied. And- ^ V A P O R U B 




inside-outside" action 
works for hours 
. . . while the child 
sleeps comfort 
ably. By morning, 
usually, the worst 
of the cold is over. 



LEG ULCER DISAPPEARS 
Another "VAREX" Success 

"Just a line to tell you that Varex Treat- 
.ment has been quite a success in my case," 
writes one grateful user. "The ulcer, with 
its consequent pain and swelling, has en 
tirely disappeared, and the leg is qu.te 
normal." "Varex" is a simple, inexpen 
sive home treatment. No resting required. 
Only one dressing per week. Write for 
free booklet. Ernest Healey, Pharma 
ceutical Chemist. Varex, Rooms 523-524, 
5th Floor. St. James Building, 1 09W 
Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



DRINK HABIT 
DESTROYED 

Do you suffer through the curse of 
excessive drinking? EUCRASY has 
changed homes from misery and 
want to happiness again. Established 
52 years it destroys all desire for 
Alcohol. Harmless, tasteless, can be 
given secretly or taken voluntarily. 
State which required. 

SEND 20/- FULL TWENTY 

DAYS COURSE. 
DEPT. B, EUCRASY CO. 

297 Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 




Just take 
a i-tea- 
spoo nful 
TWO or 
three 
times a 
day, for 
health. 



\ration 
of any kind required. 

NATURE S WAY 
TO HEALTH . 



Monastery Herbs are Nature s own 
remedy a mixture of herbs, seeds, 
barks and flowers, finely ground and 
blended in the true tradition of the 
monks of old. A quarter of a tea- 
spoonful taken regularly with meals 
will make you gloriously well. Take 




Nature s own treatment for CONSTI 
PATION, INDIGESTION, ACIDITY, 
RHEUMATISM, BAD BLOOD, GOUT, 
LIVER and KIDNEY COMPLAINTS. 
SKIN DISEASES. 

Taken regularly, Monastery Herbs will 
quitkly cleanse your system of the 
poisons that cause painful symptoms. 
Joint and muscle pains vanish, stomach 
and intestines are cleansed, the blood 
purified. Boils and blemishes dis 
appear in no time. Send for your sup 
ply of Nature s own remedy, NOW! 

Sole Proprietors: MONKSEATON HERBAL 

ISTS LTD.. 52 Peru St., Salford. 3 Lane*.. 

England. 

SEND THIS COUPON NOW/ - 

Send 1/6 Postal Note for I 01. package 
of Monastery Herbs. Post free. This will 
bring you by post an ample supply for a 
thorough-going test of the virtues of this 
natural aid to good health. Send to-day. 
8 oz. size also available at IO/-, post free. 

COMMONWEALTH & DOMINION AGENCIES 
PTY. LTD., Box 2949, 6.P.O.. Sydney. N.S.W. 



NAME... 



ADDRESS 



Make 

baby s 

hair 




If far from town send postal note or 
stamps to Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



47 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[TURNINGS MUST BE ALLOWED FOR ON ALL PATTERNS] 



FROCK, 7440. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Skirt. Pin skirt pattern over a double 
thickness of paper and mark in all punch 
holes along the upper edge. Cut around the 
entire outer edge through both thicknesses 
of paper; fold under portion above punch 
holes. Use one piece for front of skirt and 
the other piece for back, and cut off 1$ 
inches along the entire side. 

Bodice. Fold under portion below 
notches on bodice back before pin 
ning pattern to material, and if 
padded shoulders are not needed, 
shorten shoulder seams by cutting 
off i inch at armhole end and shape 
a new armhole curve off to 
nothing about halfway 
down armhole as shown on 
cutting guide. Cut off inch 
at armhole end of shoulder 
seam on both front and 
back and taper the seam 
line to nothing at neck end. 

Sleeve. Pin the half- 
sleeve to a large sheet of 
paper, mark along punch- 
holes indicating underarm 
curve. Fold paper along 



HALF 
BACK 



~~~-i 




HALF 
BACK 
SKIRT 



FOLD OF 



straight edge and cut around armhole, 
underarm and lower edge through both 
thicknesses. Notch armhole, open out new 
pattern and cut along previously marked 
underarm curve. 

Front Facings. Pin bodice front to paper, 
then pin upper edge of mid-section to 
lower edge of bodice with centre front 
lines meeting. Cut a pattern for front 
facing as shown, using pattern as guide. 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: As this 
pattern has been cut for the average 36- 
inch figure it will be necessary to see 
whether alterations are needed. Pin pieces 
together, remembering that seam and hem 



allowances are not included. Place pattern 
over figure and observe fitting. If bodice 
front and back are too long, shorten by 
folding between armhole and waistline, 
and if too short, cut in same place and 
insert sufficient paper to provide additional 
length required. 

To increase pattern, pin additional strips 
of paper along seam edges where extra 
width is required, and to decrease 
pattern, trim away pattern edges 
where additional width is not needed. 
Remove pattern from figure, take 
apart, press flat, even up all seam 
edges. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Pin pat 
tern to material as shown in cutting 
guide. Cut out with allowance 
of 2 inches for skirt hem, 1 inch 
on underarm seams and \ inch 
on all other edges. Before re 
moving pattern from material, 
mark clearly with tailor s chalk 
or tacking the exact seam lines, 
notches and punchholes. 

Step 4. Bodice: Join collar at 
centre back in a plain seam and 
press open. Machine f inch 
from neck end of front shoulder 
seam just outside marked 
shoulder seam line right to 
corner and then along neck edge 
for inch just outside marked 
neck line. Make a diagonal cut 
right to stitching at corner, but 
take care not to cut the stitch 
ing. Pin bodice front and back 
together at shoulders and neck 
edge of collar to neck edge of 
bodice, with right sides of 
material facing. 

Machine from one end of 
shoulder across to other end in 
one continuous seam. Press 
shoulder seams open and neaten 
raw edges, press seam across 
neck with allowances together 
and extending upwards. Pin 
tucks at lower edge on the in 
side and machine in line with 
punchholes. Tie threads and 
; press with tucks towards centre 
x ?a front. 

Step 5. Mid-Section and Facing: Turn 
under the allowance along upper edge of 
front and back mid-sections and pin to 
lower edge of bodice front and back, easing 
fulness in back to fit back mid-section. 
Tack, machine as close as possible to seam 
edge, press and neaten. Join facing at 
centre back in a plain seam, press open and 
pin to bodice with right sides together. 
Machine up front, around collar and down 
front on other side. Cut away excess seam 
allowance to a \ inch of stitching, turn 
facing to inside, press, turn under all raw 
edges, machine through fold only and tack 
in place down fronts. Hem turned edge 
across shoulders and neck edge to the pre 
vious row of stitching on the inside. Lap 
right-hand side of bodice over left with 
centre front lines exactly over each other 
and tack together. 

Step 6. Skirt: Join fronts at centre front 
in a plain seam, then join backs at centre 
back, press open and neaten all raw edges. 
Pin pleats in skirt front and back exactly 
in line with punchholes along upper edge 
and tack in place. Turn under allowance 
along lower edge of mid-section and pin to 



upper edge of skirt front and back. Tack, 
machine as close as possible to seam edge, 
press and neaten. Pin front to back at 
sides and leave an opening about 3 inches 
above and 4 inches below waistline on the 
left side. Try on to observe fitting. Let 
out or take in seam allowance if desirable. 
Machine seams, press open and neaten. 

Step 7. Side Opening: Attach a zipper to 
side opening or cut two facing strips of 
self -material If inches wide and 1 inch 
longer than opening, with one edge along 
selvedge. Pin strips to front and back 
edges of opening with raw edges together 
and right sides of material facing. 

Machine \ inch from edges, press seams 
open and fold strips under so that selv 
edges are exactly under seam lines. Tack 
in place, machine \ inch from edge, press 
front or upper-side under on seam line, but 
allow back to extend under front. Tie- 
stitch- strips together at top and bottom. 
Sew hooks and bars to side opening if 
zipper is not used. 

Step 8. Sleeves: Join at underarms in 
plain seams, press open and neaten. Cut 
self-material bias facing strips 2 inches 
wide for lower edges. Pin to sleeves with 
right sides together, machine, cut away 
excess seam allowance, turn facing to 
inside, press, turn under raw edge, machine 
through fold only and slip-stitch in place. 
Pin sleeves to armholes with notches meet 
ing and ease evenly across tops. 

Step 9. Sleeve Pads: Cut a pattern for 
sleeve pads from a piece of paper 9$ inches 
long and 5J inches wide. Fold paper in 
halves crosswise and cut from the centre 
on one side in a curved line to cut ends 
on the other side. Open out pattern and 
cut four pieces of self-material from it. 
Provide a piece of cotton wool same shape 
as each pad, but omit seam allowance. Fin 
to inside of pad and draw padding away 
from outside edges, tapering it to nothing 
at points and keeping it thickest in centre 
of longest side. 

Tack together and keep all long stitches 
on the cotton wool side. Pin padding fac 
ing to pad, right sides together, and 
machine along two sides. Turn right side 
out, turn under raw edges and oversew 
together. Pin pads to frock with longest 
side extending f inch beyond armhole seam 
into sleeve and point in line with shoulder 
seam. Try on and note whether shoulder 
width is becoming and sleeves correctly 
set in. Alter if necessary, unpin pads, 
machine sleeves, press seams open across 
upper half of armhole, replace pads, "tie- 
stitch to seam allowance around armholes 
and neaten raw edges by overcasting. 

Step 10. Finishing: Sew fancy buttons to 
mid-section as shown in illustration. Close 
the portion above with snap fasteners and 
fasten mid-section with hooks and eyes, 
taking care to conceal all stitches on right 
side. Buttonholes may be made on mid- 
section if desired. Allow frock to hang 
overnight. Try on and mark a becoming 
length with chalk or pins, measuring up 
an even distance from floor. Turn the hem, 
secure by hand and complete with final 
pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
4| yards 36 inches wide. 

[For 38-inch bust, allow $ inch on side 
seams of front and back. For 34-inch bust 
take \ inch off side seams of front and 

back.] 



FROCK, 7441. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Skirt. Fold under pattern supplied from 
notch at top to one at lower edge. Pin 
[Turn to page 49."] 



48 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 




V 

Obtainable from 
all Chemists 



The modern antiseptic; 
deadly to germs, yet so safe that, 
in emergency, it could even be 
used in the dark. 

RECKITT & COLMAN (AUST.) LTD. (PHARMACEUTICAL DIVISION), SYDNEY 

4173 



iirasso 




It may be true that worry kills more 
people than work; but it s probably be 
cause more people worry than work. 

A piece of luck for the Eussian women 
is that they have got the vote in a country 
where therfi STP. no filpp.t.ions. 



There used to be an expression, "It is a 
shame to take the money." But nobody 
is using it these days. 

It used to be that two could live as 
cheaply as one. Now one can live as ex- 
nensivelv as two. 



ARE YOU SLOWLY 
POISONING YOURSELF? 

Remove the Cause 

WHEN waste matter is allowed 
to accumulate in the colon it has 
three effects. It weakens the 
muscular power of the body to 
remove it. It creates poisonous 
products which through the cir 
culation reach every cell in the 
body. It forms a breeding- 
ground for germs by the mil 
lions. That is the reason high 
authority to-day regards consti 
pation as primarilv responsible 
for eighty-five cases in every 
hundred of serious illness. Wny 
pnecialists all over the world 
have made internal cleanness 
their slogan. 

Coloseptic overcomes the pos 
sibility of Autoxima from the 
words auto (self), toxin (poison) 
br inducing better Internal 
Cleanness. 

Coloseptic is the product of in 
tensive research to find a remedy 
which would combat constipa 
tion at its source, the colon 

A level teaspoonful in a glass 
of water morning or night, once 
or twice a week, is sufficient after 
perfect relief is obtained. 

COLOSEPTIC 

FOR BETTER 
INTERNAL CLEANNESS 

At all chemists and stores. 
aa 

A healthy baby is 
a happy baby! 




You can keep baby happy and 
healthy, even during the difficult 
teething period by giving Steedman s 
Powders regularly. Steedman s 
safely and gently cook the blood 
stream and keep baby s habits 
regular. Steedman s have been used 
by mothers for over 100 years! 

Sive ;..... 

STEEDMANiS 

POWDERS 



ON SALE AT ALL CHEMISTS 

8832B 




Superfluous Hair 
Killed Quickly 

By "EXHAIR." Perfectly 
harmless. Guaranteed. Send 
stamped addressed envelope 
for particulars. Confidential. 
Janet Glanville, 247H Eliza 
beth Street, Sydney 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



49 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 47."] 

pattern thus folded to a double thickness 
of paper and cut out. Use folded edge for 
centre front and centre back lines, then 
cut off 1 inches along the entire side of 
one pattern piece and use this for the back. 
Bodice. If padded shoulders are not re 
quired follow directions given for altering 
pattern in Step 1, Pattern 7440. 

Sleeves. Be guided 

by suggestions given 
for Pattern 7440, 
but fold under the 
portion below the 
lower notches. 

Peplum. Cut a 
straight strip of 
paper 25 inches 
wide and 15^ inches 
long for front, and 
22 inches wide and 
inches long for 
back. 




Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: Step 2, 
Pattern 7440. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Step 3. Pattern 
7440. 

Step 4. Bodice: Join front to back at 
shoulders in plain seams, press open and 
neaten. Cut a self-material fitted facing 
1$ inches wide and 1^ inches longer than 
the opening indicated by notch at centre 
back. Join at shoulders, press open, pin to 
bodice with right sides together, machine 
around neck edge and $ inch each side of 
centre back line and across bottom of open 
ing. Cut on centre back line almost to 
stitching at bottom, cut away excess seam 
allowance around neck, turn facing to 



inside, press, turn under raw edge, machine 
through fold only and tie-stitch to seam 
allowance at shoulders. Close opening with 
a hook and bar and trim with twin buttons. 
Join front to back at underarms and leave 
an opening 3 inches above waistline on 
left side. 

Step 5. Peplum: Join front to back at 
sides and leave an opening 4 inches below 
waistline on left side. Press open, turn a 
hem 1} inches wide at lower edge, and 
machine in place. Arrange for two tucks 
1^ inches wide, as shown, thus taking up 
2^ inches of material in each one and also 
machine these in place. Lengthen machine 
stitch a trifle, and across upper edge, 
machine on seam line, commencing at 2^ 
inches from the centre front and back and 
continuing to within 3 inches of side seam. 
Stitch again a J inch above first stitching. 
Draw up all threads to a space of 3 inches. 
Tie threads and arrange fulness in even 
gathers. 

Step 6. Skirt: Join front to back at sides 
and leave an opening 4 inches below waist 
line on left side. Pin peplum to skirt with 
waistlines together; join to lower edge of 
bodice in a plain seam and ease fulness in 
bodice to fit skirt. Press and neaten. 

Step 7. Side Opening: See Step 7, Pat 
tern 7440. 

Step 8. Sleeve: Join at underarms in 
plain seams, press open, turn up lower edge 
and arrange for the one tuck in exactly 
the same way as hem and tucks in peplum. 
Pin sleeves to armholes and apply and 
finish pads as described in Steps 8 and 9 
of Pattern 7440. 

Step 9. Belt: Make belt, finish with a 
buckle and apply loops at side to hold it 
in place. 

Step 10. Finishing: Apply floral trim 
ming to left front as 
shown, then turn up 
hem as in Step 10, & 
Pattern 7440. if 

Pattern is for 36- 
in oh bust. Material: 
3f yards 36 inches 
wide. 

[For alteration to 
other sizes, see 
description No. 
7440.] 



* 



FROCK, No. 7442. 
Step 1. Completing 
Pattern: 

Skirt. Follow 
suggestions given 
in Step 1, Pattern 
7440. 

Bodice and 
Sleeves. See also 
Step 1, Pattern 
7440, and in 
this instance 
"fold under por- ( 
tion below 
upper notch for | 
short sleeve. 

Mark off f 
shape of bodice / 
front, following : : 
curved neckline 
outlined by ( 
punchholes and 
cut a new pat- |< 
tern for bodice j .. 
front. 

Mid -section. K 
Fold under the 
front pattern 
on the punch 
holes indicating 




centre front line and use folded edge for 
centre front of pattern. 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: Step 2, 
Pattern 7440. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Step 3, Pat 
tern 7440. 

Step 4. Bodice: Join front to back at 
shoulders in plain seams, press open and 
neaten. Cut a self-material fitted facing 
1 inches wide for neck edge and join at 
shoulders in plain seams. Press open and 
pin to neck edge with right sides facing. 
Machine on seam line, cut away excess 
seam allowance, turn facing to inside, 
press, turn under raw edge, machine 
through fold only and tack in place. Work 
eyelets through both thicknesses of 
material, as shown in illustration, then 
insert narrow velvet ribbon in and out 
and tie in a bow at centre front. 

Step 5. Gathering: Join skirt fronts at 
centre front and backs at centre back in 
plain seams, press open and neaten. 
Lengthen machine stitch a trifle, and 
across upper edge of skirt front and back, 
machine on seam line, commencing about 
4 inches from, side seam and continuing 
across top to within 4 inches of seam on 
the other side. Machine again a bare i 
inch above first stitching. Along lower 
edge of bodice front, machine in same way. 
Draw up all gathering threads to fit cor 
responding seam edge on upper and lower 

edges of mid- 

section. 

Step 6. Join 
ing Mid-sec 
tion: Turn 
under allow 
ance on upper 
and lower 
edges of mid- 
section and pin 
to lower edge 
of bodice front 
and back, and 
upper edge of 
skirt front and 
back. Tack, 
machine as 
close as pos 
sible to seam 
edge, press and m 
neaten. 

Joint front 
to back at 
sides and finish 
side opening in 
same way as in 
Steps 6 and 7, 
Pattern 7440. 

Step 7. 
Sleeves: Join 
at underarms 
in plain seams, 
press open, 
face lower edge 
and work eye 
lets in the 
same way 




FOLD OF MATERIM 



7442 



bodice, and insert ribbon. Apply sleeve to 
armholes and make pads, following sugges 
tions given in Steps 8 and 9 of Pattern 
7440. 

Step 8. Finishing: Finish the hem 
after first allowing frock to hang 
overnight, as in Step 10, Pattern 
7440. Complete with final pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Ma 
terial: 4 yards 36 inches wide. 

[For alterations to other sizes, see 
description No. 7440.] 




50 



Australian Home Journal, August 1 , 1 949 





Observe Jane Wyman, Warner Bros. 
star, in this very neat tailored costume. 
Jane tells us quite candidly she does not 
like frills and furbelows and trimmings 
on a costume. It has to be well tailored 
and good fitting; that is the secret of a 
suit one enjoys wearing. The unusual 
shaped collar will have a strong appeal 
to woman folk. 

*-- 
Communism. 

Womenfolk should be very much alive to 
the danger of Communism. It is the ideolo 
gical policy of Kussia which, in short, 
means repression, frustration and an ab 
sence of individual liberty and freedom. 
It is hard to understand why intelli 
gent Australians should fall for it. 
Its methods of propaganda are always 
indirect and insiduous. When you meet 
someone who, when challenged about being 
a Communist, replies: "I will neither deny 
nor confirm," you don t want to hear any 
more. Any person who is not a Communist 
will readily say so. The point to remember 
is that there is much silent propaganda 
going on among womenfolk and the younger 
set, propaganda that does not declare itself 
openly, because Communism is always an 
undercover affair. So it masquerades under 
different names and different associations 
and makes use of any vehicle for the dis 
semination of its doctrines. 



There is still much concern in Hollywood 
owing to the increasing use of drugs among 
the film folk. A police psychiatrist says: 
"It s a well-known fact that Hollywood 
people are jaded," he said. "They have 
tried everything. The only way they can 
get any stimulation is to indulge in mari 
juana. It s the only way they have left 
to get any thrill from romance. Marijuana 
acts as a potent romantic stimulant." 
* 

Once price was an indication of value; 
now it is an indication of nerve. 



Materials: 2 ozs. of blue and 2 ozs. 
of pink 3-ply wool; 1 pair of No. 6 and 
1 pair of No. 10 needles; medium crochet 
hook. 

Tension: 5 sts. and 7 rows equal 
1 inch. 

Abbreviations: P., purl; k., 
knit; m., make; pat., pattern; 
rep., repeat; st., stitch; tog., 
together; cii., chain; d.c., 
double crochet. 

Cast on 48 sts. on the 
No. 6 needles with blue 
wool. 

Next row K. 6, * 
m. 1, k. 4; rep. from 

* 7 times, m. 1, k. 10. 
Next row P. 
Now work in pat. 

as follows: 

1st row K. 

2nd row P. 

Rep. these 2 rows 
3 times. 

Change to pink 
wool. 

9th row P. 

10th row K. 

Eep. 9th and 10th 
rows 3 times. 

These 16 rows form 
pattern. Continue to 
work in these two 
wools until 30 pats, 
have been worked, 
then work from 1st 
to 8th row. 

Cast off 6 sts. 
loosely, * drop 1, cast 
off 4 loosely; rep. from 

* 7 times, drop 1, cast off 
10 sts. 

With No. 10 needles and blue 
(or pink) wool pick up every 
other st. along top of cape (183 
sts.), k. 2 tog. all along, knitting 
last st (92 sts.). Eib in k. 1, p. 1 
for 2 inches. Cast off loosely. 

Edging. 

Join blue wool on at neck edge, 1 d.e. 
in 1st st., * 3 ch., miss 2 sts., 1 d.c. in next 
st.; rep. from * all down sides and along 
bottom of cape, putting in 1 d.c., 3 ch., 1 
d.c. in 1 st. at corners. 

Work right round cape and along top 
edge of neck. 




CAPM 




Make chain in blue wool 33 inches, 
thread this where neck band joins cape. 

Two motifs at end of chain. Make 4 
ch., join in ring, 1 d.c., 3 ch., 1 d.e. 6 times 
in ring; break off and sew one to each end 
of chain. 

Press lightly under a damp cloth with a 
warm iron. 



Drink Traffic. 

From one of our States it is reported 
that while the population has increased by 
14 per cent, during the past few years, the 
consumption ojf drink has increased by 60 
per cent, for the same period. This is 
attributed to the fact that people start 
drinking at an earlier age, that more 
women (including young women) must 
have their glass of beer. Cocktail parties 
and night clubs have increased; also, the 
increase in wages can account for more 
drinking. 

All of this is to be deplored. The war, 
of course, can be blamed to a large extent 
when soldiers from other lands were here, 
and there was a great deal of excitement 
and free and easy living. These days are 
happily gone, and it behoves the commun 
ity to settle down to what we might call 
pre-war sobriety in a comparative sense. 
In this connection it has to be remembered 
that the night clubs get through a terrific 



amount of liquor. Just where it comes 
from and how they get it should be a mat 
ter for official enquiry. Also, the sly-grog 
sellers seem to secure unlimited quantities 
of drink. One of them arrested some weeks 
back had no less than 25 dozen bottles of 
beer. A big clean up is wanted. 



Luxury Spending. 

According to the advertisements in the 
daily press we are gradually getting back 
to the bad old days of luxury spending. It 
is a great pity when taxation is so heavy, 
and the world prospects ahead so uncer 
tain, that gourmets apparently have to be 
catered for. Here are some of the items: 
Gorgonzola cheese from Italy, 8/3 a lb.; 
Dutch Edam cheese, 8/3 a lb.; blue vein 
cheese from Denmark, 7/3 a lb.; assorted 
biscuits from England, 8/3 for a 1 lb. tin; 
pate de foie gras, 6/1 a tin: mushrooms in 
pure olive oil, 3/9 a tin; French dressed 
sauerkraut with sausages, 8/3 a tin; 
Italian olive oil, 2/6 for a 5-oz. tin. 



Australian Home Journal, August 1, 1949 



51 



This J/QUVIUy& breakfast 
gives you */Q of your 
daily food needs . . . 





FOO/> EXPERTS say: 



tliat one plate of Kellogg s Corn Flakes with 
milk and sugar plus fresh fruit and bread 
and butter (or toast) gives you 1/3 of your 
dailv food needs. 



And compare the 
cost with this typical 

heavy breakfast! 



It isn t necessary to quote prices 
. . . you know what you have to 
pay for eggs, bacon, tomatoes, 
fish, lamb s fry (etc.) these 
days! One serving of Kellogg s 
Corn Flakes is but a fraction of 
that cost. What s more, one 
plate of Kellogg s (lorn Flakes 
with milk and sugar is equal in 
energy value to three eggs, two 
big helpings of lamb s fry ir 




So light. . . 
delicious ... and so satisfying! 

These big, golden Kellogg s Corn Flakes not only 
taste luscious, but they are packed with energy value. 
Only 30 seconds to serve ... no greasy washing 
up ... no messy pots and pans. So serve Kel 
logg s Corn Flakes to all your family. Remembe: 
to say "Kellogg s" before you say Corn Flake.- 
because nothing else can equal them for flavour, 
energy value or freshness. 



FREE RECIPE BOOK. Send your name and address t<> 

Kelloggs, Box 8, P.O., Mascot, N.S.W. and you ll receive 
a wonderful new Recipe Book. FREE and POST FREE. 



SERVE 




CORN FLAKES 



SAVE TIME. TROUBLE 4*0 HONEY 



Printed by John bands Pty. Ltd., Druitt St., Sydney, and Published by James Russell, tor the Proprietors, at the Australian Hon.e 

!,, ! Oflfi^. . "U !., ,! U~,, 4O7 AC\Q k ^t ^f i,,J^ 



Australian 



CLrnotts 









*i$ 






The most pleasant break in every school day is playtime and the school lunch. There s 

a tasty snack then to be enjoyed, so make that snack Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits. 

In buying for your children, be sure you get Arnott s. 

There is no Substitute for Quality ! 



HIGH PRICES DECLINE WHEN DECLINED 




TEMBER 
1st, 
1949 



THESE PATTERNS 
ENCLOSED 




Registered at 
the G.P.O., 
Sydney, for 

transmission 
by post as a 
Newspaper. 




Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



VSD TO ADO TO 
THE FLAVOUK 



THE FLAVOUR 

OFKOLYNOS 

Of/VTAL C&EAM /S 
A SPEC/AL SCIENTIFIC 



TH PALATE 
AMD LEAVES YOVG 
MOVTH COOL 




IN SOUTHERN INDIA IT 
WAS BELIEVED THAT IF 
A PERSON DIED WITH ANY 
FRONT TEETH 

MISSING - 
HIS GHOST 
COULD NEVER 
COME BACK 
AND 

HPOJ/VT- 



A MATS/ OF 8O IN 

H?ANCISCO (US A3 
NEVER HAD A 
DENTAL CAVrrY 
"EVER LOST A 
TOOTH. NEVER 
SEEN TO A 
DENTIST. NEVER 
HAD TOOTHACHE 
AND HIS TEETH ARE 

PEARLY WHITE.* 

G/V6 YOUR TEETH 
LONG, HEALTHY 
UFE- USE ANTISEPTIC 
KOLYNOS 

n~ CHECKS 

DECAY GERMS 




I 

A 



KOLVNOS saves you money 




KOLYNOS IS THE ArtOST . 
ECONOMICAL DENTAL R* 

CREAM BECAUSE IT S _ * 
CONCENTRATED. - 

HALF -AN -INCH 

ON A DRY BRUSH .._ 
IS PLENTY/ \A 

^i.^ t 





<*>> 

%& 

M3B; ^ 



XOIYNOS ClA#$ 07T&? t IHSTK 6&T&J.IAS7S ICWG&? 




Headache? 

They work quickly and safely because, in them, pure 
Aspirin u balanced with Phen<uetin, Caffeine and 
Quinine, the products known to fortify and sustain the 
effects of Aspirin whilst eliminating undesirable after 
effects. 



Take a couple of 



ANACIN 

Tablets instead 




For Safe, Quick relief. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



Family Life. 

A revival of family life is urgently 
necessary in Australia to-day. A renewed 
sense of family responsibility, of family 
unity, must bring fresh strength and hope 
to the nation in these times of difficulty. 
To-day men are at war with each other a 
cold war, as the Communists call it. The 
law of the land is too often treated with 
contempt, and all because there is an 
absolutely wrong outlook on life. Men go 
on strike or leave work over a paltry issue 
without any regard to the privations and 
sorrow and injuries they inflict on their 
fellow men. If family life is good, if 
parents and children have love and affec 
tion for each other, that same family unity 
is reflected in their actions with their 
fellow men. 

Unfortunately, the various amusements 
and distractions and liberties that have 
followed the war have had a bad influence 
on family life, and this is reflected in the 
motto that a great many follow: "Get all 
you can jn whatever way you can, and it 
does not matter who you trample on and 
what injuries you inflict on the way." 

With them the end always justifies the 
method, and so the policy of selfish ruth- 
lessness holds sway. This cannot continue 
always, and must come to a stop which 
can end in both personal and national 
disaster. 

And so we say, let us return to first 
principles good wholesome family life, 
observance of the ten commandments, the 
following of Christian education and pre 
cepts, and observance of the golden rule, 
"Do so to others as you would wish them 
to do to you." 



A sign of the times: The trade in cash 
orders has increased by 13 per cent, this 
year as compared with last. This, it is ex 
plained, is due to increased prices for 
retail clothing. It is also due to the buy 
ing of luxury goods and other non-essentials. 
Firms that formerly refused cash orders 
and lay-byes are now handling them. Also, 
ready cash is a much scarcer commodity. 

A well-known politician tells how, on one 
occasion at a banquet he attended, be was 
listed to reply to a toast. He was not feel 
ing particularly happy about it, and his 
embarrassment was not lessened when the 
master of ceremonies approached him and 
asked in a fairly audible whisper: "Sir 
John, will you make your speech now, or 
will you let the guests enjoy themselves a 
little longer?" 



SUMMER CATALOGUE 

NOW READY 

The "Australian Home Journal" Cata 
logue of Spring and Summer Fashions is 
now available. It covers 40 pages of all 
that is latest and best in fashion designs 
for the new season. The illustrations are 
printed in high-class colour effect. Our 
readers will be pleased with this publica 
tion, which depicts artistically the latest 
designs for the Spring and Summer Sea 
son. All departments of dressmaking are 
catered for; frocks of all kinds for adults 
and children, frocks for different occa 
sions, and frocks for the matron. Sports 
wear, blouses, and undies have been very 
carefully selected. Children s fashions 
girls and boys are allotted a section to 
themselves. Price: Is. 4j|d. (postal note 
I/- and 4|d. in stamps). "Australian 
Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, 
Sydney. 




All leading furniture manufac 
turers are fitting Vono Spring 
Bases to their beds. Or you 
can buy a separate Vono Spring 
Base, put it on your present 
bed, and greatly increase your 
sleeping comfort. At all lead 
ing stores. 



Note this drawing of the Vono Spring Base. Support 
ing cross bars take care of the heavy part of the body 
but are not used under the head or feet, where little 
weight has to be supported. A feeling of resting on 
air results. Any mattress can be used on a Vono 
Spring Base but greatest comfort comes with a Vono 
Inner Spring mattress made in England. 

Buy the bed fitted with the 

VONO 

SPRING BASE 

There is a Vono Spring Base for all standard size beds. 
Don t buy imitations. Look for the name Vono. 

Made in England. 

Sou Australian Agents: Sunge (Aust.) Pt\. Ltd.. 
Sydney. Melbourne. Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 




Cu/mq 9-idtures 

42 Brougham Street, 
EAST SYDNEY. 

Dear Sirs, I am sending you a photograph of my son Denis 
Patrick, at the age of 18 months. I have fed him on ARNOTT S 
MILK ARROWROOT BISCUITS since the age of 6 months and 
he has come on wonderfully well and is now 20i months old 
and weighs 30 Ibs. 8 ozs. (Signed) Mrs. D. Clendenning. 

There is no Substitute for Quality. 



Wonderful FREE BOOK proves there is 

NO NEED TO WEAR GLASSES 

JH.UNDREDS of men, women and young people have 
written to me, worried and fearful about their eyes. 
After reading the amazing free book, " Better Natural 
Sight Without Wearing Glasses," they have found that 
there is a way to regain nori lal vision without the need 
of glasses at all. 

My patients include mei for lie Navy and Air 
Force, and also men qualifying for all trades 
and professions : Civil Aviators, Civil Ser 
vants, Clerks, Motorists, Engineers, Policemen, 
Railwaymen, Engine Drivers people whose 
careers depend upon their eyes. 





Try this simple test 
for ASTIGMATISM. 
To the normal eye 
the width and depth 
of colour in the 
black bars of all 
four circles are uni 
form. When astig 
matism exists there 
is variation in the 
width and depth of 
bars. 



If you suffer from 

SHORT SIGHT LONG SIGHT 

FAILING SIGHT ASTIGMATISM 

TIRED EYES, GLARE, 

TURNED EYES 

STRAIN EYE HEADACHES 

or any other eye weakness (except 

diseased eyes) write for my BOOK 

or call for free consultation at 

EYESIGHT TRAINING 

(Ferguson System) 

Room 604H, Manchester Unity Bldg. 
185 Elizabeth St., Sydney. MA.5455 

* 

HOW TO GET MY BOOK FREE 
Just write (enclosing 2Jd. postage) or 
call TO-DAY for 32-page Free 
Booklet, "Better Natural Sight With 
out Wearing Glasses" This includes 
testimonials from happy people who have 
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avenue of hope for you. 

FREE CONSULTATION 
Ring MA 5455 for Free Consultation. 



Heart to Heart 



Hard-hearted Parents: 

"I go to business and have a good posi 
tion in an insurance company, but my 
parents make it very hard for me to save 
money. They charge me 2 per week for 
board and lodging. I think this is ex- 
horbitant, but they say as I am earning a 
good salary that is little enough to pay. 
They are reasonably well-to-do, and have 
their own home. I am 22 years old and 
can, of course, leave home if I want to. 
Do you think they are unsympathetic in 

their treatment of me?" Maude G. 

No, I do not think so. If you left home 
you could not get as good value for your 
2 anywhere else. You must remember in 
these days of high wages ^he cost of living 
meat, groceries, bread, milk, gas, electric 
light have also gone up. Also, your parents 
have spent a lot in your general education, 
plus your commercial training. Like many 
other parents, they no doubt had to screw 
and save and do without things in order 
that you should qualify for a commercial 
position. There is no reason why they 
should keep you when you are fully capable 
of keeping yourself. In fact, you should 
be glad you are now enabled, in part, to 
recoup them for the monies they have ex 
pended on your behalf. I think your 
attitude is selfish. Even after paying your 
folks board and lodging money you will 
have at least 3 over, which is not bad 
going. I know plenty of girls living out 
who cannot manage on 2 per week, 

He Keeps Away: 

"I have a boy friend of whom I am very 
fond, but his conduct at times causes me 
misgivings. When we come home from the 
pictures or a dance he gets somewhat 
fresh . I think you know what I mean. I 
object strongly to being manicured in this 
way. I told him so and said that if he 
continued that kind of treatment he should 
keep away altogether. That was a month 
ago. and I have not seen him since. I am 
sorry because, apart from this fault, he is 
really a very likeable lad. Did I do 

right?" Amelia. Of course you did. No 

respectable girl would stand for that sort 
of thing. Also, if the boy friend had 
respect for you he would not attempt such 
conduct. If he stays away altogether his 
absence will be no loss to you. I am not a 
prude by any means, but loose conduct of 
this kind should not be tolerated by any 
decent girl. 

Being Domesticated: 

"I am being married in three months 
time, but I am not a bit domesticated, as I 
have been engaged in office work, and 
before that my people kept a guest-house, 
and meals and service were always avail 
able. Do you think I should postpone the 
marriage till I have some sound training in 
cooking and domestic affairs?" Edith C. 

Certainly not. If you are possessed of 

ordinary intelligence it would be wrong to 
postpone happiness because you are not 
domesticated. Eunning a house is a matter 
of plain commonsense and gumption and 
the ability to do work where work has to 
be done. As for cooking, start off with 
simple dishes, get the help of some of your 
married friends, and follow carefully the 
instructions in a good plain cookery book. 
You could even attend daytime cookery 
classes at the Gas Company or the Electri 
city Dept., or the Technical College. So 
you have plenty of opportunities for acquir 
ing cookery knowledge. Do not let these 
things be a bugbear. Go right ahead with 
the marriage preparations. Kemember, a 
postponed marriage may never eventuate. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



A Changeling: 

"Can I get your help? I am engaged to 
a really nice and agreeable girl. A few 
weeks ago we visited her aunt s home, and 
there I met her cousin. The moment I saw 
the cousin I knew she was the only girl 
in the world for me, and I am sure the 
cousin felt the same way. It was very 
definitely love at first sight on both sides. 
This girl has come into my life and I can 
never do without her. I have spoken to 
the cousin and she feels the same way. I 
know I feel a cad, but what can I do?" 

C.G.B. A most unhappy situation, and 

it seems to me somewhat unreal. In any 
case, see your fiancee as soon as possible, 
and make a frank statement in asking for 
your release. She will no doubt be glad to 
get rid of you. What will happen to you 
if this cousin is so indiscreet as to visit 
another cousin? Maybe another love-at- 
first-sight episode. 

A Bad Lot: 

"I am very friendly with a young lady 
of good family and I have every reason to 
think she is fond of me. I don t want to 
let our friendship go too far, as our family 
history is not too good, and I feel I should 
disclose this. My elder brother is a real 
bad lot. He has been in gaol several times 
and really should be declared an habitual 
criminal. He has brought disgrace on the 
family on several occasions, so much 
so that we have given up visiting acquaint 
ances, as there is always a restraint about 
the conversation and we feel they are not 
anxious for us to call. Is it my duty to 
make the lady acquainted with these 

facts?" David G. Most certainly. It 

is hard on you and the other members of 
your family, but it always happens that 
the chief sufferer is not the evil-doer. The 
principal repercussion is against entirely 
innocent folks. It is a stigma on your 
family from which you must suffer. Give 
all the facts to the young lady, and you 
must expect that both she and her parents 
will break off the friendship. It may 
sound to you a snobbish solution, but as 
the world is constituted to-day people have 
no wish to be associated with the relatives 
of criminals. 

Inferiority Complex: 

"I am slightly lame and that has always 
made me shy and sensitive, and, not being 
strong like other girls, I have developed an 
inferiority complex; always content to keep 
in the background. No one ever seems to 
take notice of me, and I am quite happy 
to let it remain so. For some months now 
I have been friendly with a man I meet on 
the train each morning. He would be 
about six or seven years older than me. 
We have been out together to the pictures, 
and to several football matches. Now, to 
my surprise, he has proposed to me. He is 
in a good financial position, and holds down 
an excellent job. I have just looked on 
him as a good pal who was putting some 
enjoyment my way. Now he is anxious 
to marry me, and when I point out that I 
am lame, he says that does not matter at 
all, and there is no one else in the world 
for him. Do you think I should accept 
him, handicapped as I am? I would want 
to make him a good wife. I have been 
well trained by my mother, who thought 
that a business life was not for me, and I 
became chief cook and bottle-washer at 
home. My lameness is very slight." 

Mary F. 1 think Dame Fortune has 

been very kind to you, and you should 
accept the gift she offers. The man evi 
dently loves you very much. Forget all 
about yourself and your physical defect. 
I feel sure you will both be very happy. 



World famous baritone 




h 




says: 



"Horlicks and I are old friends. 

I ve found it the most nourishing of ail 

food drinks. 11 



Peter Dawson and Horlicks are 
life-long friends. Peter says: 
"Wherever I go in the British Em 
pire I enjoy my Horlicks. I find 
it helps to keep me going in top 
form. And, believe me, a concert 
artist needs to be fit all the 
time." 

Just like Peter Dawson, you II 
enjoy the delicious, distinctive 
flavour of Horlicks. And, like 
Peter, you ll find that Horlicks 
will give you extra energy. 
The full, satisfying flavour of 
Horlicks comes from a careful 



blend of fresh, full-cream milk 
and the nutritive extracts of 
malted barley and wheat. It is 
Nature s flavour . . . that s why 
you never tire of it. 

Many people drink Horlicks 
simply because they enjoy that 
distinctive flavour. Others drink 
Horlicks because they need it to 
build them up ... to nourish the 
body and nerves . . . and to induce 
deep, refreshing sleep. But 
whatever the reason everyone 
enjoys Horlicks. It is equally 
delicious hot or cold. 



Rich in these food values 




when mined as directed 



Ask your storekeeper for 

HORLICKS 

the delicious, 
NOURISHING food drink 

8-oz.tin 2 r 2 16-oz.tin 

Prices slightly higher in country areas 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 




Well-known society leader reveals beauty 

"pick-up" for special occasions 




Mrs. Nicholas R. du Pont, charming 
American society beauty has dramatically 
beautiful coloring . . . platinum blonde 
hair, china-blue eyes, ivory-white skin. 
Mrs. du Pont says: "The 1 -Minute Mask 
of Pond s Vanishing Cream brightens my 
complexion in one minute ! Makes my 
skin look clearer and glowing right away. 
Smoother too, with a soft, silky finish 
that takes make-up to perfection." 



How to apply the 1-Minute Mask 



1. Smooth a cool white mask of Pond s over your 
whole Vanishing Cream face except eyes. 

2. Instantly the "keratolytic" action of Pond s Vanish 
ing Cream starts to loosen dried skin flakes. Dissolves 
them off. 

3. After just one minute, tissue off clean. Your skin 
has come to life . . . looks brighter, fresher, feels adorably 
sefter. 



POND S VANISHING CREAM 




To Correspondents 

[The columns of this department for the answers to 
correspondents are designed to prove of genuine help and 
benefit to readers who desire information concerning, 
matters of dress, housekeeping, etiquette, the toilet, or 
hygiene. In addition to the proper signature (which will 
never be published under any circumstances), corre 
spondents are requested to send a pen-name, to which 
the answer may be addressed.] 

MULLIGATAWNY Soup. Eequired: Two- 
quarts of stock or water, 3 ozs. of split 
peas, 3 onions (or leeks), 2 carrots and 
turnips, a bunch of herbs, salt, pepper, 
curry powder; if possible, a few bacon* 
rinds or trimmings. Wash and prepare the 
carrots and turnips, and cut them into small 
pieces. Peel and slice the onions. Put all 
the vegetables in a large saucepan with 
the stock or water. Add the herbs and 
bacon rinds, all tied together, having first 
washed and scraped the latter. Bring all to> 
the boil. Add about a tablespoonful of 
curry powder more or less according to> 
taste and mix smoothly and thinly with a 
little cold water. Add to the vegetables, 
stirring until the soup thickens slightly. 
Season, put the lid on the pan and let the 
contents boil steadily until the carrot is- 
tender, then take out the herbs and bacon 
rinds and rub the rest through a sieve. 
This, of course, is not necessary, but it is< 
quicker than mashing the vegetables with 
a spoon, and the result is far better. Rinse 
out the pan, put back the soup and bring it 
to the boil. See if the curry flavour is as> 
you like it if more curry is liked mix it 
smoothly with a little cold liquid before 
adding it, and let the soup boil again after 
adding the curry. Boiled rice is an im 
provement to this soup, besides adding 
extra nourishment to it. Miss McW. 

FASTING. There is much to be said in, 
favour of fasting, particularly in your 
case, where you suffer from stomach dis 
orders. Fasting is at times the best medi 
cine, the means of removing incipient: 
disease, and restoring to the body its usual 
healthful sensations. Howard Franklin, 
often fasted one day in the week; and 
Bonaparte, when his system was unstrung, 
omitted his wonted meal, and took exer 
cise on horseback as his only remedies. 
Bondi. 

SARDINE CANAPES. Mash some sardines* 
to a paste and flavour with Worcestershire 
sauce and cayenne. Fry some rounds of 
bread, drain well, and when cold spread 
with the sardine mixture. JJtone some 
olives and fill with the sardine mixture 
and place one on each crouton. Sprinkle 
round the edge some finely chopped white 
of a hard-boiled egg. B.M. 

SYRUP AND POTATO PUDDING (this can be- 
steamed or baked). Required: ^ Ib. of 
mashed potato, 4 ozs. of plain flour, 2 ozs. 
of chopped suet or dripping, 2 ozs. of stale 
breadcrumbs, \ teaspoonful of bicarbonate 
of soda, 3 tablespoonsful of syrup or 
treacle, a little water or fruit juice. Mix 
together the flour, fat, crumbs and soda,, 
then add the potatoes lightly. Mix the 
syrup with 3 tablespoonsful of water or 
juice, and stir into the flour, etc., adding 
as much more liquid as is needed to moisten 
the mixture (it should drop heavily fronv 
the spoon). Press the mixture into a 
greased basin, cover it with greased paper 
and steam for 3 hours, or make the mixture 
rather moister, turn it into a greased pie- 
dish or baking-tin and bake for from 1 to- 
\\ hours. (Regulo 5; Electric 400 deg.). 
A cheap and good winter sweet. Mrs. 
E. C. 

TOMATO ROLLS. Ingredients: 1 egg, 1 
tomato, \ oz. butter, salt and pepper, tea* 
rolls. Peel and cut up the tomato and put 
into a saucepan with the whipped egg and 
butter. Simmer until thick, beating all 



Australian Home Journal, beptember 



the time to make a smooth paste. Se asou 
with salt and pepper, and when cold spread 
thickly between buttered rolls. Nora M. 
STALE CAKE. "We often have pieces of 
stale cake left over, and the children won t 
at it when it becomes hard. Can you sug 
gest how this cake may be used up? I 
hate to see food wasted." Mrs. B. 



Soak the cake in milk until thoroughly 
moist, then grate some nutmeg over it and 
.add a tablcspoonful of golden syrup. Put 
the mixture into a pudding-bowl and steam 
for 1 to 1^ hours. Serve with custard. 

BARLEY CREAM (for the Invalid). Take 
2 Ibs. of lean veal, free from fat or skin, 
cut it into pieces the size of a nutmeg, and 
put it into a stewpan with \ Ib. of pearl 
barley and 2 quarts of water, let it simmer 
till reduced to half the quantity, then rub 
it through a sieve, add salt to taste. It 
should be the consistency of thick cream. 
Nurse F. 

CLEANING BLACK LACE. First brush the 
dust from it carefully, then sponge it with 
either gin or green tea or sal volatile and 
water 1 oz. to a pint of water. Put it in 
a towel and squeeze it but do not wring it. 
Fill a bottle with hot water and wind the 
lace round it. Leave till dry but do not 
iron it. Mrs. E. G. 

STEWED MUSHROOMS. Eequired: Half a 
Ib. of mushrooms, f of a pint of milk, 1 oz. 
of butter, a heaped tablespoonful of flour, 
salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Peel, stalk 
and examine the mushrooms. Put them in 
a saucepan with the milk and simmer until 
tender. Melt the butter, mix with the 
flour smoothly and add a little cold milk; 
add to the hot milk and mushrooms and 
stir over the fire until the sauce boils well 
and thickens. Season it to taste with salt, 
pepper and lemon juice. Serve it on a 
hot dish with sippets of fried bread or 
toast. Emily H. 

GARNISHING. A pretty garnish adds 
greatly to the appetising appearance of a 
dish. Fried fish, cutlets, rissoles and cold 
meats of any kind should always be gar 
nished with sprigs of fresh parsley, nicely 
washed and dried, and thin slices of lemon, 
or with parsley finely minced. Scalding for 
a minute in very hot water gives the pars- 
Icy a bright green colour. Slices of lemon 
may be used whole or cut in halves or 
quarters. Fried croutons, or sippets of 
toast, are used for hot dishes which are 
served with gravy. Henrietta. 

SCORCHED LINEN. To restore, extract the 
juice of two peeled onions by pounding 
them, mix with the juice \ pint of vinegar, 
\ oz. of white soap cut into small pieces, 
and 2 ozs. of Fuller s earth. Boil this 
composition well, and, when cool, spread it 
on the scorched part of the linen; let it 
remain till dry, and afterwards wash the 
linen. Avon. 

WILLIAM PENN was an English Quaker, 
born in London, and founder of Penn 
sylvania. He spent several periods of 
imprisonment writing books in defence of 
religious liberty. Later on his friendship 
with King James II brought many advan 
tages to the Quakers. There are several 
books of his life published. Sue. 

BAKED EGG WITH SPINACH AND CHEESE. 
Half cupful chopped cooked spinach, 3 
tablespoonsful grated cheese, 1 egg, salt 
and pepper, ^ cupful medium white sauce, 
1 slice bread (cubed), 1 teaspoonful 
margarine. Place spinach in an in 
dividual casserole and sprinkle with half 
the cheese. Press a hollow into the spinach 
and drop an egg into it. Sprinkle with 
salt and pepper, add white sauce and re 
maining cheese. Top with bread cubes and 
dot with bits of margarine. Bake in a slow 
oven till egg is set, about 10 minutes. 
Serves one. E.E.K. 



HER RHEUMATISM GOES AS SHE LOSES UGLY FAT 

Great London Hospital endorses famous Youth-0-Form 

"For many years," says Mrs. Fitzpatrick, "I have been crippled with rheumatism, 
until some friends recommended me to take Youth-O-Form to reduce my weight. 
I DID REDUCE and, more marvellous still, my rheumatism completely disappeared. 
That was four years ago. The London winter I find very severe, and this year I 
got rheumatism badly again, and all the prescriptions were useless. I told my doctor, 
who is leading physician at one of the big hospitals here, that Youth-O-Form was 
the only thing that ever did me any good, and he advised me to try it again, and 
that the Youth-O-Form prescription was 
well known. Once again I am quite well 
and fit." 

If you are overweight and 

suffer from Rheumatism, 

Indigestion, Constipation, 

or constant headaches, 

Youth-O-Form will help 

you, too. 



Mrs. Darley, pictured below, is only 
one of countless Australian women 
who have regained health and appear 
ance through Youth-O-Form. 



WHAT YOU SHOULD WEIGH 


Height 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-40 


ft. in. 


st. Ib. 


st. Ib. 


st. Ib. | st. Ib. 


St. lt> 


4 11 


7 5 


7 8 


7 11 


8 


8 3 


5 


7 7 


7 10 


7 13 


8 2 


8 5 


5 1 


7 9 


7 12 


8 1 


8 4 


8 7 


5 2 


7 12 


8 1 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


5 3 


8" 1 


8 4 


8 6 


8 9 


8 13 


5 4 


8 4 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


5 5 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


9 7 


5 6 


8 11 


9 


9 3 


9 7 


11 


5 7 


9 1 


9 4 


9 7 


9 11 


10 1 


5 8 


9 5 


9 8 


9 11 


10 1 


10 5 


Add 3lb. for every five years ever forty. 




Youth-O-Form is pleasant, effective, per 
manent and easy to take. 
Yuu can get the six weeks Youth-O-Form 
Treatment for 20/- (or a 10-day 
Carton, 5/6) from your nearert 
Chemist. 

If far from a Chemist, pin 
a Postal Note to a piece of 
paper with your name and 
address; send it to Britisb 
Medical Laboratories, 
Box 4155, G.P.O., Syd 
ney, and your Youth-O- 
Form will reach 
you by return mall 
plainly wrapped 
and with full 
irectiona for 

Y44 




The Doctor Answers 

Patient: "But why should I have Rheumatism, Doctor?" 

Doctor: "Well, Rheumatism can be. caused by two things: 
an injury to a joint or muscle or by an accumulation 
of poisons in the blood stream which is a condition 
we call toxaemia. Thousands of people like yourself, 
in the last few years, have overworked and neg 
lected their health, letting poisons collect in the 
blood stream so that the ranks of sufferers from 
Rheumatism have increased enormously." 

Patient: "But, Doctor, how do these poisons accumulate?" 

Doctor: "Your blood is constantly flowing through your 
kidneys to be purified from uric acid and other 
poisons. If your kidneys fail to do this, these poisons circulate back through 
your body and collect in the muscles and joints, causing the aches and 
pains that most people call Rheumatism." 

Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids help drive out the crippling poisons from your blood 
stream that are the cause of Rheumatic aches and pains; your kidneys are cleansed 
and strengthened and you get a new feeling of good health and energy. 

If you suffer from Rheumatic pains, backache, sciatica, lumbago, kidney and bladder 
weaknesses, neuritis, gout, etc., start a course of Menthoids right away. 

Get a month s treatment flask of Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids for 6/6 with Diet Chart, 
or a 12-day flask for 3/6, from your nearest chemist or store, or a postal note to 
British Medical Laboratories, Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney, will bring you Menthoids 
by return mail. 

Mil 

MENTHOIDS FOR RHEUMATISM 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 




What other 
does ALL this? 



CLEARS STUFFY NOSE! 
SOOTHES SORE THROAT! 
EASES ACHY CHEST! 
CALMS RASPY COUGH! 



mbbecfon at bedtime - 
WORKS OUTSIDE 

His chest, back and 




WORKS 




VapoRub s deep-reaching ore clear in g the nose, 

poukice action eases achy air ^ ^ easmg 

tightness and helps ; break uf bother some cough, 
congestion. Feels so fi( 




INSIDE 



With every breath, 
smeaicmal 





Just as the name Paul Storr stands for excellence in 
silver craftsmanship, so the name Goddard s stands 
for excellence in silver polishes. Australian house 
wives will welcome the return of these fine polishes 
to restore the beauty of their silverware. 



Goddard s Silver Polishes 



Plate Powder Silver Polish 



Silver Cloths 





ARE YOU SLOWLY 
POISONING YOURSELF? 

Remove the Cause 

WHEN waste matter is allowed 
to accumulate in the colon it haa 
three effects. It weakens the 
muscular power of the body to 
remove it. It creates poisonous 
products which through the cir 
culation reach every cell in the 
body. It forms a breeding- 
ground for germs by the mil 
lions. That is the reason high 
authority to-day regards consti 
pation as primarilv respor^ hle 
for eighty-five cases in every 
hundred of serious illness. Wny 
cr>poi a list,? all over the world 
have made internal cleanness 
their slogan. 

Coloseptic overcomes the pos 
sibility of Autoxima from the 
words auto (self), toxin (poison) 
by inducing better Internal 
Cleanness. 

Coloseptic Is the product of in 
tensive research to find a remedy 
which would combat constipa 
tion at its source, the colon 

A level teaspoonful in a glass 
of water morning or night, once 
or twice a week, is sufficient after 
perfect relief is obtained 

COLOSEPTIC 

FOR BETTER 
INTERNAL CLEANNESS 

At all chemists and stores. 

4333 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



on 120 sis. and work in st.-st. for 20 rows, 
ending with a p. row. Now, still working 
in st.-st., dec. 1 st. at each 
end of next row and every 
following 4th row until 
100 sts. remain. 

Work 9 rows straight 
after last dec., ending 
with a p. row. Now inc. 1 
st. at each end of next 




SPRING WAISTCOAT 



Step straight into spring in this gay 
little waistcoat, with its plain back and 
checked fronts. The original was made in 
eunny green and daffodil yellow. 

Materials: 6 ozs. 3-ply wool (3 ozs. each 
colour); 1 pair each No. 10 and No. 12 
knitting needles; 5 small buttons. 

Tension: 8 stitches and 10 rows to 1 
inch on No. 10 needles. 

Measurements: To fit a 34-inch bust; 
length from shoulder to lower edge, 21 
inches; waist, 24 inches. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st., 
stitch; sts., stitches: rep., repeat; tog., 
together; inc., increase (by working twice 
into the same st. before slipping it off left- 
hand needle); dec., decrease (by taking 2 
sts. tog.); patt., pattern; M., main; C., 
contrast; st.-st., stocking-stitch. 
The Back. 

With No. 10 needles and M. wool, cast 



row and every following 4th row until sts. 
number 136. Work 7 rows straight after 
last inc., ending with a p. row. 

To shape armholes cast off 8 sts. at start 
of next 2 rows, then dec. 1 st. at each end 
of next 9 rows (102 sts.). Work 59 rows 
straight, ending with a p. row. To shape 
shoulders cast off 12 sts. at start of next 6 
rows. Cast off remaining 30 sts. for back 
neck. 

The Eight Front. 

With No. 10 needles and M. wool cast 
on 36 sts. and work 2 rows st.-st. Join on 
C. Next row: With M. inc. 1 st. in 1st st., 
k. 3 M., * 4 C., 4 M.; rep. from * to last 4 
sts., 4 C. Next row: P. 4 C., 4 M. all along 
row to last st., inc. 1 st. in this. Rep. last 
2 rows once more. Now continue the front 
increasings on every row until there are 54 
sts., but on every 5th row reverse the 
colour sequence of the squares. When there 



o-Q- 

are 54 sts., continue as follows, always 
working in square pattern: 

Next row: Inc. 1 st. in 1st st., work in 
patt. to last 2 sts., take 2 tog. Work 3 
rows in pattern, increasing at front edge 
on each row. Next row: Inc. 1 st. in 1st 
st., work in patt. to last 2 sts., take 2 tog. 
Next row: Work in patt. to last st., inc. iu 
this. Work 2 rows in patt. without shap 
ing. 

Now, keeping front edge straight, con 
tinue in patt. but dec. 1 st. at end of next 
row and every following 4th row until 50 
sts. remain. Work 9 rows straight in patt., 
ending with a p. row. Now inc. 1 st. at 
end of next row and every following 4th 
row until there are 68 sts. Work 8 rows 
straight after last inc., ending with a k-. 
row. 

To shape armhole, cast off 8 sts. at start, 
of next row, then dec. 1 st. at same edge 
on each of the next 9 rows (51 sts.). Work 
3 rows straight after last dec., ending with 
a p. row. To shape front edge, dec. 1 st.. 
at start of next row and every following 
4th row until only 36 sts. remain. 

Shape shoulder by casting off 12 sts. at. 
start of next 2 rows which commence from 
armhole end, work 1 row, then cast off re 
maining 12 sts. Work the left front to 
correspond but reverse all shapings. 
The Front Strapping. 

With No. 12 needles and C. wool cast 
on 24 sts. and work 4 inches in 
st.-st. Make a double buttonhole on next 
2 rows thus: Next row: K. 6, cast off 4, 
k. 4, cast off 4, k. 6. Next row: P. 6, cast 
on 4, p. 4, cast on 4, p. 6. **Work 2| 
inches st.-st., then work the 2 buttonhole 
rows again. Rep. from ** 3 times, making 
5 buttonholes in all. 

Now, continuing in st.-st. until strap is 
long enough to go up right front, along 
back neck (where it should be slightly 
stretched on) and down left front. 

The Armhole Strapping. 

(Two pieces alike.) 

With No. 12 needles and C. wool, east oa 
24 sts. and work in st.-st. until strap is 
long enough to go all round armhole. 

To Complete. 

Press all sections from wrong side with 
a hot iron over a damp cloth. Join shoulder 
and side seams. Fold the front strapping 
in half, lengthwise, so that the two sets of 
buttonholes come exactly over each other, 
and stitch strapping to fronrts. Work round 
buttonholes with matching thread. Fold 
the armhole straps in half lengthwise and 
stitch round armholes. Add buttons to left 
front strap. 

+ * 

Britain has so little natural oil or oil- 
bearing shale and finds so many difficulties 
in the development of oil from coal that, 
in the near future, she has no real alter 
native to oil from overseas. Her needs*, 
and those of a world at peace, are no less 
great than in times of war. So the search* 
for oil in a score of lands across the world 
goes on. 



A cart was ambling along a country road 
one dark night. A large ear was approach 
ing in the opposite direction. The driver 
of the car dipped his glaring headlights to 
avoid dazzling the carrier. 

"George," said the carrier to hia mate, 
"we must return the compliment. Just 
blow that offside candle out." 



10 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 



Married at Gretna Green 



By A. EEYNOLDS COOPEE. 



* To be married at Gretna Green! Could 

- there be anything more exciting more 
..romantic in the whole world? 

Peggy Brown had to pinch herself to 
make sure she was awake, not dreaming 
. that she was being married to the man at 
.her side. 

She looked round the dark Smithy, lit 
only by a lantern. How thrilled Aunt 

Maggie, who had brought her up, would be 
when she heard all about it. This kindly 
4 old maid was largely responsible for 

Peggy s romantic 

ideas. From her 

earliest years, the 



"Confound the fellows," Keggie exploded 
to the man who had performed the cere 
mony. "How did they knew we were to 
be married this evening?" 

"Bless you, sir, they weren t expecting 
to see a stranger married. They expected 
a runaway couple from London. Miss 
Sprott, the American heiress. But she 
changed her mind at the last minute. So 
they took you instead. You and your young 
lady may be front page news." The man 
laughed heartily, and seemed surprised that 





off her feet. He was going away for his 
firm and he had urged her to marry him 
before he went. And there was Gretna 
Green only a few miles way. What girl 
could resist? 

But, as the minutes passed and Curzon 
had not returned, somehow Peggy felt a 
little flat. The rain was falling in real 
earnest now, splashing up on her new silk 
stockings. 

What could be keeping him? She glanced 
at her wrist watch, his present to her. 
Goodness, he had been gone more than half 
an hour. She began to feel frightened. 
Had something happened to him? But 
how could it? The garage was only just 
around the corner. The best thing would be 
to go there and enquire. 

But at the garage most dis 
quieting news awaited her. 

"Young gent with an Austin?" 
said the mechanic there; "why, 
yes, he came in, must be about 
forty minutes ago. Filled his 
tank and went off south. Took a 
couple of tins with him as well. 
Said he d a long journey in front 
of him." 



: girl could recall 
seeing her aunt 
buried in some 

novel or journal. She herself 

. had caught the habit, and 

. had lived in a world of 

.handsome heroes who rescued poor but 

, -beauteous maidens. 

. -She made the responses in a low, shy 

. voice said the words that made her the 

. wife of the dark, good-looking man stand 
ing next to her. 

"There, my darling, it s all over," he 

said, bending down to kiss her; "you are 

.no longer Peggy Brown, but Mrs. Eeginald 

.. Curzon. Come along, pet." 

r Then, as they passed through the door 
way, a brilliant flash of light made Peggy 

/jump. She thought she heard Eeggie say 
a strong word. Some reporters had taken 
their photos. 



There, my Darl 
ing, it s all 
over." he said. 



the newlywed husband didn t join in. But 
he only scowled angrily. 

"Come along," he said curtly to Peggy; 
"let s get out of this. Stand in this door 
way while I get the car from the garage." 

Obediently, Peggy stood where she was 
told, watching the rain which had com 
menced to fall. She saw her bus, the last 
one that night, go by, and was glad she 
wasn t dependent on it to get back home. 

She wasn t going to have her honey 
moon just yet. Eeggie couldn t get away 
from business for a while. 

But his wooing had been so passionate 
so tempestuous that he had whirled her 



Peggy stood for a few 
moments outside the 
garage, utterly bewildered. What could 
it mean? At last reason told her the best 
thing to do would be to get back home. 

But how? The last bus had gone and 
it was a walk of more than ten miles, 
unless she could get a lift tm the way. 

So, making the best of things, Peggy 
started her long tramp. But, as her excite 
ment faded, she grew more and more tired. 

And wet! She had never been so wet 
in all her life. Hearing the sound of a 
car behind her, she stood in the middle of 
the road, hands outstretched. 

With a grinding of brakes, the car, a 
most dilapidated old one, stopped and a 
man got out. His face, bright and youth 
ful, seemed faintly familiar to Peggy. And 
as he saw her in the light of his lamps, 
she saw that he recognised her, too. 

"Why, Great Scott, if it isn t our little 
bride from Gretna Green! What in the 
world are you doing here? And alone I 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



11 



Are you are you by any chance running 
a way?" 

And poor Peggy was too overwrought 
and weary to keep her own council. 

"No, it is my husband who is doing the 
running away," she said bitterly. "And I 
want to get to Wynlough. So I thought if 
you were going that way . . . But, who 
are you? How is it you know me?" 

"I had the pleasure shared with an 
other fellow of taking your photo as you 
came out from your wedding a while back." 

"Why, then, you re a reporter! Peggy 
shrank away from him as if he were some 
thing dangerous. "Oh!" she said blankly, 
and after a moment s pause went on hur 
riedly: "I don t think I ll trouble you 
after all. I don t want all my troubles 
made public." 

"Don t you be a silly little girl. Just 
you hop into the car and you ll be at Wyn 
lough in no time. And see here, I won t 
write a thing about you that you don t 
want me to. Not even publish the portrait 
if you d rather I didn t. Though, of 
course, the other paper will have it in," he 
finished, a trifle regretfully. 

With a quick look at hig face, Peggy 
got into the car and they drove off through 
the rain. Soon they were passing through 
the little town of Wynlough and Jimmy 
Vane glanced at his passenger. She had 
been very silent and, guessing something 
of what she was going through, he had not 
spoken either. In the light of a street 
lamp he could see she was deadly white 
and shaking. 

"Look here, little girl," he exclaimed, 
"I m going to stop and get you a cup of 
scalding coffee. You re just about all in." 

He pulled up at a cafe, and soon Peggy 
was sipping gratefully the steaming drink. 

"That s better. Now eat a few mouths- 
ful of the poached egg or I won t touch 
mine. And I m simply starving." 

Gradually some colour came back to the 
girl s face and Jimmy thought what a 
sweet little thing she was. . Not strictly 
speaking pretty, perhaps; but the big, dark 
eyes, set widely apart in the heart-shaped 
face, were beautiful. In strong contrast 
to the fair tendrils of hair peeping out 
from under her beret. 

"Why don t you tell me about things?" 
Jimmy spoke persuasively; he felt it 
would do her good to open her heart a 
little. "I promise you honest injun I 
won t print it. Though it would make a 
wonderful story. But I won t." 

Peggy looked at him in silence for a 
minute, her eyes searching his face. 

"Yes, I d like to tell you," she decided. 
"I have no one I can ask what to do. 
Only Aunt Maggie, and now I d rather she 
didn t know about it." She sighed deeply. 
"Not until things come right, that is. If 
they ever do." 

"They will come right, sure enough," 
Jimmy affirmed, "but tell me all about it. 
Had you known your husband long? And 
why^the wedding at Gretna Green?" 

"No, I hadn t known Reggie any time, 
not to speak to, that is. He is a traveller 
for a fancygoods firm, and he called at 
our house. Oh, I didn t tell you I m a 
companion-help to a lady near Wynlough. 
FTe came to see if I would like to buy a 
wrist-watch." 

She glanced at her wrist with a sigh. 

"And, after all, he gave it to me. Be 
cause he he, well, he said he fell in love 
with me that very first day." 

"I m not surprised at that," Jimmy put 
in. And somehow he didn t sound as if he 
were trying to flatter her. "And you re 



turned his affection, I suppose. Else you 
wouldn t have married him." 

"I thought I did," said Peggy slowly. 
"You see, it was a sort of romance in 
itself, meeting him like that. Directly 1 
saw him I knew him. He s the son of a 
man in the town I come from, the other 
side of Gretna Green. Reggie waa sup 
posed to be a bit wild in those days. Then 
one day he went away, and I didn t see 
him again till he came to our place. I 
didn t tell him I knew who he was till he 
asked me if I recognised him, and I said 
I did. But we didn t have much time for 
talking. It was all so sudden." 

"Why? What was the reason for the 
hurry?" 

"He d got to go abroad for his firm. 
Might be away for three months, perhaps 
longer. And he said he couldn t rest if I 
were free to pick up with someone else. 
And he was so good looking and so gener 
ous well, ho just talked me over." 

"But why Gretna Green?" 

"It was the only place. We couldn t 
have got married anywhere else in the 
time. You see, all this took place under a 
fortnight. And it did seem so so lovely 
to be married there. I kept picturing to 
myself what Auntie would say when 1 
told her. She so dearly loves a bit of 
romance." 

"You poor little kid! But go on." 

"That s about all. After the wedding 
Reg was going to drive me home; I ve 
only got the evening off. When we came 
out of the Smithy after the photos were 
taken he went to the garage to get his 
car. And he didn t come back. The man 
there said he drove off Londonwards. Oh, 
dear, whatever can it mean?" 

"There s sure to be some explanation. 
You ll hear to-morrow, for sure. Try not 
to worry. Now, I suppose we d better 
get along. Just where is your place?" 
Jimmy asked as soon as they were on their 
way again. 

"It s a house called Rosele.V, about three 
miles on." 

"Why, isn t Unit the place where" the 
burglary was a mdnth ago? The poor old 
lady there was blinded by the wretch who 
broke in." 

"Yes, that s the place. It was my mis 
tress who was hurt; Mrs. Garland her name 
is. I was away on my holidays at the 
time. Mrs. Garland s niece was staying 
with lu;r, and she walked right in on the 
man." 

"Why, it said in the report that it was 
the maid who nearly caught him." 

"I know; it was a mistake. It was Miss 
Vera Garland." 

"Did she actually see him, as they said; 
his face, I mean?" 

"Yes, distinctly. She says she d know 
him anywhere." 

"I wonder he didn t turn on her, attack 
her." 

"She had a pistol. A real one, not an 
ammonia one like his. Hearing a noise. Miss 
Vera seized her gun she s a good shot 
and ran into the bedroom. She turned her 
flashlight right on to him, so I suppose he 
didn t see her properly. He may have 
thought she was a man. Anyway, he just 
turned and jumped out of the window, 
otherwise she might have caught him. And 
now. it s the next place on the left." 

"Well, I hope you have good news very 
soon. May I call one day to know how 
you get on?" 

Peggy hesitated a moment. 

"Very well. But mind you come to the 
back door. I m only a servant, really, you 
know." And the smile that shone for a 



second on her worried face showed Jimmy 
what a pretty girl she must be when she 
was happy. 

* * 

As Peggy slipped into the kitchen, ahe 
was sorry to see that Vera Garland was 
waiting there. Vera was a hard-faced 
woman nearing forty. She looked from 
Peggy to the clo^k on the wall and back 
again. 

"You re very late," she said sonrly. "1 
heard the bus go by an hour ago at 
least." 

"Yes, I know. I missed it and waa afraid 
I d have to walk all the way, and it s pour-, 
ing. But a motorist kindlv gave ice a 
lift." 

"Why, \vhero were you, then?" 

"I went to Gretna Green." 

"Really! I suppose you wandered round 
the Smithy trying to picture yourself as a 
blushing bride." Vera s thick, greedy- 
looking lips curled in a sneer. 

Peggy s face flushed vividly, but she did 
not answer and the other went ou: 

"I don t know what my aunt will say 
when she hears you let yourself be picked 
up by ft stranger. She s not used to the 
ways of the girls of to-day." 

"I ll explain to Mrs. Garland when I 
take up her malted milk," Peggy said 
coldly as she went to get a saucepan. 

"My aunt had her milk at the proper 
time, Vera said spitefully. "It doesn t 
do to keep an invalid like her waiting till 
you condescend to come in. But you can 
cut me some sandwiches and bring them 
into the dining-room." 

. Peggy sighed as the woman went off. 
She understood why Vera disliked her. 
She had come here to look after her aunt 
while Peggy was away on her holiday. Mrs. 
Garland, even before the affair with the 
burglar, had been very frail. Then, when 
her eyes were so badly injured, she had to 
get Vera to see to various business matters 
for her. And the younger woman found 
out two things: One that the old lady was 
far better off than had been thought, and 
the other that she intended to leave a 
large portion of her money to Peggy in 
return for the girl s attention. 

Peggy was sharp enough to guess all 
this, and to know that Vera would leave 
no stone unturned to blacken her in the 
eyes of her mistress. 

Peggy watched for the postman anxiously 
next morning, but there was nothing for 
her. She felt rather blank, then wondered 
why she didn t feel more grief. She didn t 
realise how short a time she had known 
her husband.. She wondered, too, why the 
face of Jimmy Vane kept rising in her 
mind. The thought of him seemed like a 
sheet anchor in her trouble. 

She bought copies of the two papers 
when she went out for an errand. Jimmy 
had kept his word. Though it must have 
annoyed him to miss sending in an item of 
news, he had not done so. 

But the photo was in the other paper, 
and Peggy hoped no one would bring it to 
the notice of Vera Garland. It was life 
like, especially of Reggie. Anyone who 
knew him could not mistake it. The cap 
tion underneath put her name as Miss 
Margaret Brown. Such an ordinary name 
might belong to anyone, she tried to re 
assure herself. 

All that day she went about her work in 
a sort of dream. Once she pinched herself 
to see if she were really awake. It seemed 
incredible to think she could have been 
married yesterday. And more incredible 
still that she was not brokenhearted at 
the mysterious loss of her husband. 



12 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 . 1 949 



But, somehow, as she looked at the pic 
ture in the newspaper, it seemed to be the 
face of a stranger there. Sho had known 
him BO short a time. A pleasing appear 
ance, a smooth tongue, and her own love 
of romance had led her to this mad act. 
She would have given much to have been 
able to undo it. 

In the afternoon Vera went to the Vicar 
age to tea, Peggy guessed that she 
wanted to make herself liked in the 
neighbourhood, that she looked forward 
to the time when, as mistress of Roselea , 
he would be somebody in the countryside. 

But Peggy put her out of her mind. She 
gave Mr. Garland her tea, then sat down 
to have her own in peace for once. When 



"Well, that wouldn t have mattered. 
Still, come in now." 

He followed her into the cosy kitchen 
and when Peggy saw him in the light of 
the lamp she gave an exclamation. 

"Why, you do look bad, Reggie! What s 
the matter? And whatever happened last 
night? What made you go off like that?" 

"I couldn t help myself." He was warm 
ing his hands by the fire with his back t<> 
her as he spoke, and she could not see his 
face. "If I hadn t hopped off like that 
they d have had me. Those beastly re 
porters . . ." 

"What do you mean? Who would have 
had vou?" 



"Oh, 
course. 



don t be dumb! The police, of 
Even if those fellows didn t know 



mean and crafty. Was it because she 
could see another face in Jww mind, one 
frank and kindly-looking? "So, what are 
you going to do? Why didn t you come 
straight awav here to met What did you 
do?" 

"I was afraid of being seen. I hung 
about in the woods till this evening. I m 
simply starving. Got anything to eatT 
Got .".ny spirits or beer?" 

"No, we re all teetotal here. But I ll 
soon make you some tea." 

The man wolfed some food ravenously, 
and drank the tea in great gulps. At last 
he turned to Peggy again. 

"Can you let me have a bit of money to 
get on with, Peg? I ll go to London; that s 
the best place to lie low in. H,ow much 
have you got?" 

"Oh, Reg, I m afraid I haven t very 
much. I could get some out of the poet 
office, but that ll take. . ." 
"That s no good. I 
want it now at once," 
said Reggie violently. 
"Are you a born fool? 
I suppose the- old womau 
keeps some in the 
house. Go and get 
me some of that." 

"But, Reggie. 1 
I couldn t do a 




"WeU, BOW, I want you to 
tell me all about the affair." 



she was finished she went into the garden 
to throw the crumbs to the birds. 

A sound in the bushes made her start. 
It was almost dark now, and she had 
difficulty in keeping back a scream when a 
man burst out from the bushes. Then, as 
her eyes grew accustomed to the dim light, 
she gave a little gasp. 

The man was Reggie Curzon her hus 
band of a day I 

"Why. Reggie; whatever are you doing 
heret What . . ." 

"Let me in, can t you?" he whispered 
savagely. "I ve been hanging round in 
these bushes for over an hour. I was 
afraid to knock in case you weren t alone." 



me, the picture this morning would have 
done me. I m pretty well known in this 
district. Of all the ghastly luck . . ." 
Peggy looked at him in horrified silence. 
What could he mean. Was he out of his 
mind? 

"Then, to top it all, I had an accident 
after I went. Didn t see the road turn 
the rain and mist were so thick and I 
drove right into a blasted loch. How I 
managed to jump clear I don t know. But 
I did. The car is at the bottom of the 
water and my clothes and money in it." 

"Oh, you poor thing!" Reggie had 
turned round now and Peggy, searching 
his face, wondered why it suddenly looked 



thing like that. It wouldn t be 
honest." 

"Honest, be bio wed. I ve got 
to get away. I ve j^ot to get money some 
how. Do you hear? Just you go and get 
it." 

"Rut. oli, Reggie I I 

"Oh, don t pretend you ve suddenly got 
all pure and good," the man sneered, and 
Peggy shuddered as she saw* his real self 
appear from under its mask. "You knew 
what I was when you married me." 

"Why, what do you mean?" 

"You saw me that night the niglit 1 
gave the old woman what she was asking 
for. When you threw that cursed flash 
light, on me, you saw me right enough. I 
wouldn t have run like I did if I hadn t 
seen your pistol." 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



13 



"Keg Reg " Peggy could hardly 

speak, her mouth and lips were dry, like 
sandpaper. "That man that wasn t you! 
Oh, it couldn t have been you . . ." 

"By gum!" The man s eyea narrowed as 
he looked at the shrinking girl. "By gum. 
you mean to say you didn t see me? And 
I thought you did and . . . Well, if that 
doesn t beat the band." He laughed 
harshly, then went on: "But you said you 
knew me when I asked you, now didn t 
you?" 

"Yes, I did know you. I knew you 
were Reggie Ourzon, who used to live in 
my own town till about tive years ago." 

"You knew me as Why, I thought 

you recognised me as the man who : " 

"As the dirty coward who nearly blinded 
a poor old lady. And you thought I d 
have had a word to say to you if I had. 
That I wouldn t at once have given you 
away to the police. What do you take me 
for? What sort of girl " 

She was interrupted by the door of the 
kitchen being suddenly opened. Vera 
Garland entered, followed by the gardener 
from the Rectory carrying a basket of 
fruit and vegetables for Mrs. Garland. She 
gave a searching glance at the couple. 

For a moment she was dazzled by the 
light. Then a sudden gleam of recognition 
came into her eyes. 

<f Why, you re the burglar! You villain 

you Quick, Harris, catch hold of him 

quick, quick." 

But Reggie was gone. With one bound 
he was out the door, Harris close on his 
heels. Vera ran into the hall to the phone 
and Peggy could hear her calling up the 
police station. Then she returned to the 
kitchen. 

"And now perhaps you ll give me an 



explanation, if you please," she began 
sternly. "Or, rather, I should say, make a 
confession. What were you doing with 
that man what is he to you? You are 
his accomplice, of course. 

"Xo. no indeed, no. I I " 

"Rubbish! I ve always thought you a 
very sly girl. Too meek and sweet to be 
real. Your best policy will be to own up. 
If you don t know that man, what was he 
doing, then, in your kitchen?" 

"I didn t say I didn t know him. But I 
did not know he was the man who broke 
in." Peggy was in deadly fear of giving 
away the fact of her- marriage to this 
woman." He came here a week or two 
ago," she went on jerkily, "said he was 
selling jewellery. I I had this from him." 
Peggy held up her arm with the watch, of 
which she had been so proud, on it. 

"A likely tale," scoffed Vora. "But 
there s the phone." She rushed off and 
a few minutes after announced trium 
phantly that the villain had been caught 
and was now safely under lock and key. 

"Well," she went on, "I must go aud 
tell my aunt all about it. Nice thing to 
happen in a respectable house. It will seem 
a funny thing to me if the police don t 
have you up, too, us an accomplice." 

Poor Peggy had the most miserable night 
of her life. As the slow hours crawled by, 
she wondered what the future held in 
store for her. Tied to a crook a man 
both cruel and ruthless. 

What a fool she d been! With a feeling 
of shame she realised that she hadn t even 
th^ faintest affection for him. It was 
only her love of romance which hud made 
her think she cared for him. 

Romance! Well, she d got all romance 
knocked out of her now, that was certain. 



Yet even as she said these words to herself 
she thought of Jimmy Vane, then wondered 
why. 

Next morning, contrary to her usual 
custom, Vera was down as soon as Peggy. 
She wandered up and down like a beaat of 
prey in the 7,00 waiting to be fed. 

"Go and bring in the paper," she ordered 
as she heard it come through the letter 
box. 

Peggy picked the paper up, then stood 
as if turned to stone. The photo of her- 
eelf and Reggie at Gretna Green had been 
copied, this time much enlarged. And 
underneath it said: 

"Reginald Curx.on, the wanted crook, being 
married at Gi-etna Green. This man, only 
recently released from prison for neftj .y 
blinding an old man, has been eau^iit at 
last. He had repeated hia dastardly trick, 
this time the victim being an old ladv. 
Mrs. Garland." 

It went on to describe the crime, Hieu 
gave an account of the man*s cajrwr as a 
burglar since he left his native place, a 
little town not far from Gr^toa Gret-n. 

"What are you doing with that paper?" 
Vera s strident tones broke in on the girl s 
bewildered dismay. The paper .was almost 
snatched from her. Then Vera saw the 
front page and the photo. 

"I m not surprised," she said, when she 
had taken it in, "not at all surprised. I 
knew you were in league with that man. I 
was sure of it. Well, I should say the 
police will be here any time now for you." 

Even as she said these words, a- loud 
knock at the door made them both jump. 

"Here they are," said Vera with satis 
faction. "Go and open the door." 

[Tarn to page 50.1 



Ah ! that s the way 

scones and pastry 

should taste 



ALWAYS USE 




BAKING POWDER 

Ask for all the Aunt Mary s. Pure Food Products 




14 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



(sly on MO iofilamen; 

ICft manufaeture-J in ENGLAND by 
MPERIAL CrltMlCHl INDUSTRIES 




Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



15 





-FOR EVENING OR SUMMER WEAR- 



Peggy Evans, enchanting young J. 
Arthur Rank actress, who stars in 
Penay and the Pownall Case" a fa*t- 
moving and entertaining second feature 
film from Highbury Studios, rejoices in 
(i wardrobe of ravishing cottons, de 
signed specially for the film by HOT* 
rockses. She i,s seen here displaying one 
</ress of pronounced peasant influence 
--white, ruffly blouse, skin-slim royal 
blue bodice and whirlwind skirt of 
lemon yellow, royal and white, banded 

ivith royal. 

-- *- - , 

The sales manager had been finding it 
difficult to obtain the services of a com 
petent typist for his office. A few days 
after his latest attempt to get a suitable 
girl, he was asked by the works manager: 
"How is your new typist turning out?" 

"Well," waa the reply, "so far, she has 
been making so many slips and bloomers, 
that I think she would be more suitable 
for a job in a garment factory." 



KNITTED AND CROCHET TOYS. 
We have published a booklet which 
will be appreciated by those interested in 
knitted and crochet toys. Full instructions 
and illustrations are given for the follow 
ing: The Duck; A Cuddlesome Pup; Our 
Fluffy Lamb; Christmas Doll Set, compris 
ing Coat, Dress, Boottees, Bonnet, Singlet 
and Pilchers; Eddie, the Elephant; Knitted 
Humpty Dumpty; Mickey Mouse. The 
ideal instruction book for toy-makers and 
Red Cross workers. Send I/- postal note 
for a copy. 



Materials: 5 ozs. 3-ply 
wool; 1 pair of No. 13 
and 1 pair No. 10 needles. 

Measurements: Bust, 32- 
34 inches; sleeve, 5 inches; 
length, 18 inches. 

For 34-36 inches bust: 
length, 19$ inches; sleeve, 
5J inches; use No. 9 
needles and No. 12 for 
rib. 

Tension: 7 sts. and 8 
rows, 1 inch. On No. 9 
needles, 15 sts. and 17 
rows, 2 inches. 

Abbreviations: K., knit: 
p., purl; pat., pattern; m., 
make; si., slip; tog., to 
gether; p.s.s.o., pass slip 
btitch over; rep., repeat; 
sts., stitches; beg., begin 
ning; dec., decrease. 
To Make the Back. 

Using No. 13 needles 
cast on 121 sts. 

Work in p. 1, then k. 1, 
p. 1 rib for 30 rows. 

Change to No. 10 
needles and work pat. as 
follows: 

1st row (wrong side of 
work ) K. 

2nd row P. 

3rd row K. 

4th row K. 1, * m. 1, 
k. 1, si. 1, k. 2 tog., 
p.s.s.o., k. 1, m. 1, k. J, 
rep. from * to end. 

5th row P. 

6th row As 4th. 

7th row P. 

8tli row As 4th. 

These 8 rows form pat 
tern. 

Continue until 10 pats. 
have been worked in all. 
To Extend for Sleeves. 

Cast on 6 sts. at beg. of 
next 8 rows. Continue on 
these 169 sts. for 7 pats, 
and the first 3 rows of the 8th pat. Leave 
sts. on a spare needle. 

To Make the Front. 

Work exactly as for back, but when 2 
pats, and 2 rows of the 3rd pat. have been 
worked on the 36!) sts. divide for neck 
opening thus: k. 0], cast off 47, k. 61. Con 
tinue on each side separately until 8 pats, 
have been worked on the sleeve sts. 

Do not cast off but join shoulders by 
grafting these 61 sts. to the matching 61 
sts. of back, each side. 

Sleeve Edges. 

With No. 13 needles, and right side of 
work facing, k. up 96 sts. along sleeve 
edges. Work 8 rows in k. 1, p. 1 rib. 
Cast off fairly loosely. 

Neck Bibbing. 

Centre front: With No. 13 needles and 




right side of work facing, k. up 49 sts. 
along the cast off, sts. of centre front (47 
cast off sts. aud 1 st. in e.-u-h corner). 
Work in k. 1, p. 1 rib for 1 inch, dec. 1 
st. at beg. of every row. Cast off. 

Work across the remaining 47 sts. of 
centre back in same way. 

Side edges: K. up 43 sts. each side. Work 
8 rows in rib, dec. 1 st. at beg. of every 
row. 8, j w the mitred edges together. 
Bows. 

Take 8 strands of wool, about 1 yard 
long. Twist into a rope, then double over 
lo make a cord. Knot ends. Tie into bows 
:uid aew to each front coriu-r of squan- 
neck. 

Sew up side seams. 

Press lightly under a damp cloth ami 
warm iron. 



After rinsing thoroughly to remove all 
traces of soap, silk dresses may be dipped 
in a warm vinegar solution (1 cupful 
vinegnr to 1 quart water) if you want to" 
restore some of the "sheen" and the "body" 
which it had originally. Silks often be 
come "flimsy after washing and the acid 
rinse helps to restore the finish. 



A Scotsman rushed into hospital bleeding 
from a cut in the check. 

"Done while shaving, 1 suppose?" said 
the doctor. "You want me to stop that for 
you f" 

"I dinna." replied the Scot, indignantly 
"I was juist wpnderin how mu-h ye |uiii 
for blood transfusions!" 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 



MMfffl 




GORStlS & BR/\SSIlRtS 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



17 



Effective Accessories. 

Models at a recent fashion display wore matching shantung 
shoes with afternoon and evening costumes, straw handbags with 
the cotton casuals, and large calf bags for travelling. Hats played 
up cartwheel organdies and tiny flower-trimmed cloches for the 
suits. 

For the finale, a bride and her attendants appeared on the 
runway in full wedding costumes. The bride s dress 
of white organdie had a wide appliqued and embroid 
ered bertha. Bridesmaids dresses were of white 
organdie worn over peach taffeta with taffeta sashes. 

Tulips were, of course, featured flowers in the 
weddings scene and throughout the "tea." 

Odds and Ends. 

Belts will be wider in front than at the back. 
Those not in leather are almost like scarves, but 
are made of materials ranging from raffia and 
string to snakeskin and cork encrusted with 
semi-precious stones. 



fl 




. 
: 



Coat, 
7423 
1s. 6d. 
4| yds. 
36 ins. wide* 

Sizes : 
32 to 40 ins. 



YtevT 



Frock, 7437 1s. 6d. 
4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32-to 40 ins. 



tia 



Efc 



;\i 



-. *M 



fi 



"I 



Frock, 
7220 1s. 6d. 

31 yds. 
36 ins. wide. 

Sizes : 
32 tO 40 ins. 



Frock, 7405 1s. 6d. 
4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32, 34, 36 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 



18 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 



wr? 



Maternity 

Ensemble, 

[7419 2s. 6d 

6 yds. 
36 ins. wide 

Sizes : 
32 to 40 ins 



V 



I 



* 

\ ,/ 



Suit, 7416 1s. 6d. 
3 yds. 36 ins. wide 

Skirt cut on bias. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Pointers. 

Emphasis is still on symmetrical lines expressed in 
uneven hems, saw-edged necklines and in the placing of 
trimmings and fastenings. Square sheer wool scarves 
tucked into belts or pockets heighten this impression, 
while buttons are used in slanting rows to fasten jackets, 
on both backs and fronts of bodices and even on side 
seams. Although matching buttons are in high favour, 
there arc some in natural and smoked mother o pearl 
and others in glass centred with flowers or fishermen s flies. 

New Season Coats. 

Girls spring coats continue to have lots of back 
interest. Yokes are more detailed. Red and green 
arc expected to be among the colours receiving best 
acceptance. 

Newsworthy in little girls 1 dresses is the use of 
wrinkle-proof cotton prints. 




m 



/ f 



-llll 







Frcck, 

7231 1s. 6d. / 

3 1 yds. 1 1 

36 ins. wide. / 

Sizes 32, 34. 36 ms. 



Frock, 7415 1 S . 6d 

3| yds. 36 ins. wide 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal" 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, l?d. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



19 



All New. 

For the young folk this season 
you will see weskit front gabardine 
jumpers with checked gingham 
blouses ; dirndls in cotton, cor 
duroy and velveteen ; soft plaid 
taffeta dresses with bow backs, ruf 
fled oif shoulder, square, or piped 
gathered necklines ; Princess 
button fronts with Irish lace 
collars. They are showing 
some two-piece red corduroy 
suits with silver ball buttons, 
tailored patch pocketed jac 
kets with notched lapel col 
lars. Raspberry and myrtle 
green are featured colours. 

Gown, 13,126 2s. 2d. 

5f yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 




Nightdress, 
10,568 1s. 6d. 
yds. 36 ins. wide 
Sizes 32 to 40 it 




Brassiere and Scanties, 

10,554 1s. 3d. 

1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Scanties cut on bias. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



, 10,576 1 S . 3d. 
yds. 36 ins. wide, 
yds. lace edging. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Pyjamas, 
10,550 1s. 10d. 
t yds. 
e 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney. N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern. \d. extra.] 



20 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 



O 



CRISP COOL 



WHITE 



FOUNDATIONS BY BERLEI 





Beautifully fashioned, "Off-the- 
Shoulder" Bra in exquisite 
white satin at 29/6. Plastic 
honing from waist to ensure 
gentle shaping and support. 
Lovely lines for the young 
slender under decollete even 
ing or bridal gowns. 

White slide-fastening Step-in 
for active wear. Three fittings, 
Prices from 47/- to 62/-. Bras 
siere is longer-line "Hollywood- 
Maxwell" with Broderie Anglais 
bust cups. Two fittingt at 27 / 
and 29/6. 




* Ask for a Personal Fitting 




"Apple Blossom" White Foundations 



GENUINE FREE TRIAL 

and proof that you need not suffer 

Rheumatism 



An English Ite- 
seareh Chemist has 
discovered that Uric 
Acid li;i> nothing 
to do with the pain, 
swelling, and stiff 
ness of Rheumat 
ism 





Mr. Douglas Cur ton s 
Ai?yo/i/t/Ofltf ry dtscovery 
has oixrted the wav to 
one of thf most remark 
able offers ever (mblicly 
made *o Rheumatic suf 
ferers. 



KiiruuiHtir Umnt> ,.;v tu: 
produced ;n the deep vi-irx 
of the Ifirs, and are tfirij 
carried by the Mood to 
every part of tbe body, if- 
sultinsi in (1) arupirlsti cir 
culation ; (21 eorijreslion ; 
and (8) pain ami -welling. 

THE TRUE CAUSEOF RHEUMATISM 

is a toxic condition of the blood originat 
ing in the deep veins of the leg. Thewe 
toxins cause the stiffening of the muscle* 
and the hardening of the joints by he- 
coming 1 localised in certain parts of the 
body and there producing exactly the 
same sort of inflammatory thickening of 
the tissues as results from a boil. 

To remove the cause, whether Muscular Rheu 
matism, Neuritis, Sciatica. Arthritis, or Syno- 
vitis, it is necessary .to (1) relieve the pain; 

(2) eliminate the poisons from the b ood; and 

(3) build up the Nervous System. Mr. Douglas 
Curzon s new development scientifically com 
bines and provides these essentials, and by its 
speedy, safe, and certain action not only defin 
itely assists in banishing the pain, swelling, and 
stiffness, but builds resistance against future 
attacks. 

FREE TREATMENT 

Send the form at the foot of this announcement 
and receive: 

(1) A supply of Analgesic Tablets to give in 
stant relief in every case of Muscular Nervn 
or Arthritic Rheumatism. These tablets 
are guaranteed to be absolutely harmless, 
relieving Rheumatic Pains wherever situ 
ated. 

(2) A supply of Rheumatoxin Elimlnant. This 
scientific combination tones up the fiver, 
stomach, and digestive organs. By its 
direct action on the blood it quickly and 
safely reduces swelling and stiffness. 



"Your treatment has done my husband a 
wonderful lot of <*ood. He can walk five 
miles now; and, before taking your treat 
ment, he couldn t walk one mile; so I can 
highly recommend your treatment for 
Rheumatism." E.H.B.. Wilson, S.A. 
"I am very pleased to be able to say that I 
am free from pain after 12 months suffering 
with muscular Rheumatism in the neck." 
A.E.D., Orroroo, S.A. 



APPLICATION FORM 

The Controller. 

Anglo-Australian Laboratories, 
26 Hunter St. (Box 4242XX), Svdney. 

Please send me the supply of Analgesic 
Tablets and Rheumatoxin EHminartt 
promised free of charge and obligation. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

(Print in Block Letters and enclose 2jd. 
stamp for return.) AHJ9/49 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



21 




A^Frock, 9009 1s. 6d. 16 to 18 years. 32 ins. 
bust. 3 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

B Frock, 9076 1s. 3d. 10 and 12 years. 2 yds. 
36 ins. wide. Contrast : yd. 36 ins. wide. 

C Frock, 9075 1s. 3d. 12 and U years. 3| 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 

D Frock, 9036 1s. 3d. 12 and U years. 3| 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 

E Frock, 9021 1s. 3d. 10 and 12 years. 2| 
yds. 36, ins. wide. 

supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Austrian fame Journal \ 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. - Postage on each Pattern, \\d. extra.] 



/Australian riome journal, oeptemDer T 



DRESSMAKING 




MADE EASY 

Learn Dresscutting - Designing 
and Dressmaking . . . 

Be competent to cut and make perfect fitting 
clothes for every figure. Save money and know 
the joy of wearing perfect fitting garmenta. 

PERSONAL AND POSTAL 
LESSONS BY EXPERTS 

Our chool are known everywhere for our uc- 
ccasful graduate*, and our methods endorsed by 
leading Fashion houses throughout the British 
Empire. Be sure of the best tuition. 

LESSONS ARE SIMPLE AND 
INEXPENSIVE 



I MAIL COUPON TO NEAREST BRANCH 



McCabe Academy 



Kindly mail me, without obligation, your Free J 
I Booklet about Dressmaking, for which I enclose | 

2 id. stamp. 

I Name | 

Address 

I Are you interested in Postal Lessoin? I 



McCABE ACADEMY of DRESSMAKING 

THE FOREMOST AND LARGEST SCHOOL OF FASHION. 
Sydney: Canberra House, 295 Elizabeth St.. Box 2424. 

Melbourne: Manchester Unity Bldgs., Swanston and Collins Sts.. Box 330C. 
Brisbane: Penny s Buildings, Adelaide St. Entrance, Box I8I6W. G.P.O. 
Perth: National House, William St.. Box 482. 
Adelaide: Shell House, North Terrace, Box 5I9E. 
South Africa: Shakespeare House, Commission St., Johannesburg, P.O. Box 5811. 







Zealattd 



From the crystal-clear streams of New Zealand come WHITEBAIT tiny 
inch-long fish, the most delicately flavoured in the world. ST. GEORGE 
retains the fj!i freshness and unique flavour of Whitebait by quick 
canning and provides you with a special treat for every occasion. Serve 
St. George Whitebait to your guests and your family it s delightful. 




At all leading 
Australian Stores 

ST. GEORGE 

WHITEBAIT 




Dunedin 



IRVINE STEVENSON S ST. GEORGE CO LTD 







New Zealand 



As showing what can happen these days, 
a woman in a London hospital was oper 
ated on twice in the one day, once by a 
mistake. She accepted 350 agreed dam 
ages against a surgeon, a London hospital 
aind an anaesthetist. She was confused 
with another patient and operated on again 
before the error was discovered. 



Each of the partners in a truly happy 
marriage is responsible for the combined 
peace and comfort of them both. 

When children come, they, in turn, be 
come responsible for everything that re 
flects on the well-being of the family unit 
as a whole. It is the love of parents for 
their children which fostera this. 




Lasting Beauty 

for Lovely Hair 

For children and adults there is 
nothing more beneficial to the 
hair than regular core with 
Barry s Tri-coph-etous. This treat 
ment helps prevent falling hair, 
dandruff, premature gteyness, 
brittle hair and itching scalp. 

BARRY S " 

Tri-coph-erous 

FAMOUS HAIR TONIC 
by all Cftem/sfs & Stores 



Women Often 
Need This Help 

Tiredness, depression and that 
nervy feeling often cause un 
necessary -suffering to busy 
women. When you feel that 
nothing is going right, when 
you re nervy, irritable and have 
that horrible depressed fueling, 
start taking WINCARNIS, th. 
wonderful recuperative tonic 
which picks you up so quickly. 
WINCARNIS is rich in basic 
elements to fortify your nerves 
and generally tone up your 
system, making you feel "on 
top of the world" again in no 
time. i 

Thousands of recommendations 
from the medical profession 
tesify to the valuable health- 
giving qualities of WINCARNIS. 
Start a course of this sreat 
tonic right away and feel it 
doing you good . . . Ask your 
Chemist for WINCARNIS . . . 
the Wine of L,ife. 




"CHICO" INVISIBLE 
EARPHONES. 2I/- Pr. 

Worn inside your ears, no cords or bat 
teries. Guaranteed for your Lifetime. 
"Chico" Earphones have enjoyed an un 
interrupted sale on the Australian market 
for over 20 years. Write for Free Booklet. 
HEARS EARPHONE CO., No. 30 State 
Shopping Block, Market Street, Sydney. 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



23 



Frock, 9074 1s. 3d. 

10 and 12 years. 
3* yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Frock, 9105 1s. 6d. 

16 to 18 years. 

32 inches bust. 

5 yds. 36 ins. wide. 





Frock, 9008 1s. 3d. 

12 and 14 years. 
2 1 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Skirt cut on bias. 



Suit 9079 1s. 3d. 

tO, 12, 14 years. 
3| yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Skirt cut on bias. 



Apart from changes in clothing fashions, 
the woman who wishes to keep an up-to-the- 
minute appearance in Paris just now has 
many other things to think about. 

Coinciding with a "swish" show the other 
week came new fashions in feminine acces 
sories ranging from handbags and shoes to 
belts and parasols. 

The changes are slight this year, but cou 
turiers have as usual devoted their skill to inventing 
something that will lend a note of individuality to 
every woman s ensemble. 
Children s Choice. 

Children who have their own preferences in 
colour should be allowed to make the colour 
selection for psychological reasons. Other 
factors in the choice of colour are attrac 
tiveness, suitability to child s age, size and 
personality and fastness of colour to wash 
ings and sunlight. Vat dyed cottons should 
be selected. 

[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-400 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 




24 



Australian Home Journal, September 1. 1949 



Safari Jacket 
9104 1s. 10d. 
yds. 36ins. wide. 
Sizes 34 to 44 chest. 





Men s Shorts, 
380 1s. 3d. 
s|Sizes 32 to 42 waist. 

If yds. 

36 ins. wide. 

Lining, | yd, 

36 ins. wide. 

Also sizes 
6 to 14 years. 



Sun Suit, 
9089 1 S . 3d 
1 yd. 36 ins. wide 
Lining, | yd. 
36 ins. wide. 



Handbags and Gloves. 

Handbags are completely feminine 
and mostly in suede. They are smaller 
but likely to be especially popular are 
those with petal-shaped tiered skirts. 

The box-shaped variety, however, still 
remains popular. 

Many of the latest handbags are made 
in two parts, one reserved for lipstick, 
powder and so on, an^ the rest as the Sizes 2, 4, 6 years 
handbag proper. It is regarded here in 
Paris as the first step to making women 
moderately tidy. 

Shoes are spiky-heeled. Indeed, they look quite 
dangerous. Carpet slippers are practically without 
heels. 

Gloves arc being made so short that they hardly 
reach the wrist-bone. They have tiny cuffs or are 
gathered drawstring fashion. For evening wear, 
they are so long that they nearly reach the shoulder. 
The latter variety are in either Jersey or in black 
leather. 

Fashion leaders also decree that parasols shaJl 
be of frilly white pique. 




Suit, 9082, 1 S . 3d. 

1 to 2 years. . ^ _ 
Shirt, 1 yd. 36 ins. wide. V A 
Pants, | yd. 36 ins. wide^- : 



Suit, 9035 1s. 
2 and 4 years 
Jacket, 1 yd. 36 ins 
_ Pants, | yd. 36 ins 

[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.] 



3d. 

. wide, 
wide. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



25 




iiimi-iiM 

BEBARFALD-VICKERS 
BUREAU SEWING MACHINES 



A truly magnificent 
machine. The Enplish Viokers Head 
sews both backwards" and forwards. 
Other special features include Auto 
matic Bobbin Winder. Stitch Adjuster 
and Tension Control. Handsome 
Bureau Cabinet, as illustrated, in light 
Maple colour. 

- CUT AND MAIL THIS COUPON - 
BEBARFALU* LTD.. 
Cnr. Gforgr * Park St.,.. SYD\EY 
Please /onrard fall details of the "Bebaitald- 
Vicken" Bureau Sewing Machine, tilth details 
of your Specialised tat) Terns. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



A.H.J. 99. 



BEBARFALDS 

OPPOSITE SYDNEY TOWN HALL 



"Iron Starvation" is 
often the cause of lack 
of energy, anaemia and 
that run-down feeling. 
Iron "Jelloids" provide, 
in in easy-to-take form, 
the iron needed to build 
np rich, red blood. 



Iron 



to Boys & Girls 




Wrtot Watch*.. Cumtras, M t -Ma Dolli. 
fountain Pens. Many other Valuable Prizes for 
selling iman parcels v ttsted garden seedi. Send 
for parcel and bif catalogue of presents. Send no 
monrynow.on/xfiafne* Jar/dress. W. iff fo-da/. 
lohn B. Murray, Ml K <iorga St., Sydney 

If brushes, mops and brooms are to be 
efficient in cleaning, they have to be kept 
clean themselves. Wash brittle brushes in 
lukewarm water, with one tablespoonful 
of ammonia added to each quart of water. 
After scouring well, hang out to dry. 




out of 




Dentists recommend 



I PAN A 




t 



TOOTH PASTE 




According to an Australian wide survey 

conducted by an independent Research Organisation 

more than 8 out of 10 Dentists recommend IPANA 

in preference to any other Tooth Paste. 



26 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 




The Great Gatsby" Prince Edward 



nice, lovable fam 
ily circle, each of 
the Little Women 
having a different 
personality, such 
as you will find in 
many families to 
day the torn-boy, 
the soft-hearted 
one, the beauty of 
the family, the 
severely practical 
one. The many 
thousands who 
have read the 
book it was 
issued in . 1868 
will enjoy again 
making the ac 
quaintance of 
Meg, Jo, Beth, and 
Amy-all intensely 
human and con 
vincing. In the 
cast : Peter Law- 
ford, Margaret 



The Play and Film 



Humphrey Bogart, ex-Army 
major, arrives in the midst of 
the summer heat at a Key Largo, 
Florida hotel which is run by 
Lionel Barrymore and his war- 
widowed daughter - in - law, 
Lauren Bacall. Upstairs, a mob 
ster, played by Edward G. Rob- 
inson, is hiding out with his 
men, waiting for nightfall and 
a visit from another mob from 
Miami. A hurricane strikes and 
forces the gang to remain longer 
than anticipated. Tension 
mounts, and the air is filled with 
menace, as the law pays a visit 
and regards the strange 
assembly suspiciously. Kobinson 
threatens the entire gathering, but Bogart 
intervenes. Gun-play follows, and the ex- 
Army major eliminates the mobsters. 
Dramatic, thrilling and tensive. Others in 
the cast: Claire Trevor, Thomas Gomez, 
Harry Lewis, John Rodney, Marc Law 
rence, Dan Seymour, Monte Blue (Regent). 
* * * 

Ingrid Bergman has completed in real 
life the journey she enacted on Hollywood 
sets as the Maid of Orleans, in her new 
picture, "Joan of Arc," at the Century. 
During the pilgrimage, which covered the 
route taken by the real Joan from the time 
she left her native Domremy in Lorraine 
until ehe was burned at the stake in Rouen, 
Miss Bergman visited the historic buildings 
and locations which are associated witffthe 
name of the famous Saint. While in 
Rheims she visited the Cathedral in which 
Joan had the Dauphin of France crowned 
King, and lunched with his excellency, 
Marmottin, Archbishop of Rheims. Her 
trip ended at Orleans, where an official re 
ception was held in her honour. The cast 
is a long one, dating from the time when 
the sixteen-year-old peasant girl in the 
little village of Domremy hears angel voices 
that tell her she is destined to drive the 
enemy from her country. One writer calls 
it a play of intrigue and simple faith, and 
simple faith wins. 

* 

Liberty is showing "Little Women," per 
haps one of the best stories by that prolific 
writer, the late Louisa May Alcott. A 




"Key Largo" Regent. 
O Brien, Elizabeth Taylor, 
Janet Leigh, Mary Astor, 
Lucile Wilson, Sir C. 
Aubrey Smith, Elizabeth 
Patterson, and Leon Anies. 

* * * 

The cast of M-G-M s 
Technicolour film, "Little 
Women," had a wedding- 
cake recently and, while 
the wedding was a part of 
the production, the cake 
had nothing to do with it. 
The scene depicted the mar 
riage of Janet Leigh, as 
Meg, to Richard Stapley, 
as Brooke. After the final 
words of the ceremony the 
sequence ended, without 
showing the reception. 
After the "take" the cast 
was called to Janet s dressing-room, where 
a cake awaited them. The accompaning 
note read: "What s a wedding without a 
cake?" It was a surprise gift to Mervyn 
LeRoy and his cast from Janet Leigh s 
mother and home-made! 

* * * 

"The Barklays of Broadway," starring 
Ginger -Rogers and Fred Astaire, at St. 
James Theatre, definitely marks an era in 
theatrical enterprises. It was understood 
the dancing pair would never be together 
again. Ginger developed a flair for prob 
lem plays. Fred established his own 
schools of dancing all over America, and 
announced he was finished with film and 



theatrical appearances. And now it is all 
altered. One enthusiastic American critic 
puts it this way: "Fred s dancing with 
Ginger, and Broadway s dancing with joy." 
The reunion of these two caused the 
, staid New York "Times" to say: "one of 
the most felicitous combinations the screen 
has ever known." They are a joyous treat 
to watch, and in "The Barklays of Broad 
way" they excel themselves. 
* 

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers are pre 
paring to drive on the seventh hole at the 
Bel Air Country Club, California. Set off 
to one side are a Technicolor camera and 
a battery of reflectors, because their golfing 
is for a scene in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer s 
"The Barklays of Broadway." Just before 
Ginger steps up to her tee Astaire says 
suddenly: "Say, Ginger, do you remember 
this spot! Two years ago?" His partner 
thinks a moment, then her face lights up 
as she recalls. "Yes. You and your wife 
and Jack (Jack Briggs, Ginger s husband) 
and I were right here when we decided we 
should make another picture together." 
"That s right," added Astaire. 
"As soon as we finished the 
round we called Irving Berlin 
and had a conference about it. 
But we couldn t find a story. 
And now here we are, doing a 
picture together right in the 
same place." Director Charles 
Walters halts the reminiscing 
by starting the scene. Ginger 
swings and hits a bad slice into 
the rough at the right. Where 
upon Astaire steps up to her 
and remarks: "You re slicing 

better to-day, though!" 

* * * 

"The Great Gatsby" (Prince 
Edward) is the story of a man 
who started from small begin 
nings and at the absurdly early 
age of thirty had made a for 
tune. His experience, unfor- 




"Tarzan s Magic Fountain," Civic. 
tunately, had taught him that money can 
buy anything, and with this thwarted idea 
of human relations he puts his belief to 
the test. He throws lavish parties, but 
finds the right folk dq not come along. 
Earlier in his career he had met a beauti 
ful spoiled young socialite and they fell 
madly in love. She wanted to marry him 
at once, but as it was wartime he deferred 
the wedding. On his return he learned that 
she, in his absence, had married a rich foot 
ball hero, so he sets out to get enough money 
to win her back. Later, with the assist 
ance of a mutual friend, a meeting. between 
him and his former sweetheart is arranged. 
She tells him she still loves him and she 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



27 



knows her husband is playing around. 
Dramatic events follow, fights, motor acci 
dents, and the versatile and ambitious 
Gatsby is shot through the back! In the 
cast: Alan Ladd, Betty Field, Macdonald 
Carey, Buth Hussey, Barry Sullivan, 
Howard da Silva, Shelley Winters, Henry 

Hull. 

* * 

Veronica Lake is making certain that 
the hair-over-one-eye coiffure which 
ushered in her film career can t happen 
again. The actress had 20th Century-Fox s 
hair stylist, Irene Brocks, snip her blonde 
tresses into an extremely short action bob, 
with not a single strand left long enough 
to dangle below brow level. As Miss Lake 
gees it, the over-the-eye coiffure, used in 
"I Wanted Wings," served its purpose in 
getting her launched on a screen career, 
but is permanently in discard as far as her 
future roles are concerned. 

* 

Loretta Young has to perform with ex- 
wrestler and screen tough guy, Mike 
Mazurki, in her next picture. She 
found Mike s neck was the same size 
as her waist 21 inches. 

* * * 
Barbara Stanwyck re-issues her 

legs for the first time before the 
camera in five years in "The Lady 
Gambles." That s no gamble; it s a 
cert eye-view. 

* * * 
Adventure and peril in the African 

jungle provide action in "Tarzan s 
Magic Fountain," at the Civic, star 
ing Lex Barker in the role of the 
famous ape man, with Brenda Joyce, 
as his mate, sharing stellar honours. 
A remarkable spring possesses re 
juvenating qualities enjoyed by 
natives. An English woman flyer 
whose plane cracked up in the valley 
many years before has retained her 
youth by drinking the waters. No 
one else, except Tarzan, knows of 
the secret until the aviatrix decides 
to return to England. Immediately a . 
band of crooked traders set out to 
make a fortune from the magic 
water. Tarzan s efforts to stop them 
lead to a thrilling climax in which the en 
raged natives attack the traders with 



deadly flaming 
arrows, and the 
ape man braves 
the danger to res 
cue Jane from the 
massacre. Barker 
makes his debut 
as the famed 
Edgar Bice Bur 
roughs jungle hero. 
Albert Dekker, 
Evelyn Ankers, 
Charles Drake and 
Alan Napier give 
the other princi 
pal portrayals. 
* 

Ivor Novello s 
musical play, "The 
Dancing Years," 
which has taken 
over a million 
pounds at theatres, 
is to be filmed at 





"Joan of Arc" Century. 
last. It will be made in colour at Elstree. 



The Barfdtrys of Broadway" St. James. 

worn by the actress with her volu 
minous hoop-skirts. 

* * 

Charlie Chaplin has now decided 
that his next picture will be a silent 
one. It will be a circus story in 
which Charlie Chaplin plays a clown. 
He s going back to pantomime which 
made millions of dollars for him in 
the silent picture days. The story, ] 
understand, is more or less a rehash 
of Chaplin s life. 

* * 

Esther Williams has opened her 
own petrol station at Santa Monica. 
She insists that all the attendants 
wear evening dress; checks up her 
self on sales in an old pair of dun 
garees. 

* * * 

Stewart Granger has been asked 
for hia photograph by Mrs. Eleanor 
Gallagher, of the Molescroft Inn. 
Beverley, Yorkshire. She was his 
landlady when he had his first pro 
fessional engagement with the Hull 
Eepertory Company at 3 a week. 




Little Women," Liberty, 



The marriage is an 
nounced of Jennifer 
Jones to David O. Selz- 
nick pn board a yacht 
off the coast of Italy. 
Jennifer was the star 
of the film, "Song of 

Bernadette." 

* * * 

There was never a dull 
moment on the set of 
M-G-M s film, "Little 
Women." In the midst 
of an important scene 
Mary Astor, who por 
trays the role of Mar- 
mee, broke a bone. A 
trouper to her fingertips, 
the actress continued 
with the scene until it was 
safely recorded on film. 
Only then did she clutch 
her side and return to 
her dressing-room, close 
the door and call for aid. 
A wardrobe girl and 
pliers effected a speedy 
cure. The bone was one 
one the mainstays of the 
waist - binding corset 



{Tarn to page 




Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire, St. James. 



28 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 





WHY 

ASPRO 

NASA 

SPECIAL 

APPEAL 

FOR 

WOMEN 



The modern woman, living as she does an "almost 
non-stop existence, demands TRUE relief whenever 
pain comes. She must have a pain reliever which 
not only acts quickly but does not have after-effects 
which prevent her from going about things as usual 
after - effects such as dizziness, depression or 
"slowing-up"; or sometimes harm to the system. 

That ii why Aspro hat a special appeal for women, not only 
in Australia, but all over the world. Aspro , free from . harmful 
drugs leaves you fresh and fir again after the pain has gone. 



THE PURITY OF ASPRO 

The purity of Aspro conforms to the 
standard laid down by the British 
Pharmacopoeia a guiding authority 
of the Medical Profession. 



ASPRO 

NO DEPRESSING AFTER-EFFECTS 

NO "SLOWING-UP" 

NO HAZINESS 

NO HARM TO HEART OR STOMACH 

THE SAFE WAY TO RELIEVE 

HEADACHE&PAIN 




COPYRIGHT 




750 FREE BOOKS oh 

DANCING! 

For a limited time Profeor Bolot, Aus 
tralia s leading Ballroom Dancing Instruc 
tor and Authority, is offering absolutely 
FREE to all readers of "Australian Home 
Journal" a copy of his brand-new book, 
"DANCING AS A FINE ART." This 
book will show you how to learn dancing 
at home in the privacy of your own 
room, without music or partner. Dancing 
is the short-cut to good times non- 
dancers and bad dancers miss all the fun 
in life. Now is the time to start learning. 

Post the Coupon for your Fr* Book. 
TEAR COUPON POST NOW 



PROFESSOR J. BOLOT, F-AJL. 

French Dancing Academy, 
Studio 44, Oxford Street, Sydney. 
Dear Sir. Please send me by return 
mail a copy of your FREE book, 
"Dancing As a Fine Art." 1 encloso 
2 id. stamp. 



Name. 



Address. 



Sept. 49 



STOP YOUR 

Rupture 

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Try the new Roussel Appliance 

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work or indulge in your favourite 

sport with comfort and security. 

Definitely holds, a condition 

absolutely necessary for im 

provement or recovery. Recom 

mended by Doctors and thou 

sands of men and women users 

throughout Australia. Many say 

it has done away entirely with 

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Mr. R. O. W. Uneharn, of Farm 

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fitted by post, says : " The belt I purchased from 

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ADDRESS : THE ROUSSEL APPUAflGB O., 
DEFT. 39, 9 MARTIN PLACE, SYDNEY. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



29 



JASMINE CROCHET SET 



Uere illustrated is a very lovely set for 
baby, worked in a soft, open crochet pat- 
torn. The coat shows a very full skirt, 
giving plenty of warmth. 

Materials: 5 balls Lady Betty wool; 1 
yard wide satin ribbon; ]} yards ^-inch 
ribbon, and 1 yard bebe ribbon; bone cro 
chet hook, coarse for the skirt of coat, and 
medium for yoke, bonnet and bootees. 

Measurements: Length of coat from 
shoulder, 19 inches; width at underarm, 21 
inches; sleeve, 6 inches; bonnet and 
bootees to match. 

Abbreviations: Ch., chain; s.s., slip- 
stitch; d.c., double crochet; tr., treble; d.t., 
double treble (made by putting wool over 
hook twice) ; h.t., half treble (made by 
putting wool over once, hook through work 
and draw through 1 loop, wool over and 
draw through all the loops. 
The Coat. 

Using the fine needles make 55 ch., turn 
and make 1 H.H. into 2nd ch. from hook, 1 
s.s. into each eh. to end. 

Bow 2 1 g.s. into each st., working into 
hack of loop of B.S. of previous row. 

Row 3 Repeat row 2. 



Bow 4 * 7 ch., miss 1 st., 1 d.c. into 
next st. Repeat from * to end of row, 
turn with 4 ch. 

Bow 5 * 1 s.s. into centre of 7 ch., 1 ch. 
Repeat from *. 

Repeat the last four rows until five rows 
of zig-zag pattern insertion are complete, 
then work 7 ch. groups for shoulder, turn 
and continue on these shoulder sts. until 
you have four rows of insertion; extend 
across front of neck by making 14 ch. and 
continue in pattern on these sts. and 
shoulder sta. until three rows of insertion 
are worked. Break off wool. 

Join again at neck and work other 
shoulder and front to match. When this 
is complete work two rows of the insertion 
(8 rows) straight across fronts and back, 
joining the underarm whilst doing so. 

Make a row of ribbon holes across waist 
by working * 1 tr. into each of next 2 sts., 
miss 1 st. Repeat from *, ending row with 
2 tr. 

Change to other needle and work the 
pattern for skirt as follows: 

Foundation row * 5 ch., miss 2 sta., 1 
s.s. into next st. Repeat from * to end. 



Bow 2* 5 ch., 2 d.t. into 1st loop, 5 ch., 
1 d.c. into centre of next loop. Repeat 
from * to end, turn. 

Bow 3 * 5 ch., 1 d.c. into 5 ch. of d.t. 
group, 5 ch., 1 d.c. into 5 ch. loop of pre 
vious row. Repeat from *, turn. 

Bow 4 * 5 ch., 2 d.t. into loop on top of 
tr., 5 ch., 1 d.c. into centre of next 5 ch. 
loop. Repeat from *. 

Repeat rows 3 and 4 until coat is 18j 
inches from commencement. 

As the pattern has a tendency to slant 
to one side it is easily adjusted by light 
pressing; then work an edging round coat 
as follows: Along lower edge * 1 d.c. into 
d.c., 3 tr., 3 ch., 3 tr. into loop. Repeat 
from *. 

Along each front edge work af follows, 
taking care to work firmly to keep edge 
straight: * 3 ch., 2 tr. into same st., miss 
4 sts., 1 d.c. into next st. Repeat from *. 
Work a beading round neck to match bead 
ing at waist. 

Sleeve. 

Join wool at underarm, using the fine 
needle, and work the foundation row, 
spacing so as to make 10 loops in all round 
armhole. Work rows 3 and 4 of skirt pat 
tern until there are seven rows of treble 
groups. Join underarms of sleeve neatly. 
[Turn to page 31 .] 









30 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 




Always use 

FISHERS 

Polishing WAX 

FOR FLOORS, LINOS & FURNITURE 

For dark woods ask for FISHER S DARK STAIN IWAXTANE) 

f 4 




Ashton & Parsons Infants Powders are wonder- 
OUT f u M v soothing at teething times. They ensure 
regular, easy motions, cool the blood and are 
Mother tO absolutely safe. Try . them next time baby is 

. fretful through teething. 

give you BOX of 20 Powder*, 1/6 

ASHTON & PARSONS 
INFANTS POWDERS" 



Hostess (gushingly ) : "You know, I ve 
heard a great deal about you." 

Prominent Politician (absently) : "Pos 
sibly, but you can t prove anything." 



Out in California they are now filming 
the "Ten Commandments." This ought to be 
a mighty good thing for Hollywood, in 
more ways than one. 




long and colourful IHc 







COLD 

RELY ON HALF MEASURES 
TAKE FOOLISH CHANCES 



Get after your chest co i w th moist h<>at a 
time-proven treatment endorsed by many doctors 
all over the world. Antiphlogistine Poultice C VPS 
you the benefits of moist heat right tn vour 
own home. Just do these two simple things 
recommended by many doctors: 

1. Put an Antiphlogistine Pou tice on back and 
chest. Throat, too if it s sore. 

2. Go to bed. Antiphlogistine Poultice works all 
through the night. Helps you get a good night s 
sleep. 




The soothing warmth 01 
Antiphlogistine Poultice relaxes 
tense or achine muscles, stimulates 
circulation, helps ease coughs due 
to colds. 



DRINK HABIT 
DESTROYED 

Do you suffer through the curse of 
excessive drinking? EUCRASY has 
changed homes from misery and 
want to happiness again. Esiablished 
52 years it destroys all desire for 
Alcohol. Harmless, tasteless, can be 
given secretly or taken voluntarily. 
State which required. 

SEND 20/- FULL TWENTY 

DAYS COURSE. 
DEPT. B, EUCRASY CO. 

297 Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



It is estimated that each child born is 
burdened with eleven pounds of National 
debt. That explains why babies cry so 
much. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



31 



JASMINE CROCHET SET 

[From page 29.] 
Cuff. 

Work 2 d.c. into each loop all round and 
2 d.c. into each treble group. Now work 
the four rows of zig-zag insertion pattern, 
then one row of s.s., finishing with a shell 
edging thus: * 3 ch., 2 tr. into same at., 
miss 2 sts., 1 d.c. into next st. Eepeat 
from * all round. Work other sleeve the 
same. 

Bonnet. 

Using the fine needle make C ch., join 
with a s.s. into the ring. Work (1 d.c., 
. ! tr., 1 d.c.) five times. 

Bound 2 S. to centre of back of 1st 
petal, * 4 ch., 1 s.s. into centre of back of 
next petal. Kepeat from * all round. 

Bound 3 1 d.c., 6 tr., 1 d.c. into each 
loop all round. 

Bound 4* 6 ch., 1 d.c. into next petal. 
Repeat from * all round. 

Bound 5 8 d.e. over each loop (40 d.c.). 

Bound 6 * 1 d.c. into each of 4 d.c., 2 
d.o. into next d.c. Eepeat from * all round. 

Bound 7 * 7 ch., miss 1 st., 1 s.s. into 
next st. Eepeat from * all round. 

Bound 8 1 s.s. into 4th of each 7 ch., 
with 1 ch. between all round. 

Bound 9 1 s.s. into each of 5 s.s. (work 
ing into back of st.), 2 s.s. into next st. 
Repeat from * all round. 

Bound 10 Bepeat round 7. 

Bound 11 1 s.s. into 4, st. of 7 ch., with 
2 ch. between all round. 




Bound 12 1 d.c. into each st. all round. 

Bound 13 1 d.c. into each st. until you 
have 65 d.c., turn, and work pattern thus: 

Foundation row * 5 ch., miss 4 d.c., 1 
s.s. into next st. Eepeat from * to end of 
row. 

Now work the two pattern rows to match 
coat five times. 

Front Border. 

Work 3 d.c. into each loop of previous 
row. 

Bow 2 Work the 7 ch. row of zig-zag 
pattern, then the following row of same; 
then work a row of shell pattern to match 
cuff, and two. rows of d.c. across back of 
bonnet, pulling into a straight line whilst 
working the d.e. 

Bootee. 

Make 38 ch. with the fine needle, turn, 
and work 1 d.c. into 2nd ch. from hook and 
1 d.c. into each st. to end. Now work the 
four rows of zig-zag pattern, then one row 
of d.c. Now make the foundation row as 
for bonnet, working seven loops across. 
Work the two pattern rows five times for a 
long bootee or four times for a shorter oiu>. 
In the next row work 36 d.c. 

Bibbon holes 1 h.t. into first st., * miss 
1 d.c., 1 ch., 1 h.t. into next st. 



Eepeat from * to end of row. There will 
be 18 spaces. 

Instep. 

Join wool at -7th h.t. (that is, leave six 
spaces). Work row 4 of zig-zag pattern 
across, leaving six spaces unworked at 
other side, turn and work until you have 
completed two rows of insertion, finishing 
with a row of d.c. Break off wool. Join 
again at beginning of row and work 1 d.c. 
into next st., 2 d.c. into each space, 11 d.c. 
down side of instep flap, 12 sts. across toe, 
11 down other side, and 13 along the ankle. 
(60 d.c.). 




Work rows 4, 5 and 2 of the zig-zag pat 
tern, then two rows of d.e. Shape as 
follows: 

Bow 1 24 d.c. over 24 d.c., miss next 
d.c., 10 d.c. over 10 d.c., miss next d.c., 24 
d.c. 

Bow 2 24 d.c. over 24 d.c., miss next 
d.c., 8 d.c., miss next d.c., 24 d.c. 

Bow 3 24 d.c. over 24 d.c., miss next 
d.c., 6 d.c., miss next d.c., 24 d.c. 

Work two more rows, decreasing 1 st. 
each end of row and at the same place at 
toe. Break off wool. Make another the 
same. 

To Finish. 

Sew up the seam of bootee. Embroider 
tiny roses on bootees, yoke and front of 
bonnet. Make two flowers as crown of 
bonnet (one row of petals only), and thread 
bebe ribbon through the zig-zag sts. of 
bonnet across front. Sew a flower each 
side of bonnet, making a small satin centre 
whilst attaching streamers. Thread bebe 
ribbon through slots of bootee, also at neck 
and waist of coat. 



Bread Hints. 

To Make Good Yeast: Put 1 teaspoonful 
hops into a 2-pint saucepan and three-parts 
fill with hot water. Boil for a few minutes, 
then strain and add 3 tablespoonsful of 
sugar. When cool, add 3 tablespoonsful of 
plain flour, and bottle. Leave till worked 
for 6 or 8 hours less if in a hurry for 
your bread. 

To Make the Bread Sponge: Sieve 4 
or 5 sievesful of flour into a basin. Take 
out 3 or 4 big handsful and put into a smaller 
bowl. If cold weather, warm the flour in 
the small bowl and then make a hole in 
the centre of flour and pour in the bottle of 
yeast. Have ready a jug of warm water, 
with potato water added. Strain water 
from potatoes one has for dinner; it does 
nicely. Add enough of the warm water 
with the yeast to make it soft and spongy 
when mixing flour and yeast together for 
the bread sponge. Sprinkle top with a 
little flour, cover up and keep warm until 
it works well; i.e., make yeast at 2 



o clock in the afternoon. Make sponge at 
8 at night and in the morning warm the 
flour in the bigger dish. 

The Bread: After warming the flour, 
make a hole in the centre, same as for thu 
sponge. Have ready about 2 pints of warm 
water, with a handful of salt added. 

Put sponge into the flour, then water, 
and mix up gradually until it does not 
stick to the hands, take $ hour or more 
to knead it well. Leave to rise well, 
almost ready to run over the dish; cut off 
required sizes and knead up for bread 
loaves. Put into greased tins or baking 
dishes. Leave to rise well once more. 

Have ready a good, hot, steady oven. 
Place in. the bread, which should be risen 
nicely, but not over-risen, or it will fall 
over the tins in the oven. Leave in oven 
for 1 hour, and turn right round, bringing 
the back loaves to the front and front 
loaves to the back. Leave for another 20 
minutes or $ hour, when bread should be 
baked through. 

I have always made my bread this way 
and always have good bread. If you are a 
beginner always get a wee drop of yeast 
from a baker or neighbour to put with 
yours. It starts the bottle quicker for you, 
otherwise you will be a week getting your 
first bottle of yeast to work properly. Never 
let your bread get cold, for it will not rise. 
(Signed) "A Woman of the West." 



Grimy Hands. 

When the hands have become grimy 
through some household, gardening, or 
motor-car service, take a generous amount 
of cold cream, cleansing cream, or bath 
oil and work it into the skin before wash 
ing the hands in warm water with a good 
neutral soap. You will find after drying 
them that the skin is soft and never dry, 
drawn, and taut, as it so frequently is after 
exposure to dirt, grease and grime and the 
use of household soaps. 

Lemon juice or hand lotion will take 
away that shrivelled appearance of the 
skin that comes from long immersion in 
water. So, remember, immediately after 
washing the -hands, no matter^ how many 
times a day and especially during the 
winter months, to be sure to massage them 
well with hand lotion. Most hand lotions 
are quickly absorbed by the skin, leaving 
it neither sticky nor greasy. In fact 
gloves, even of delicate shades, will show 
no trace of the lotion, and they may be 
pulled on with no resistance. 

Usually, during the winter, after return 
ing from hours spent out of doors, the 
hands, like the face, become flushed if not 
quite red. Do not wash them immediately, 
but use instead a good hand lotion and 
work into the skin. 



The burden of Government still lies 
heavy on Australia. Expense of running 
the Commonwealth increased by 2,000,000 
this last financial year. Administrative 
expense tvs-o years ago was 15$ millions; 
to-day it is nearly 28 millions. The whole 
of the Social Service requirements last 
year (80,000,000) were entirely from 
revenue. More than 29,000,000, balance 
over from social service contributions and 
pay-roll tax monies, has been transferred 
to the National Service Fund, which now 
has nearly 100,000,000! We certainly are 
overtaxed. 



If movies cause all the wickedness now, 
what caused it in the old days when there 
were no movies! 



32 



^^^^^^^^"^^^^^^^^ 

Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 





HUR OWN CLOTHES 



Yes, it s easy to make your own clothes at home by the Ross Hynes 
"Home Dressmaker" Course. This new simplified method brings expert 
home dressmaking ability to every woman and girl. There s no need to 
deny yourself the "for every occasion" wardrobe you ve been wanting. Your dreams of plenty to wear 
can really come true. The magic of the "Home Dressmaker" makes dressmaking unbelievably easy. It 
ieaches you in a few weeks, in your own home, afl the secrets of 
dressmaking measuring, designing, cutting and professional 
finishing by the latest short-cut methods. 

COMPLETE HOME TUITION COURSE 

IN DRESSMAKING 

FULL COURSE ONLY . . . 

The "Home Dressmaker" is a complete course which shows 
you everything in a new practical, easy-to-follow way. This 
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Hynes Principal of the Ross Hynes College of Dressmaking, 
Sydney who is recognised as one of the leading authorities 
on style and clothes. No matter where you live, Mr. Ross 
Hynes remarkable Home Dressmaking Course brings Sydney 
instruction right into your home. 

EARN MONEY AT HOME 

When you have made all the clothes you need yourself you 
will find many friends who will gladly pay for your services. 
Your spare time will bring you extra money for dress materials, 
holidays and other pleasures. 



oecome o successful dressmaker you may 
return the "Home Dressmnker" within JO days 
and your money will be fully refunded. 





SAVE POUNDS 

You can ttarf to-day to possess o ward 
robe full of lovely clothes at so little cost 
create glamorous new eren/ng gowns, 
smart street wear and gorgeous play 
clothes all with the professional touch 
that will amaze your friends. Best of all, 
you can sore pounds and pounds on 
children s clothes new, re - made or 
renovated. 



NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED 

It does not matter if you have "never 
sewn a stitch," everything is explained 
for you, step by step, in simple, easy-to- 
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of illustrations. You cannot make a 
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making tutor of International repute. 
He has discovered this amazingly sim 
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FREE ADVICE SERVICE 

This course carries a FREE ADVICE SERVICE. 
At any time, and on any point, you may 
write to the Ross Hynes College, 
Sydney, and will receive a prompt and 
full reply just as you would in a class. 
No other course in Australia can give 
you this service. 




FREE MASTER FOUNDATION PATTERN 

if you order NOW! 

The Master Foundation Pa tern enables you to cut your own 
paper patterns in any style and in 16 different sizes. It is the 
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SENSAT10RA1 OFFER! 



SEND CQ0WN ,10-DAY-wmU SFOCKS USI 



Service Department, 

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SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEED. 

If you wish your 
NAME "Home Dressmaker" 

to be sent C.O.D.. 
ADDRESS please mark 

a cross in 
this square. 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



33 



BABY S FIRST SUIT 



Knitted in baby wool with lace insets 
and lazy daisies worked in white with a 
tiny yellow centre makes an adorable first 
suit for baby. 

Materials: 3 balls baby wool: thread of 
white and yellow wool; 4 small press studs; 



k. 2 tog. at both ends of the needle every 
2nd row until there are 57 sts. Continue 
on these 57 sts. until 68 rows have been 
worked from top of ribbing. Work two 
rows in stocking-st. and shape neck and 
shoulders as follows: K. 18, turn, and con- 




1 yard narrow ribbon; 2 
bone knitting needles \o. 
12 and 2 No. 10. 

Measurements: Length 
of jumper, 9$ inches; 
sleeve, 7^ inches; side of 
punts, 9 inches. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; 
p., purl; tog., together; 
sts., stitches; t.b.s., 
through back of st. 

The Jumper Front. 

Cast on <J8 sts. on No. 12 needles 
and work in a ribbing of k. 2, p. 2 
for 14 rows. Change to No. 10 needles and 
work as follows, decreasing 1 st. in end st. 
(67 sts.): 

Row 1 K. 27, p. 1, k. 1, p. 4, increase 4 
sts. for the shell thus: Drop next st. down 
1 row, then place that st. and the cross bar 
(made when the st. is dropped) on the let t- 
haiid needle: now k. 1, p. 1, k. 1, p. 1 all 
into the st. and bar that you just placed 
on the left-hand needle: p. next 4 sts., k. 1, 
p. 1, k. 27. 

Row 2 P. 27, k. 1, p. 1, k. 2, k. 2 tog., 
p. 5, k. 2 tog., k. 2. p. 1, k.. 1, p. 27. 

Row 3 K. 27, p. 1, k. 1, p. 2, m. 1, k. 2 
tog., k. 3, H. 1, k. 1. p.s.s.o., m. 1, p. 2, k. 1, 
p. 1, k. 27. 

Row 4 P. 27. k. 1, p. 1, k. 2. k. 1, t.b.s., 
m. 1, p. 2 tog., p. 1, p. 2 tog., in. 1, k. 1., 
t.b.s., k. 2, p. 1. k. ], p. 27. 

Row 6 K. 27. p. 1, k. 1, p. 3, k. 1, t.b.s., 
s. 1. k. 2 tog., p. B.s.o. , k. 1, t.b.s., p. 3, k. 1, 
p. 1, k. 27. 

Row 6 P. 27. k. 1, ]). 1. k. 9, p. 1, k. 1, 
p. 27. 

Repeat these six rows seven times more; 
then, keeping continuity of centre panel, 




tinue in Ntocking-st. on these 18 shoulder 
sts. for 12 rows. Cast off. 

Join wool at neck and cast off 21 sts. 
loosely for neck and work on remaining 18 
sts. to match other side. Cast off. 
Back. 

Cast on 68 sts. and work exactly as 
front ribbing until you have 67 sts. and 
changed to No. 10 needles. 

Continue in stocking-st. until same 
length as front to arinhole. then k. 2 tog. 
at both ends of the needle every 2nd row 
until you have 57 sts. Continue on. these 
.">7 sts. until back ie five rows shorter than 
front. Work on 18 sts., turn and work 
five rows. Cast off. 

Join wool at neck and cast off 21 sts. 
for neck, then work on remaining 18 sts. 
to match other side. 

Sleeve. 

Cast on 36 sts. on No. 12 needles and 
work in a ribbing of k. 2, p. 2 for 8 rows. 
Change to No. 10 needles, increasing 1 st. 
in end st. 37 sts. Now work in the centre 
panel of 13 sts. to match the juniper but 
commence and end with 10 sts. each side 
in stocking st. instead of 27 as in front of 
jumper. Work six rows on the 37 sts., then, 
taking care to keep centre correct, increase 
1 st. at both ends of the needle in the next 
and every following 6th row until you have 
53 sts. Shape top by k. 2 tog. at both ends 
of the needle in the next and every fol 
lowing 3rd row until 43 sts. remain. Cast 
off. Make other sleeve exactly the same. 
The Pants Front. 

Cast on 68 sts. on No. 10 needles and 
work in a ribbing of k. 2, p. 2 for six rows. 
Then make the ribbonholes thus: 

Row 7 * K. 2, m. 1,. k 2 tog., repeat 
from * to end of row. 

Work nine more rows of k. 2, p. 2 rib 
bing. Continue now in stocking stitch on 
the 68 sts. for six rows, then increase 1 st 
at both ends of the needle in the next and 
every following 6th row until there are !Sl 
sts. Work five rows without shaping, then 
cast off 4 sts. at beginning of everv row 
until there are 18 sts. Cast off. 



Back. 

Cast on 68 sts. and work ribbing as front, 
then shape as follows: 

Row 1 Knit to last 6 sts., turn. 

Row 2 P. to last 6 sts., turn. 

Continue in this way, working 6 ate. 
less each row until 20 centre sts. remain, 
turn and knit 24, turn and purl to end of 
row. Work six rows, then increase as 
given for front until there are 82 sts. 
Work five rows without shaping and cast 
off. 

Join centre seam together neatly and, 
using No. 12 needles, pick up and knit 
from right side of work 72 sts. across leg. 
Work in a ribbing of k. 2, p. 2 for six 
rows and cast off neatly ribwise. Work 
across other leg the same. 

To Make Up. 

Press carefully with a hot iron over a 
damp cloth; sew up side seams of pant* 
and thread ribbon through waist. Using 
No. 12 needles pick up and knit from right 
side of work, 9 sts. along side of neck of 
front of jumper, 18 sts. across front and 
9 sts. along other side. Knit four rows 
and cast off loosely. Work back of jumper 
with 4 sts. down each side of neck and 18 
sts. across back. Knit four rows and e-ast 
off. Sew front of jumper over back at 
armhole edge for $ inch. Sew in sleeves, 
then sew underarm and sleeve -Seams. 
Embroider three daisies along each side of 
centre panel and sew press-studs to fasten 
at shoulders. 




Designed for coolness and comfort, this 
smart beige linen working dress, 
modelled by B.C. P. A. hostess, Judy 
Marchant, has been specially made for 
wear while flying through the tropics. 
The dress, which will be worn only in 
the aircraft, features short sjeeves with 
turn-back cuffs and fly front, 



One critic has stated we need not go 
short of gas as there is plenty in Canberra. 
Unfortunately it is not the illuminating 
type. 



34 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



UUM imff 

PRIFERMtBEST 




\our Dentist 

knows best . . 

He recommends "Steradent 11 




"Steradent is recommended 
as the most modern, scientific 
way to clean false teeth. 

"Steradent" harmlessly removes 
unsightly stains on false teeth, 
dentures, or bridges. Discoloured 
teeth become clean and lustrous. 

"Steradent" is harmless to the 
materials of which dentures are 
usually made, including the new 
acrylic resins. 

So/c/ by Cftemis. s only. 4105 



Steradent 



Reckitt & Colman (Australia) Ltd. 
naceutical D 



So busy have British doctors become, 
under Health Act conditions, that one is 
reported to have a sign in his waiting- 
room: "Please have your symptoms ready." 



A lot of "Reds," who spend their time 
declaring war on organised society, always 
seem to be pained and surprised when 
organised society takes up the challenge. 



HEADACHE 

fast Relief 
vtiih 



BAYERS 
ASPIRIN 



TABLETS! 



24 for 1 3 
100 for 4 



Make 

baby s 

hair 

grow 

curly 




If far from town send postal note or 
stamps to Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney. 




sore 

for the relief of 

Chest Colds, 

Chills, Pleurisy, 

Pneumonia, 

always use 

WAWN S 
WONDER 

WOOL 




Left-over vegetables can be heated up 
this way: Put them into a colander on a 
piece of greaseproof paper and steam over 
a little boiling water for a few minutes. 



Australian Home Journal, September I, 1949 



39 




Smocking, gathers, shirring, etc., are 
often difficult to keep fresh and clean. The 
use of an ordinary nail brush, together 
with warm sudsy water, will help con 
siderably. Just brush the parts gently 
with the brush which has been dipped in 
the sudsy water. Wash and rinse in the 
ordinary way. For stubborn soiled marks 
at collar and cuff lines this brush idea is 
ideal. 

Water is a very important factor in 
washing. Soft water is preferred for wash 
ing because it reacts with the soap to form 
suds quickly and with no waste of soap. 
Hard water uses up more soap because part 
of the soap has to go towards softening 
the water, unless some water-softener is 
used. The most common of water soften 
ers are trisodium phosphate, washing soda, 
and borax. Borax is not as effective, but 
it is less damaging to the skin and to finer 
fabrics. 

Sorting. 

The first step of any family wash con 
sists of sorting the clothes. Separate the 
white things from the coloured, so that 
the former may have the advantage of hot 
suds which would be hard on colours. 
Divide the silks and wools from the cot 
tons, because both of these fabrics are less 
sturdy and require more careful handling. 

Separate the heavy things from the thin 
ones and the very dirty from the slightly 
soiled. If they were put in together the 
clean things would be contaminated. Sort 
ing saves times and effort later on and 
often prevents more or less serious damage. 
Ask any woman how much havoc one black 
cotton sock can cause in a tub of white 
clothes; how one very dirty cleaning cloth 

[Turn to page 40.] 
PAINFUL FEET. 

Bunions We have an excellent home remedy 
for bunions, it will help reduce them and banish 
all pain, 7/6 post free. Corns hard or soft, 
removed by our special corn salve, 3/6 jar post 
free. Callous on feet permanently removed no 
matter how long-standing. KALOS. 6/- jar 
post free. Send 6d. for advice on all foot 
troubles to SISTER WARD SMITH. Desk I, 
Box 32. P.O.. Pacific Highway. Crow s Nest. 




"Sandwiches 1 

are more nourishing with 

KRAFT CHEESE" 




says 

EL1ZAMTH COOKE 

Kraft Cookery and 

Nutrition Expert 



It s true! Kraft Cheese is 
chock full of Proteins, Vita 
mins A, B2, D, calcium, 
phosphorus and other valuable 
nutrients of milk. And what 
flavour! Kraft Cheese captures 
I hat true cheddar flavour 
everybody enjoys. When you 
eat sandwiches make sure some 
of them contain thick, generous 



slices of mellow, golden Kraft 
Cheese it s so good for you. 

Kraft Cheese is a 
Bargain in Nutrition. 

There is no rind on Kraft 
Cheese. Kvery half pound 
packet contains a full eight 
ounces of smooth, matured 
cheese there s not a bit of 
waste because Kraft Cheese 
sta>s fresh to the last slice in 
I its hygienic foil wrapper. 

KRAFT 
CHEESE 



TASTES BETTER BEC4USE IT S BLENDED BETTER 




(-97 



40 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



CUT OUT THIS RECIPE 



A Cadbury Kecipe 
Jor the Children s launch-box 




CHOCOLATE MUFFINS 

J Ib. S.R. flour i teaspoon salt 

3 ozs. brown sugar 3 ozs. margarine or butter 

1 heaped tablespoonful Bournvillc cocoa 

1 egg 1 cup milk grated lemon rind 

1 tablespoonful candied peel, shredded 

Method: Sift flour, cocoa and salt. Melt shortening with 
sugar, add rind, peel, beaten egg and enough milk to make 
a rather stiff cake mixture. Half fill 8 deep greased patty 
or muffin tins. Bake in a quick oven (400F) for 15 minutes. 

Give the children Bournville Cocoa regularly, its nourish 
ing goodness will do them a world of good as a daily 
drink. In cooking it imparts that rich chocolaty flavour 
which they cannot resist. Not only is Bournvillc Cocoa 
wholesome it economical too. You get "120 cups 
to the Ib." and the price is now reduced to l/7d. a hall 
pound. (In Metropolitan areas.) 



BOURNVILLE COCOA 



822 1 29 



EVERY 

EXPECTANT MOTHER 




TWEEDS a well-balanced diet throughout 

Pregnancy, with emphasis laid on 

Vitamins and Mineral Salts elements ab.io 

Icteiy essential to make good the strain on 

her own system, and ior the building up ot 

the child s frame, muscles and nervous 

ystem. These essential Vitamins and 

Mineral Salts are often lacking in t <e 

ordinary daily food and it is here that Bio 

Chemistry can help the Expectant Mother 

so much. 

There are Twelve Bio-Chemic Nerve and Tissue-Building Cell Salts, supplying every 

need of the human system. Individual requirements are thoroughly investigated 

only one or two of these vital life-giving Cell Salts may be lacking and your exact 

need supplied. Thus the Expectant Mother is assured of an abundant reserve of 

nerve force, a more comfortable confinement, more speedy recovery and a rich supply 

of natural milk. All consultations tree of charge or obligation. 

Write for FREE BOOKLET giving valuable advice and information. 
S,,nd to Dept. A.H.J. 9. 

Established 20 Year*. 



BIO-CHEMIC INSTITUTE 



BOX 1249 L, G.P.O., MELBOURNE. 
Office: 108 QUEEN STREET. MELBOURNE, C.I. Phone: MU 1971. 



Tht-orists who try to abolish poverty 
seldom are able to see that a lot of other 
things must be abolished first. 



The trouble about some of the aliens who 
knock at our gates is that they intend to 
knock at our Government. 



Caundry 



[From page 39.] 

can distribute its greyness over a whole 
tub of table linen and sheets; what hap 
pens to a woollen garment accidentally put 
into the boiler with other clothes. Look 
for stains while sorting, and those which 
need special attention can be treated 
before washing. 

Soaking. 

There are several satisfactory ways of 
soaking clothes and, of course, it is under 
stood that only the white and fast-coloured 
cottons and linens should receive this pre 
liminary treatment. They may be covered 
with clear cold water alone, or with the 
addition of a small amount of washing 
soda. A light suda may be used, luke 
warm or cold. Or the badly soiled parts 
of clothes may be rubbed with soap, rolled 
up in individual bundles, placed in a tub 
and covered with cold water. 

Insufficient rinsing is probably respons 
ible for more than half of the dingy- 
looking clothes encountered in a day s 
walk. Two rinses are essential and more 
will tend to make the clothes whiter. 

Clothes should never be put into the 
bluing rinse without loosening the folds, 
for unless the blue can reach all parts of 
each piece it is very likely to b deposited 
in streaks. . 

Although heavy starching went out of 
style with stiff-bosomed shirts, it ia still 
advisable to use a light starch for curtains. 
aprons, children s cotton dresses, etc., for 
it will help keep the articles clean a longer 
time, as dirt will not stick to smooth stir 
faces as it does to rough ones. 

In hanging clothes out to dry, it is more 
convenient to place like garments together. 
This makes a better appearance and saven 
re-sorting when the clothes are removed 
from the line ready for folding and 
sprinkling. 

Warm water is more satisfactory than 
cold water for dampening clothes, aa it 
penetrates the fabric more qniekly. Some 
times clothes can be removed from the line 
before thoroughly dry and rolled up with 
out sprinkling. This saves time and 
handling. When rolling dampened clothe? 
always fold in the hems and edges. Cover 
the damp clothes with another damp cloth 
to prevent escape of moisture. Never leave 
dampened clothes long before ironing, for 
mildew will form. 

Folding. 

Folding of clothes is largely a matter of 
convenience. Sheets, pillowcases, towels 
and other flat things should be folded to 
fit the shelves or drawers where they are 
kept. Sheets are usually folded in half 
lengthwise then again folded in half 
lengthwise. Now fold in as many cross 
wise folds as desired; folding thus makes 
it easier to distinguish between single and 
double sheets. Table linen is usually folded 
in half and again in fourths, or in the case 
of serviettes often in thirds. It is a wise 
practice to change the position of the folds 
occasionally,, as table linen is often worn 
out more by pressing than by use. 



STAMPS NOT ACCEPTED. 

Readers are again reminded that 
we do not take postage stamps in 
payment of pattern orders. Only 
postal notes or money orders will 
be accepted. 



Australian Home journal, oeptemoer i 



That Empty Biscuit Barrel! 

[From page 35.] 

n cool plaee until it becomes firm. Take 
small pieces of the dough and form into 
halls about the size of a walnut. Mix to 
Aether a tablespoonful of canter sugar and 
J level teaapoonful ground cinnamon, and 
coat the balls with this. Place some dis 
tance apart on a greused oven tray, and 
hake in a moderate oven for about lf> 
minutes. 



Savoy Biscuits. 

Beat well together \ Ib. of caster 
sugar, with .1 eggs, for about 20 min 
utes, then add 1 Ib. of fine, dry flour. 
Work all together lightly into a soft, light 
dough or thick batter, lay a wafer-paper 
on a baking tin, then put the mixture into 
a biscuit funnel and drop it out on the 
paper about the size of a walnut. Sift 
sugar over them and bake them in a hot 
oven. These biscuits would be much richer 
if more eggs could be allowed. 

"Drop biscuits" can be made in the sa mi- 
way, only some caraway seeds should be 
added. 



Embroidered tablecloths, table runners, 
duchesse. seta, and traycloths should always 
be ironed on the wrong side to press up the 
embroidery; other starched articles are 
ironed on the right side to give a glossy 
finish. 



EVERY WOMAN SHOULD 
READ THIS TABLE 



HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


5 


M2lbs. 


5 1- 
__5 2" 
_5 3" 

5 4" 


118 Ibs. 


_!20lbs. 
124 Ibs. 
125 Ibs. 


if These ore AVERAGE 
weights tor a healthy 
woman. 




I can quickly 
solve your weight 
problem . . . 

No maHer w^st 
your age, whether 
you are o- er-weigh or under 
weight, I can, and wi : l,, ho p 
ycu. First thing to do is fill 
in diagram below and I will 
send you my interest no pub 
lication on beauty, togcf! er 
with your peisona! measure 
ments. Enclose 4^d. for 
postage. 

FREE! Complete Chart 
showing your ideal 
measurements . . . 

Fill this in to-nighf. 



AGE 




HEIGHT 




WEIGHT 




OFFICE 
USE ON Y 


Dept. F 



T. A. LANGRIDGE 

271 GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 



2/462 





Itf *% Jl C I I C J 

they re particularly suitable for infants 
and nursing mothers. 




18 IN TINS 1/9 



The 

LAXATIVE 

KNOWN and TRUSTED 
FOR 40 YEARS 



GENTLE, EFFECTIVE, 
SAFE, RELIABLE 

LAXETTES contain phanoiphlhalein, which is 
non-hat t forming and is one of the safest 
and most reliable laxative substances known 
to medica! science. This is incorporated in the 
finest block chocolate by an exclusive, 
scientific process, which ensures accurate 
dosage and strict conformity to British 
Pharmacopoeia standards. 



SAMPLE 
COUPON 

SEND 2 .-d 

stamp to covor 

postage and 

packing ... to Laxette Mfg. Co., 3M Swanston Street, Melbourne 



^ LETTERS 
I PLEASE 



AHj 949 



> I 7*17 




Many a husband is deceived 
into thinking that women have 
no interest outside their home 
and clothes . . . that such things 

as finance arc- out of their world. However, the average 
housewife, who balances her weekly budget, has a far better 
financial brain than many a business executive! That is why 
women should know something about this business of Life 
Assurance, which affects them so vitally. 

Life Assurance enables a man to make provision for a defin 
ite sum of money to be paid by die Life Office upon his death 
or when he reaches a particular age. 

But there is even more to it than this! By the careful in 
vestment of your premiums your Life Offices earn extra profits 
which are added to the sum for whkh you are assured. These 
additional benefits arc known as bonuses . . . they are the 
"plus" in your policy. 

At the same time, these premiums which have been invested 
for your benefit, are al>o aiding the development of Australia. 
That is why . . . 

THREE MILLION POLICYHOLDERS ... SEVEN AND 
A HALF MILLION AUSTRALIANS ... BENEFIT BY 

LIFE ASSURANCE 

ISSUED BY THE LEADING LIFE ASSURANCE OFFICES IN AUSTRALIA 




, ,, .,,,,,,,. ...... , 

For baby s 

good health 

Only a healthy baby can be a 
happy baby. Steedman s Powders 
can help ensure the good health of 
your child, for Steedman s is a safe 
and gentle aperient that aids regular 
habits and cools the blixxlstreaiu. 
You can give Steedman s with full 
confidence for they have been usec! 
by thousands of Mothers for over 
100 years. Remember, for baby s 
good health . . . 



. 

SFEEDMANiS 

POWDERS 



ON SALE AT ALL CHEMISTS 

"" " "" 9004B 



FORD PILLS 




Mary, Mary, was contrary, 
But now is bright and gay; 
Her headaches are vanished. 
Her pimples are banished; 
She takes Ford Pills each day. 

Ford Pills are the gentle, 
tasteless, painless laxative for 
all your family. In plastic 
tubes, 2/6 everywhere. 



FORD PILLS 



MAN WORKED OVERTIME 



WHILE LEG HEALED 

Varex Treatment has been quite suc 
cessful on that bad leg of mine a miracle 
in fact. In five weeks the wound healed 
up completely and I never lost an hour s 
work from the first day. In fact, I have 
been working overtime on it three days a 
week. I have not failed to tell people of 
your simple and cheap cure." Write 
to-day for free Varex Booklet. Ernest 
Healey, Pharmaceutical Chemist, Varex. 
Rooms 523-524, 5th Floor, St. James 
Building, I09W Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



47 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[TURNINGS MUST BE ALLOWED FOR ON ALL PATTERNS] 



FROCK, 7444. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Skirt Front and Back. Pin skirt pattern 
over a double thickness of paper and mark 
from notch at side through all punchholes 
and then in a straight line to centre front. 
Cut around the entire outer edge, then cut 
along the marked line. Use one piece for 
the front and the other piece for the back, 
and along the side of back piece cut off l| 
inches. Cut a pattern for back 
hip yoke from the one provided 
for the front, and along the side 
cut off 1^ inches to correspond 
with skirt back. 

Collar and Facing. Cut a 
straight piece of paper 5 inches 
wide and 16 inches long. Told in 
halves lengthwise and then cross 
wise; cut from the folded 
edge through all thick 
nesses to a point 1 inch 
from the end, thus making 
the outside edge 16 inches 
long and neck edge 14 
inches. Mark the facing 
on bodice front as indi 
cated, 1$ inches wide at 
shoulders and 1$ inches 
longer than the opening 
at centre front. Trace the 
shape of this to paper and 
cut out as shown. 






FOLD OF MATERIAL 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: As this 
pattern has been cut for the average 36- 
inch figure it will be necessary to see 
whether alterations are needed for the in 
dividual figure. Pin pieces together, re 
membering that seam and hem allowances 
are not included. Place pattern over figure 
and observe fitting. If bodice front anol 
back are too long, shorten by folding be 
tween armhole and waistline, and if too 
short, cut in same place and insert sufficient 



paper to provide additional length required. 
To increase pattern, pin additional strips 
of paper along seam edges where the extra 
width is required, and to decrease pattern, 
trim away pattern edges where additional 
width is not needed. Remove pattern from 
figure, take apart, press flat, even up all 
seam edges. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Pin pattern to 
material as shown in cutting guide. Cut 
out with allowance of 2 inches 
for skirt hem, 1 inch on under 
arm seams and \ inch on all 
other edges. Before removing 
pattern from material, mark 
clearly with tailor s chalk or 
tacking exact seam lines, 
notches and punchholes to en 
sure accuracy when joining 
pieces together. 

Step 4. Gathering: Lengthen 
machine stitch a trifle, and 
along bodice and skirt edges 
marked "Gather", do five rows 
of stitching \ inch apart and 
commencing | inch from raw 
edge. Draw up threads on in 
side only to fit spaces between 
notches on bodice back, and 
hip yokes. Tie threads and 
arrange fulness evenly. 

Step 5. Bodice: Join front to 
back at shoulders in plain 
seams, press open and neaten. 
Pin neck edge of collar to neck 
edge of bodice with right sides 
together. Machine in place, 
clip allowance every \ inch 
across fronts, and press 
seam open on fronts only. 
Pin other edge of collar to 
i neck edge of facings and 
4 join together in same way. 
\ Pin facings to fronts with 
right sides together, mach 
ine across ends of collar 
and down to notch at centre 
front on both sides. 
; r] Pin fronts together in a 
plain seam and machine 
from notch down to lower 
edge. Press centre front 
seam open, turn collar and 
facings right side out. Slip- 
stitch edges of facing to 
gether below notch at centre front, turn 
under raw edges on facing, machine 
through fold only and tie-stitch to seam 
allowance at centre front and shoulder. 

Turn under raw edge of collar and hem 
to previous row of stitching across back 
neck line. Pin darts in back on the inside 
and machine from waistline, tapering 
stitching gradually to nothing. Tie threads 
and press away from centre. 

Step 6. Skirt: Join fronts together at 
centre front and backs together at centre 
back in plain seams, press open and neaten. 
Turn under allowance on lower edges of 
yokes and pin to gathered edges of skirt. 
Tack, machine as close as possible to seam 
edge, press and neaten. Turn under allow 
ance at waistline, pin to bodice, tack, 
machine, press and neaten. Pin front and 
back at sides and leave an opening about 
3 inches above and 4 inches below waist 
line on left side. Try on to observe fitting. 
Let out or take in searn allowance if desir 
able. Machine seams, press open and 
neaten. 



Step 7. Side Opening: Attach a zipper to 
side opening or cut two facing strips of 
self-material If inches wide and 1 inch 
longer than opening, with one edge along 
selvedge. Pin strips to front and back 
edges of opening with raw edges together 
and right sides of material facing. Machine 
\ inch from edges, press seams open and 
fold strips under so that selvedges are 
exactly under seam lines. Tack in place, 
machine \ inch from edge, press front or 
upper-side under on seam line, but allow 
back to extend under front. Tie-stitch 
strips together at top and bottom. Sew 
hooks and bars to side opening if zipper 
is not used. 

Step 8. Sleeve Edges and Pads: Finish 
lower edges with self-material bias facing 
strips \\ inches wide. Machine on right 
side, turn to inside, press, turn under raw 
edge and slip-stitch in place. Cut a pat 
tern for sleeve pads from a piece of paper 
9 inches long and 5 inches wide. Fold 
paper in halves crosswise and cut from the 
centre on one side in a curved line to tho 
cut ends on the other side. Open out pat 
tern and cut four pieces of self-material 
from it. 

For each shoulder pad, provide a piece 
of cotton wool same shape as pad, but omit 
seam allowance. Pin to inside of pad and 
draw padding away from outside edges, 
tapering it to nothing at points and keep 
ing it thickest in centre of longest side. 
Tack together and keep all long stitches on 
the cotton wool side. Pin padding facing 
to pad, right sides together, and machine 
along two sides. Turn right side out, turn 
under raw edges and oversew together. 
Tie-stitch pads to frock with the centre in 
line with shoulder seam and the longest 
side extending about f inch beyond the 
normal length of shoulder seam. 

Step 9. Belt: -Make belt, finish with a 
buckle and apply loops at sides to hold it 
in place. 

Step 10. Finishing: Allow frock to hang 
overnight. Try on and mark a becoming 
length with chalk or pins, measuring up an 
even distance from floor. Turn the hem, 
secure by hand and complete with final 
pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
3f yards 36 inches wide. 

[ For 34-inch bust, take \ inch off side 
seams of front and back. For 38-inch bust, 
allow \ inch on side seams of front and 
back.] 

- 

FROCK, 9112. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Bodice. Separate front from back by cut 
ting along shoulder line which is indicated 
by punchholes. For side front cut from 
the waistline up through punchholes to 
the notch at neck line. 

Collar. Pin centre back of bodice to a 
fold of paper and mark the shape of collar 
from one notch through all punchholes- 
back to the other notch. Cut out on marked 
line. 

Sleeve. Place straight edge to a fold of 
paper and cut out around the entire outer 
edge through both thicknesses. 

Step 2. Cutting Material: Pin pattern to- 
material as shown in cutting guide and 
mark off \\ widths 8 inches deep for skirt,, 
and 3 widths 2 inches wide, plus the usual 
seam allowances for skirt frill. For bodice 
and sleeve frills cut strips \\ inches wide 
three times the spaces to which they are to 
be attached, or use a lace edging. 

Step 3. Gathering: Join skirt pieces to 
gether in plain seams, join skirt frills in 
[Turn to page 49.] 



48 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



WEEK 
AFTER WEEK 

Week after week, on 
the same day, you will 
see the same people de 
positing money to their 
Commonwealth Savings Bank 
Accounts. It may be pounds, 
or perhaps a few shillings, but 
it is steadily accumulating to 
provide for their future comfort 
and security. They realise how 
wise it is to save regularly so 
that money will buy more 
when production can meet 
the demand. Experience a 
sense of security by 
opening and using an 
account in the 




MMNWEALT 




C.S.B. 29-42 



When 




Dimness, stain and tarnish 
vanish beneath the gentle 
touch of Silvo. This safe 
liquid polish will preserve 
and protect the lovely sur 
face of silverware. 




The ability to speak several languages is 
valuable, but the ability to keep your 
mouth shut in one language is priceless. 



"Father, what s a committee?" 
"A committee is a body that keeps 
minutes and wastes hours." 



They are truly blessed" 

act 




A mixture of 
finely ground 
curative herbs, 
blended in the 
tradition of thu 
monks of old. No 
preparation 
needed. 



FATHER, w PIERRE S 



m , w PIERRES <^ * 

Monastery Betts 

Nature s own treatment for CONSTIPA 
TION, INDIGESTION, ACIDITY, RHEU 
MATISM, BAD BLOOD, GOUT, LIVER and 
KIDNEY COMPLAINTS. SKIM DISEASES. 
Monastery Herbs quickly cleanse the 
system and blood of their disease-causing 
poisons. Painful and distressing symptoms 
are banished by taking a quarter tea- 
spoonful of Monastery Herbs with meals 
two or three times a day. They may be 
taken dry on the tongue and washed 
down by a drink, if preferred. Taken 
regularly, Monastery Herbs will rouse the 
liver, purify the stomach and intestines 
and cleanse the blood. Relief comes 
quickly. Constipation, Indigestion, Rheu 
matism vanish rapidly. 

Nature will restore your health. 

Monastery Herbs contain no drugs. 
minerals or chemicals. They are Nature s 
own remedy, skilfully prepared to restore 
your health, good spirits and energy. 

Sole Proprietors: MONKSEATON HERBALISTS 
LTD.. 52 Peru St., Salford, 3 Lanes., England. 

SEND THIS COUPON NOW/ 

Send 1/6 Postal Note for I 01. package 
of Monastery Herbs. Post free. This will 
bring you by post an ample supply for a 
thorough-going test of the virtues of this 
natural aid to good healrh. Send to-day. 
8 oz. size also available at IO/-, post free. 

COMMONWEALTH & DOMINION AGENCIES 
PTY. LTD., Box 2949, G.P.O., Sydney. N.S.W. 



NAME. 



ADDRESS- 



For Nearly 

Half a Century 

Men and women have relied upon 
KOKO for the Hair. Twice-a-day 
scalp massage with KOKO tones up 
the hair roots and eradicates unsightly 
dandruff. KOKO, the famous British 
Hair Preparation, is free from oil, 
grease and dye. 

Ask your Chemist for 

KOKO 

FOR THE HAIR 



You can get just about anything you 
want in life if you just wait until you 
don t want it. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 



49 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 47.] 

one continuous piece. Finish lower edge 
of all frills with a narrow hem secured by 
machine. Lengthen machine stitch a trifle 
and along upper and lower edges of sleeves 
do two rows of stitching i inch apart and 
commencing \ inch from raw 
edge. Draw up both threads on 
lower edge of sleeves to fit the 
child s arm. Tie threads and 
arrange fulness in even gathers. 
Do two rows of stitching on upper 
edge of all frills and upper edge 
of skirt in same way. Draw 
up all gathering threads, 
those on bodice frill to fit 
the side front and back 
bodice edges, on sleeve frills 



S PART OF SKIRT 

ALLOW (^ WIDTHS 
OF 36" MATERIAL 




to fit lower edge of sleeves, on skirt frill 
to fit lower edge of skirt and on skirt to 
fit bodice waistline. Tie threads and 
arrange all fulness in even gathers. 

Step 4. Bodice: Join side fronts to back 
at underarms in plain seams, press open 
and neaten. Clip around side fronts at 
intervals, then turn under seam allowance, 
continuing from front neckline right round 
back bodice up again to front neckline. 
Tack frilling in position, machine as close 
as possible to seam edges. 

Join front panel to front skirt in an 
overlap seam. Tack side fronts to panel 
and back bodice to back skirt, being care 
ful in so doing to catch in all edges and 
seeing that frilling is in position. Machine 
close to seam edge. Join front to back at 
shoulders in plain seams, press open and 
neaten. 

Step 5. Collar and Neck Opening: Pin 
collar to facing with right sides together, 
machine around outer edge, cut away excess 
seam allowance, turn right side out and 
press. Pin collar to outside of bodice with 
neck edges together. Cut a facing 2$ inches 
wide and \\ inches longer than opening at 
.centre front. Place centre of this facing 



exactly over centre of bodice. Cut a self- 
material bias strip f inch wide, tack to 
neck edge and join ends to front facings. 
Machine around marked neck line and then 
\ inch each side of centre front line down to 
bottom of opening. Cut on centre front line 
almost to stitching at bottom, cut away 
excess seam allowance around neck, turn 
facing to inside, press, turn 
under raw edge of front facing, 
machine through fold only, turn 
under raw edge of bias and hem 
to bodice. Close neck opening 
with tiny buttons and work but 
tonhole bars to match. 

Step 6. Seams: Join sleeve 
seams in plain seams, press 
open and neaten. Pin frills 
to sleeves, finish lower edge 
with a self-material bias fac 
ing strip | inch wide, applied 
in same way as facing around 
\ neckline. Pin sleeves 

to armholes with seams 
matching and draw up 
both threads across 
tops and arrange ful 
ness in even gathers. 
Machine and neaten 
raw edges by overcast 
ing. Finish with final 
pressing. 

Pattern is for child 
of 4 years. Material: 
i yard 36 inches wide. 
Contrast: \ yard 36 inches 
wide. 

FROCK, 7445. 
Step 1, Completing Pat 
tern: 

Skirt. Use pat 
tern provided 
and cut in a 
straight line 
from notch at 

top to one at bottom and use 

the other edge of this panel for 

centre front and centre back 

line. Pin remaining piece to 

another piece of paper, cut 

out around the outer edge, 

then cut off \\ inches from 

the entire side for the side 

back panel. 

Bodice Back. Using back 

given for Pattern 7444, 

mark from notch at the 

shoulder seam, following 

punchholes, and then off to 

nothing at the waistline. If 

padded shoulders are not 
needed, shorten shoulder 

seams by cutting off \ inch 

at armhole end and shape a 

new armhole curve off to 
nothing about halfway 
down armhole, as shown on 
cutting guide. Cut off \ 
inch at armhole end of 
shoulder seam on both front 
and back and taper seam 
line to nothing at neck end. 
Sleeve. Pin half-sleeve 
to a large sheet of paper, 
mark along punchholes in 
dicating underarm curve. 
Fold paper along straight 
edge and cut around arm- 
hole, underarm and lower 
edge through both thick 
nesses. Notch armhole, 
open out new pattern and 
cut along previously 
marked underarm curve. 



Front Facing. Mark a facing for front 
and collar as indicated by broken line on 
cutting guide and cut out as shown. 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: See Step 
2, Pattern 7444. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: See Step 3, 
Pattern 7444. 

Step 4. Buttonholes: Mark position and 
size of each buttonhole (which should be a 
trifle larger than width of buttons) on 
right-hand side of bodice and arrange for 
end of buttonhole to be inch from front 
edge. Cut binding strips f inch wide and 
f inch longer than size of buttonhole. Fold 
strips in halves lengthwise, press, tack to 
garment with raw edges meeting exactly 
over mark and ends extending an even 
distance beyond mark. Machine along 
centre of each strip and do not take stitch 
ing beyond marked line. Tie all ends 
securely on the inside. Cut along marked 
line to within \ inch of each end and then 
diagonally to ends of stitching. Turn raw 
edges of binding strips Jo the inside and 
press with folded edges meeting exactly in 
centre. On the inside pin the triangular 
piece at each end to binding strips, fold 
garment back out of way and machine 
across each end through all thicknesses. 
Tie threads and press again. 

Step 5. Bodice: Join collar at centre back 
in a plain seam and press open. Machine 
| inch from neck end of shoulder seam 
just outside the marked shoulder line right 
to the corner and then along neck edge for 
| inch just outside marked neck line. Make 
a diagonal cut right 
to stitching at corner, 
but take care not to 
cut the stitching. Pin 
bodice front and back 
together at shoulders 
and neck edge of col 
lar to neck edge of 
bodice with right 
sides of material fac 
ing. Machine from 
one end of shoulder 
across to other end in 




50 



Australian Home Journal, September 1 , 1 949 



OUR FREE PATTERNS Married at Gretna Green 



[From page 49."] 

one continuous seam. Press shoulder seams 
open and neateu raw edges, press seam 
across neck with allowances together and 
extending upwards. 

Step 6. Collar Facing: Join facing at 
centre back in a plain seam, press open 
and pin to bodice with right sides together. 
Machine up front, around collar and down 
front on other side. Cut away excess seam 
allowance to a inch of stitching, turn 
facing to inside, press, turn under all raw 
edges, machine through fold only and tack 
in place down fronts. Hem turned edge 
across shoulders and neck edge to the pre 
vious row of stitching on the inside. Cut 
openings in facing exactly under each 
buttonhole, turn under raw edges, hem to 
bindings and press again. Lap right-hand 
side of bodice over left with centre front 
lines exactly over each other and tack 
together. Sew buttons on left side to 
correspond with buttonholes, then on the 
right-hand side for double-breasted effect. 

Step 7. Skirt: Join front and back panels 
to side fronts and side backs in plain seams. 
Press open and neaten. Fold pleats on 
single punchholes and pin with edges 
exactly over seams. Press lightly, tack 
together along top. Join skirt to bodice 
and finish opening at side in same way as 
described in Steps 6 and 7, Pattern No. 
7444. 

Step 8. Sleeves: Join at underarms in 
plain seams, press open and neaten. Cut 
a self-material fitted facing 2 inches wide 
for lower edge. Join at underarm in a 
plain seam, press open, pin right side of 
facing to inside of sleeve, machine, turn 
facing to outside, turn under raw edge, 
pin to sleeve and machine in place. Pin 
sleeves to armholes with notches meeting 
and ease across tops. Make pads as de 
scribed in Step 8 and pin to sleeves. Try 
on and note whether shoulder width is be 
coming and sleeves correctly set in. Alter 
if necessary, unpin pads, machine sleeves, 
press seams open across upper half of arm- 
hole, replace pads, tie-stitch to seam allow 
ance around armholes and neaten raw 
edges by overcasting. 

Step 9. Finishing: Make belt and finish 
hem as described in Steps 9 and 10, Pat 
tern No. 7444. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
3J yards 36 inches wide. 

[For alterations to other sizes, see No. 
7444 description.] 



St. Peter: "You say that you were a poli 
tician while on earth?" 
Applicant: "Yes." 
St. Peter: "This lift, please." 
Applicant: "How soon does it go up?" 
St. Peter: "It doesn t go up; it goes 
down." 



Picture shows and amusements generally 
are being hard hit these days. Owing to 
the limited transport, people in the suburbs 
are forced to stay at home, and the stagger 
ing of amusement hours, while suitable to 
the electric lighting heads, is very awkward 
for the public. 

A Capetown newspaper correspondent 
says the South African Government will 
eliminate the Union Jack from the South 
African flag and will also abolish "God 
Save the King." The disintegration of the 
British Empire is certainly continuing, 
and the work of its builders is being slowly 
but surely undone. 



[From page 13.] 

With knees which seemed to have 
turned to jelly, Peggy went along the 
passage, Vera following her. A tall man 
in sergeant s uniform stood outside. 

"My name is Cairns," he announced; 
"I m from the police station at Wynlougli. 
I want to see a girl named Margaret 
Brown." 

"Come into the parlour," said Vera, "and 
you, too, Peggy. - I don t want my aunt 
to hear the disgrace you ve brought upon 
us." 

"You ve no right to say that yet, ma am, 
unless you know more than we do." He 
turned to Peggy as he spoke: "Are you 
the lassie known as Margaret Brown?" His 
searching but kindly eyes softened as they 
looked at the giri. He had young daught 
ers of his own, and Peggy, though she was 
twenty-two, looked like a girl of sixteen 
in her simple cotton frock. 

"My name is Margaret Brown." she 
answered, "though I m always known as 
Peggy." 

"Well, now, I want you to tell us all 
about this affair." He had a copy of the 
paper with him and he pointed to the 
photo. 

Vera frowned. She considered he was 
speaking far too gently to this chit of a 
girl. Peggy, sensing his kindly feeling, 
told him the whole story of what had hap 
pened, including last night. 

"Well, lassie," said the sergeant when 
she had finished, "you ve told that nice 
and clearly. I think now the best thing 
will be to come along to the station and 
repeat it to the Inspector. He ll be able, 
likely, to give you some advice, too, about 
this marriage of yours. Oh, you fool 
ish girls, with your love of romance." 

"I m cured of romance once and for all," 
Peggy declared, and wondered why the 
sergeant smiled. 

Peggy, shaking with nervousness as she 
entered the police station, was strangely 
comforted by the sight of Jimmy Vane 
standing talking to the Inspector. There 
was also a flashy, highly-painted woman 
sitting on a bench. She sprang up on see 
ing Peggy. 

"Why, this is the girl who stole my hus 
band," she burst out; "you thief, you 
husband-snatcher. If I hadn t seen the 
photo in " 

"That s enough," said the sergeant 
sternly. Then he said to the Inspector: 
"This young lady seems to have had a 
rough deal, sir. I d like you to hear what 
she has told me." 

"Very good; she can tell me in front of 
the prisoner. I want to confront him with 
this woman." He led the way into his 
office and a few minutes later Keggie was 
brought in. 

The woman sprang to her feet again 
when she saw him. 

"You villain," she shrieked; "I ll give 
you away for this. I ll tell all I know 
about you, yeu bigamist. Am I or am I 
not, your lawful wife? Isn t this girl 
only your accomplice?" 

Eeggie glanced from her raddled, painted 
face to the pure childish one of Peggy. 
His hard eyes softened as he met the 
pleading look of the girl. 

"Yes, unfortunately, you are my wife," 
he drawled. "But this young lady is not 
my accomplice, only my victim as the 
melodramas used to say. Also, I find she s 
from my own town, where the girjs are a 
very different sort from you Londoners. 
Look here. Inspector," he turned around to 
the officer, "I ll come clean; I ll make a 



statement, owning up to it all. Peggy 
Brown had nothing to do with it what 
ever. She was away at the time. I had 
never seen her before in my life. I went 
to the house afterwards, thinking it was 
she who had seen me, and recognised me 
as a native of these parts." He stopped 
for breath and nodded to the man taking 
down what he was saying in shorthand. 
Then he went on: 

"We misunderstood each other. She 
said she had recognised me. She meant 
she d seen me in old times. I thought she 
meant on that night. So I persuaded her 
to marry me in order that she couldn t give 
evidence against me. If it hadn t been 
for those nosey reporters with their 
cameras, I d have got away all right." 

"And left Miss Brown with the idea that 
she was married! You re a thorough scoun 
drel and deserve all that s coming to you." 
The Inspector turned away from him in 
disgust and spoke to Peggy. 

"Well, my dear, you can go now. I m 
thankful you ve had such a lucky escape. 
But I m afraid you will have to be a wit 
ness. Still, your troubles are over, I hope." 

"I ll see Peggy home, Inspector," said 
Jimmy eagerly, and the good man smiled 
as the young people went out together. 

"Peggy, how can I tell you how glad I 
am that things have turned out all right," 
said Jimmy, as they reached the street. 
"How thankful, too, that you are free. 
Free to really care for someone to get 
married if you want to." 

"I may care for someone; I may even 
get married someday." Peggy s blushes 
and eloquent eyes told Jimmy many things 
he wanted to know. "But never again do 
I wish to be married at Gretna Green." 



School for Brides. 

Most girls marry, well at least four out of 
every five, and that means a home (if they 
can find one) and the care of a home. We all 
know it and often we do nothing about it. 
It is surely commonsense to prepare for an 
activity in which we wish to take part. If 
we want to swim, we learn to swim in pre 
ference to being thrown into the water. How 
often it is that the bride knows very little 
about cooking, just tossed into a kitchen 
ette, and thus she starts, handicapped from 
the start. 

Realising this ignorance about cooking, 
a number of States in America have estab 
lished Brides Cooking Schools, in which 
girls about to marry may learn a deal about 
cooking. In other words, they are being 
taught what their mothers omitted to teach 
them. Many of the quarrels in early mar 
ried life are due to the fact that the young 
wife knows almost nothing about cooking, 
and then there follows disappointment, the 
spoiling of food, waste, and all round un 
pleasantness. 

At these schools, which are equipped in 
the same way as a small domestic kitchen, 
the girls are taught how to cook, how to 
economically purchase foodstuffs, and how 
to make a small income go further, at 
smaller cost, and yet provide appetising 
dishes. The tuition is largely individual, 
and no girl is passed from one section till 
she has mastered the previous one. A three 
months course at the brides schools has 
worked wonders, and the students have a 
good workable knowledge of cooking, and 
a feeling of confidence where previously 
there had been timidity and fear. 

Here is an opportunity for public-spirited 
bodies in Australia to do something i* the 
same direction. Local councils, Commtry 
Women s Associations, and Domestic- 
Economy Schools could all help in this mew 
departure. 



Australian Home Journal, September 1, 1949 




fyou canl loeair the, deansen. -rfiats ffl&* * 



Tired of trying for a spotless shine on your sink and bath? 
Then try Bon Ami. It cleans without grit. Leaves no dulling, 
dirt-catching scratches to make you scrub and scrub. And 
more Bon Ami polishes as it cleans. Saves extra work leaves 
a brilliant, lasting lustre. Millions of housewives the world 
over prefer Bon Ami. Try it yourself to-day. It s fast, easy, 
safe and safe for your hands, too! 



BON AMI 



1 hasnf scratched yef ! 




POWDER 
and CAKE 



Printed by John Sands Pty. Ltd., Druitt St., Sydney, and Published by James Russell, for the Proprietors, at the Australian Home 

I... i me. "ii i_.. __! ui_.. . Am Ana v .. c c..j__ 



Australian Home Journal, beptember, 1 V49 












FAMOUS 





iuc most pieasaui DrcuK in every school day is playtime and the school lunch. There s 

a tasty snack then to be enjoyed, so make that snack Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits. 

In buying for your children, be sure you get Arnott s. 

Thi-re is no Substitute /or Quality f 



4 4 



PRICES SOAR AND SO ARE WE 
US T R A L I A 



URNAL 

These 
Patterns 

Enclosed 



NOVEMBER 
1st, 
1949 



egistered at 
he G.P.O., 
ydney, for 
ransmission 
y post as a 
iewspa^er. 



win 




114 



Australian Home Journal, November 1 1949 



*K V^= 



COLORADO (U.S.A.) ffLTA 
AA/PSAWA DOCTOR, 

M/SS//VG TOOTH 

THUMB/ 



YW& 

MOUTH. WH/TE/V 

YOVf TEETH. 



"> TEETH NEAR, 
A LAGOON 
TO MAKE 



KOLY/VOS 
YOU MO/Vy 



TOOTHPASTE 



HALF AN WCH 





ST0PP& FMS3& . 



Stop it faster with ANACIN! Aiiacin contains 

an extra ingredient. It is a prescription for 

pain and aches. 



|^ Beglitered 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




World famous baritone 



Jean Kent, star of the coming Two 
Cities production, "Sleeping Car to 
Trieste" poses in the housecoat she 
wears in the film. It has marked charm 
and distinction, designed in cherry- 
cream wool delaine, with a slim bodice 
and wide sleeves, full-skirted for grace 
ful movement, embroidered on the 
double-rolled revers, cuffs and sash- 
ends in chunky white cord-stitch. It is 
simple, clever and colourful. 



Scrawny Hands. 

Very thin, scrawny hands should be 
gently massaged every day with a fatten 
ing cream; and the use of a tissue tightener 
every other night might help to tighten 
loose, wrinkled skin. There is one thing 
that will help to disguise the wrinkled 
effect of loose skin over the knuckles and 
that is the use of vanishing cream for fin 
ishing the hands before an evening engage 
ment. It takes away that dry, shiny 
appearance of such skin and leaves a 
velvety softness that is most flattering. It 
is far better for such a skin condition than 
the finishing lotions, for the liquid powder 
is likely to settle in the network of fine 
lines and accentuate them. The latter, 
however, is excellent for very young or 
plump hands as well as for the shoulders, 
neck, and arms. 

+-++ 

There is more news of James Mason. He 
is to co-star with Joan Bennett in Walter 
Wanger s production of "The Blank Wall," 
screen adaptation of the novel of crime 
and punishment by Elizabeth Sanxay Hold 
ing. 




says: 



"Horiicks and I are old friends. 

I ve found it the most nourishing of all 

food drinks. 11 



Peter Dawson and Horiicks are 
life-long friends. Peter says: 
"Wherever I go in the British Em 
pire I enjoy my Horiicks. I find 
it helps to keep me going in top 
form. And, believe me, a concert 
artist needs to be fit all the 
time." 

Just like Peter Dawson, you ll 
enjoy the delicious, distinctive 
flavour of Horiicks. And, like 
Peter, you ll find that Horiicks 
will give you extra energy. 
The full, satisfying flavour of 
Horiicks comes from a careful 



blend of fresh, full-cream milk 
and the nutritive extracts of 
malted barley and wheat. It is 
Nature s flavour . . . that s why 
you never tire of it. 

Many people drink Horiicks 
simply because they enjoy that 
distinctive flavour. Others drink 
Horiicks because they need it to 
build them up ... to nourish the 
body and nerves . . . and to induce 
deep, refreshing sleep. But 
whatever the reason -- everyone 
enjoys Horiicks. It is equally 
delicious hot or cold. 



Rich in these food values 




when m/jred en directed 



Ask your storekeeper for 

HORLICKS 

the delicious, 
NOURISHING food drink 

8-oz.tin 2 f 2 16-oz.tin 3 S 

Men tlightlf higher in country areot 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 





*fo 




All leading furniture manufac 
turers are fitting Vono Spring 
Bases to their beds. Or you 
can buy a separate Vono Spring 
Base, put it on your present 
bed, and greatly increase your 
sleeping comfort. At all lead 
ing stores. 



Note this drawing of the Vono Spring Base. Support 
ing cross bars take care of the heavy part of the body 
but are not used under the head or feet, where little 
weight has to be supported. A feeling of resting on 
air results. Any mattress can be used on a Vono 
Spring Base but greatest comfort comes with a Vono 
Inner Spring mattress made m England. 

Buy the bed fitted with the 

VONO 

SPRING BASE 

There is a Vono Spring Base for all standard size beds. 
Don t buy imitations. Look for the name Vono. 

Made in England. 

Sole Australian Agents: Bunge (Aust.) Pty. Ltd., 
Sydney, Melbourne. Brtsbane. Adelaide, Perth. \ 



To Correspondents 

[The columns of this department for the answers to 
correspondents are designed to prove of genuine help and 
benefit to readers who desire information concerning 
matters of dress, housekeeping, etiquette, the toilet, or 
hygiene. In addition to the proper signature (which will 
never, be published under any circumstances), corre 
spondents are requested to send a pen-name, to which 
ike answer may be addressed.} 

FAINTING. Sorry to hear your sister is 
subject to fainting fits. When one comes 
on make no attempt to hold her up; but 
lay her flat on the back with the head as 
low as the feet. Give her an abundance of 
fresh air. Loosen all the clothing about 
the neck and waist. Gently sprinkle the 
face with cold water. After consciousness 
returns, a cup of coffee is far better than 
any kind of alcoholic drink to give the 
patient temporary strength. Annie G. 

POTATO SOUP. Here is the old-time 
recipe you are asking for: Two cupsful 
mashed potatoes, 1 quart economical stock, 
1 small carrot grated, 1 white turnip, 1 
onion, 2 or 3 stalks of celery, 2 teaspoons- 
ful sago, \ pint milk, pepper and salt to 
taste. Boil the stock, add vegetables cut 
in dice, grated carrot and sago, and sim 
mer till tender; pass the potatoes through 
a sieve; add them with the milk and 
minced parsley, simmer 10 minutes and 
serve. The soup should be of the consist 
ency of cream; if too thick, add more milk. 
L.L.H. 

GREGORY IX was born in Campania. He 
had contacts with the Emperor Barbarossa, 
whom he excommunicated on two occasions. 
He was a personal friend of St. Francis of 
Assisi, whom he canonised. He died in 
1241 at a very advanced age. H.M. 

INVALID GRUEL. Mix a tablespoonful of 
medium Scotch oatmeal with 2 tablespoons- 
ful of cold water, then pour on one of boil 
ing water gradually while stirring. Set all 
ina small saucepan, bring to the boil, and 
let it simmer for f of an hour, or till it is 
a smooth jelly. Strain into a basin, sweeten 
and flavour to taste. Teletype. 

FRUIT SCONES. f Ib. flour, pinch of salt, 
1 teaspoonful cream of tartar, J teaspoon- 
ful of soda, 1 oz. lard, 1 oz. margarine, 2 
ozs. granulated sugar, 3 ozs. currants, milk 
or milk-and-water to mix (about \\ gills). 
Wash and dry the currants, mix the flour 
with the salt, cream of tartar, and soda, 
and sieve them into a basin. Hub in the 
lard and margarine until mixture is like 
fine crumbs. Next add sugar and currants, 
an.d mix all dry ingredients together. Pour 
in the milk and mix to a stiff paste. Roll 
out on a pastry board until it is about \ 
inch thick, cut into triangles, and bake on 
a greased baking-sheet from 15 to 20 min 
utes in a hot oven. Mrs. B. 

PEANUT BUTTER MACAROONS. 2 egg 
whites, \ cupful sugar, \ teasponful almond 
extract, $ cupful peanut butter, 2 cupsful 
oven-popped rice cereal. Beat egg whites 
until stiff but not dry. Fold in sugar, 
flavouring and peanut butter. Add rice 
cereal, stirring only enough to combine. 
Drop from teaspoon onto well-greased bak 
ing sheet; bake in moderate oven (375 
deg. F.) about 20 minutes. Yield: \\ 
dozen macaroons (2 inches in diameter). 
Elsa. 

MACARONI PUDDING. Break 4 ozs. of 
macaroni into inch lengths, and boil in a 
quart of water in an uncovered saucepan 
for 15 minutes. Drain, and boil again with 
a pint of milk and 2 ozs. of sugar till 
tender but unbroken. When cool add 2 
beaten eggs, and flavour pleasantly. Put 
the mixture into a buttered dish, and bake 
till brown. For a superior pudding, take 
additional eggs and stir in a glass of noyau 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



or a little brandy. A little orange marma- 
late or apricot jam may, if liked, be put in 
the dish under the macaroni. Mrs. W. W. 

QUOTATION. "The inaudible and noise 
less foot of time" is from "All s well that 
ends well." Juvenal, the Eoman satirical 
poet, many hundreds of years before 
Shakespeare, put it this way: "The noise 
less foot of time steals swiftly by, and 
ere we dream of manhood, age is nigh!" 
Miss G. B. 

GINGEB, PRESERVED. "Having on hand a 
quantity of green ginger I would be pleased 
if you could tell me a method of making 
this ginger into preserved ginger." Mrs. 

I. M. This is made by boiling the ginger 

in syrup when green. It is a favourite 
dish for dessert, and should be bright and 
clear. If dark and stringy, it is not good. 

SMALL WEDDING. "I am to have a small 
wedding at home. Must it be informal 
that is, must my dress be street- or floor- 
length with no train? A number of my 
friends tell me that. I must be married in 
church if I want to wear bridal white." 

D.S. Your friends are mistaken. Even 

with only the immediate families and very 
close friends present, it is still the pre 
rogative of the bride to wear a bridal gown 
with all the trimmings. 

IRISH BREAD. 1 Ib. self-raising flour, 14 
ozs. wholemeal, 2 ozs. rolled or medium 
oats, 2 teaspoonsful bi-carbonate soda, 1 
level teaspoonful cream of tartar, 2 tea- 
spoonsful salt, ^ pint whey or sour milk. 
Turn oven on full. Sieve dry ingredients. 
Mix well together, then add liquid and stir 
quickly with a knife. Gather together fnto 
a lump and knead slightly, flour well and 
either cut in halves or shape into a long 
roll and place on floured baking sheet. 
Bake for 45 minutes in a hot oven. 
(Eegulo 6.) Mrs. S. S. 

BUFFET SERVICE. "I should like to have 
something unusual for buffet service at my 
wedding reception. It seems to me that 
the same things are served at every wed 
ding I attend. What do you suggest? I am 
not planning an elaborate menu." Maisie. 
One very good reason for the uniform 
ity of wedding menus in addition to 
scarcities is the number of varied tastes 
to be satisfied. For this reason old friends 
such as chicken a la king and lobster New- 
burg, chicken or lobster salad, or at times 
whole turkeys and roast Virginia ham with 
salad are encountered most often. They 
please everyone. A combination of oysters, 
prawns and lobster in Newburg sauce is 
excellent, or a combination of sea foods au 
gratin may be added for variety. Excellent 
food will always make up for a not-too- 
original menu. A very good dish for buffet 
service is creamed chicken hash in pan 
cakes, but it means first-rate catering if it 
is to be perfect when served. 



AUSTRALIAN HOME JOURNAL 
BABY BOOK No. 5 

All that is latest and best in Knitting and 
Crochet for Baby, clearly illustrated with 
instructions set out in the simplest way poss 
ible. It consists of: Pram Suit for the Baby 
Girl; Knitted Shell Set; Pram Cover; Roseleaf 
Layette; Mauryeen Crochet Set; Coat and 
Bonnet, Bubble Stitch; The Berry and Leaf 
Set; Alice Baby Set; Pamela Outfit; The 
Graham Suit; Baby s Shawl; Jessica Coat and 
Bonnet; Billie-Boy Outdoor Suit. Price 1/3 
(by Postal Note) to Australian Home Journal, 
407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. [Knitting 
Books 1, 2, 3, 4 sold out.] 



Matching cotton 
on every card! 




Always Matches 

Never Clashes 




OPAL-CLO BUTTON 



I - 



per card, in all 
popular colours 



Each colour beautifully iri 
descent . . . matching perfectly 
lighter or darker shades. 

Other Beutron Buttons in a 
range of 22 colours to match 
every shade of material. 



They boil. They dry clean. 
Hot irons can t hurt them. 
BEUTRON CARDIGAN 
BUTTONS. With special 
backing disc to hold button 
securely are obtainable 
everywhere. 



A Product of G. Herring (Aust.) Pty. Ltd., Sydney. 




Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



L49/3 



MORE and MORE 
MOTHERS 

choose this laxative 

for their children & themselves 




Gentle, Effective, Safe, Reliable 

LAXETTES contain phenolphthalein, which is non-habit forming 
and is one of the safest and most reliable laxative substances 
known to medical science. This is incorporated in the finest 
block chocolate by an exclusive, scientific process which 
ensures accurate dosage and strict conformity to British 
Pharmacopoeia standards. 



SAMPLE 

COUPON 

SEND2^d _ 

stamp to cover 

postage and . AMI IJ49 

packing ... to Laxette Mfg. Co., 366 Swanston Street, Melbourne 



( BLOCK 
>{ LETTERS 
I PLEASE 



Heart to Heart 



Drunken Husbands: 

From "Social Worker": "I read a letter 
in your heart to heart page by Grand 
mother , in which she mentioned about mar 
riages being wrecked by dominating wives. 
I agree with every word she says, but I 
think more marriages are failures because 
of selfish, inconsiderate husbands. As a 
social worker I visit many homes and can 
assure you, in the great majority of cases, 
the trouble can be laid at the door of the 
husband. Here is one case that is typical 
of many. The couple have three children, 
and although the husband is earning good 
money he does not allow the wife sufficient 
cash to run the home, but expects the 
best for his meals; and not that alone, but 
if he brings home a friend or friends with 
whom he has been drinking they must also 
be served with a meal. He is a heavy 
drinker, and when he comes home drunk is 
very abusive, and the children have to 
slink off to bed. 

Expects Service: 

"He expects service of every kind, his 
shirts and collars to be always laundered, 
his clothes mended and pressed, no missing 
buttons, no holes in his socks. Leaving 
aside his drinking habits, no woman with 
three young children can carry out the 
duties imposed en her, and in this case if 
it were not for the young wife s two sisters 
giving her a helping hand, very often she 
could not manage at all. Yet the drunk, 
swaggering husband thinks he is badly 
done by if everything is not always in 
apple-pie order. It is beyond me why re 
spectable, well educated, and well brought- 
up girls marry beer-soakers of this kind. 

Drudgery: 

"The life of the wife is one long series 
of drudgeries, few or no pleasures, seldom 
going to even a picture show, to bed late 
and up early. Nothing in life for these 
young women. Personally I would put 
these drunken swines of husbands in a 
penitentiary, provide work for them there, 
and send their wages to their wives. When 
they gave evidence of sincere reform I 
would release them for work at their own 
jobs; but with this hanging over them, if 
you transgress again, the cooler is wait 
ing 7 ." This letter from "Social Worker" 

is unfortunately a true picture of many 
homes. These married men are regular 
attendants at the 6 o clock pig troughs 
where they swill beer they can ill-afford to 
pay for, and the wives and children have 
to go short in order that they may imbibe 
this tanglefoot. The remedy suggested is 
drastic and if it could be enforced would 
be effective. Habitual drunkenness is a 
ground for divorce, but thousands of 
women and children suffer in silence rather 
than face legal publicity. The churches of 
every denomination should show a strong 
front against excessive drinking, and dif 
ferent organisations that have the good of 
the community at heart could join in. Also 
the police could warn publicans that their 
houses are under observation, and the 
supplying of liquor to already drunken 
men will be duly noted when their licence 
comes up for renewal. 

Going to Dances: 

"I am fond of dancing, and my husband, 
who used to dance before we were married, 
does not go dancing at all. He says he 
does not mind me going to dances with his 
brother Bill. Bill and I have been to 
several dances, but I don t like the idea at 
all, as it places me in an invidious posi- 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



Hon. Bill is a bachelor and very good- 
looking, and I know people are already 
talking. Have you any advice? I don t 
want my marriage to go on the rocks." 

Minnie. Even if your husband does not 

like dancing now, he should go with you 
occasionally, and not make it necessary 
for you to go unescorted or with his 
brother. In any case, I would stop going 
with his brother. If hubby goes with you, 
even if he does not dance but talks to 
other folks, he is doing something to bring 
you happiness and enjoyment. If he 
wanted you to go to a football match, al 
though you may not know much about it, 
I am sure you would go, just as many other 
wives go. Much trouble is often caused by 
the fact that one party likes dancing and 
the other does not. It is such a small mat 
ter to cause disturbance in a marriage, 
when a little give and take can solve the 
problem. 

The Casual One: 

"I was almost on the point of being 
engaged to a boy who is clever and hard 
working and very likeable. One thing 
holds me back he is always late for 
appointments, and thinks nothing of it at 
all. He has kept me waiting for him on 
many occasions. The other night we were 
going to a concert, and had to be there by 
8 o clock. It was a very dressy affair, and 
I was all ready in a long frock by half- 
past seven, the time arranged for him to 
call. He did not arrive till nearly 8.30, 
and when I made complaint he said we 
would be in plenty of time for the second 
half! We did not go at all and he seemed 
quite oblivious to my disappointment. We 
have not seen each other since." Nellie. 

If I were in your place I would give 

him his conge. A man who is so stupid 
and irresponsible would make an indiffer 
ent kind of husband, and your nerves 
would be worn to a frazzle by his complete 
lack of consideration for you in attempting 
to run a household on any kind of schedule. 
Behind all this casualness is a selt-centred 
selfishness. Let him have all that to him 
self. 

The Burden-bearer: 

"The whole of my life I have worked for 
my people, an invalid father who is very 
demanding and exacting, a mother who is 
weak and daren t cross father in any way. 
I also have a sister who is a great sufferer 
and not able to work much. There are two 
brothers who are married, and have their 
own troubles and family upkeep and do 
nothing to support the home. I have been 
the burden-bearer, earning good money, all 
going to support the family, and nothing 
left for myself. At 40 I have met a man, 
a widower, with no family and in excellent 
financial circumstances, who wants to 
marry me and make me happy. He has 
also offered to allocate 100 a year to 
help the family. He wants, as he says, to 
take m-j away from it all, as I have sacri 
ficed myself far too long. I am wondering if 
at 40 I could make a satisfactory wife " 
By all means seize with both hands this 
chance of happiness and comfort and free 
dom from worry. Forty is not old these 
days, so don t worry about that. Your 
family should get along very well under 
this arrangement. 



Wife: "Henry, what does this note mean 
that I found in your pocket? It savs: 
Mary Ellen 3.30 ." 

Husband: "Oh, nothing. Only the name 
of a horse in the 3.30 race." 

When the husband returned in the even 
ing, the wife said: "Oh, darling, your 
horse rang you up." 



HER RHEUMATISM GOES AS SHE LOSES UGLY FAT 

Great London Hospital endorses famous Youth-0-Form 

"For many years," says Mrs. Fitzpatrick, "I have been crippled with rheumatism, 
until some friends recommended me to take Youth-O-Form to reduce my weight. 
I DID REDUCE and, more marvellous still, my rheumatism completely disappeared. 
That was four years ago. The London winter I find very severe, and this year I 
got rheumatism badly again, and all the prescriptions were useless. I told my doctor, 
who is leading physician at one of the big hospitals here, that Youth-O-Form was 
the only thing that ever did me any good, and he advised me to try it again, and 
that the Youth-O-Form prescription was 
well known. Once again I am quite well 
and lit." 

If you are overweight and 
suffer from Rheumatism, 
Indigestion, Constipation, 
or constant headaches, 
Youth-O-Form will help 
you, too. 



Mrs. Darley, pictured below, ts only 
one of countless Australian women 
who have regained health and appear 
ance through Youth-O-Form. 



WHAT YOU SHOULD WEIGH 


Height 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-40 


ft. in. 


st. Ib. 


St. Ib. 


st. Ib. 


si. Ib* 


St. ]. 


4 11 


7 5 


7 8 


7 11 


8 


8 3 


5 


7 7 


7 10 


7 13 


8 2 


8 5 


5 1 


7 9 


7 12 


8 1 


8 4 


8 7 


5 2 


7 12 


8 1 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


5 3 


8 1 


8 4 


8 6 


8 9 


8 13 


5 4 


8 4 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


5 5 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


9 7 


5 6 


8 11 


9 


9 3 


9 7 


9 11 


5 7 


9 1 


9 4 


9 7 


9 11 


10 1 


5 8 


9 5 


9 8 


9 11 


10 1 


10 5 


Add 31b. for every five years ever 


forty. 




outh-O-Form is pleasant, effectiYe, per- 
lanent and easy to take, 
ou can get the six weeks Youth-O-Form 
Treatment for 20/- (or a 10-day 
Carton, 5/6) from your nearest 
Chemist. 

If far from a Chemist, pin 
a Postal Note to a piece of 
paper with your name and 
address: send it to British 
Medical Laboratories 
Box 4155, G.P.O., Syd 
ney, and your Youth-O- 
Form will reach 
you by return mail 
plainly wrapped 
and with full 
directions for 
use. 




The Doctor Answers 

Patient: "But why should I have Rheumatism, Doctor?" 

Doctor: "Well, Rheumatism can be caused by two things: 
an injury to a joint or muscle or by an accumulation 
of poisons in the blood stream which is a condition 
we call toxaemia. Thousands of people like yourself, 
in the last few years, have overworked and neg 
lected their health, letting poisons collect in the 
blood stream so that the ranks of sufferers from 
Rheumatism have increased enormously." 

Patient: "But, Doctor, how do these poisons accumulate?" 

Doctor: "Your blood is constantly flowing through your 
kidneys to be purified from uric acid and other 
poisons. If your kidneys fail to do this, these poisons circulate back through 
your body and collect in the muscles and joints, causing the aches and 
pains that most people call Rheumatism." 

Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids help drive out the crippling poisons from your blood 
stream that are the cause of Rheumatic aches and pains; your kidneys are cleansed 
and strengthened and you get a new feeling of good health and energy. 

If you suffer from Rheumatic pains, backache, sciatica, lumbago, kidney and bladder 
weaknesses, neuritis, gout, etc., start a course of Menthoids right away. 

Get a month s treatment flask of Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids for 6/6 with Diet Chart, 
or a 12-day flask for 3/6, from your nearest chemist or store, or a postal note to 
British Medical Laboratories, Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney, will bring you Menthoids 
by return mail. 

1161 

MENTHOIDS FOR RHEUMATISM 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 





Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



Materials: 6 ozs. Buttercup 3-ply wool; 

1 set each of No. 9 and No. 10 knitting 
needles with points at both ends; 4 buttons 
aud a crochet hook. 

Tension: Approximately 8 sts. to 1 inch 
in width, and 17 rows to 2 inches in depth, 
measured over ribbed section worked on 
No. 9 needles. 

Measurements: Bust size, 33-36 inches; 
length from back neck to lower edge, 21 
inches; sleeve down underarm, 4f inches. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st(s)., 
:stiteh(es) ; in(s)., inch(es); pat., pattern; 
tog., together; inc., increase (by knitting 
twice into same st.); rep., repeat; d.c., 
double crochet. 
The Front and Back (both sections alike). 

Using two No. 10 needles cast on 90 sts. 
and work 1 row into the back of these 
cast-on sts. Now work in pat., thus: 

1st pat. row * P. 4, k. 5; rep. from * to 
end. 

2nd pat. row * P. 5, k. 4; rep. from * 
to end. 

3rd pat. row * P. 4, slip 1, k. 4, then 
pass the slipped st. over these 4 sts.; rep. 
from * to end. 

4th pat. row * P. 2, make 1 by putting 
wool over needle, p. 2, k. 4; 
rep. from * to end. 

These 4 rows form the pat. 
Proceed until the- 8th pat. has 
been completed, then change 
to two No. 9 needles and, tak 
ing care to keep the continuity, 
of pat., inc. 1 st. at both ends 
of needle on the next row and 
every following 4th row until 
Bts. number 134. Continue 
without further shaping until 
work measures 14 inches from 
cast-on edge, ending on a 4th 
pat. row. 

Shape the armholes by cast 
ing off 15 sts. at start of next 

2 rows, then take 2 tog. at 
start of next 14 rows. Leave 
the remaining 90 sts. on st.- 
holder for time being. 

The Sleeves (two alike). 

Using two No. 10 needles cast 
oa 90 sts. and work 1 row into 
the back of these cast-on sts., 
then work in pat. as given ft>r 
main part. When the 2nd pat. 
has been completed, change to 
two No. 9 needles and, taking 
care to keep the continuity of 
the pat., inc. 1 st. at both ends 
of needles on the next row and 
every following 4th row until 
ats. number 102. Proceed in 
pat. without further shaping 
until work measures 4f inches 
from cast-on edge, ending on 
a 4th pat. row. 

Shape the top by casting off 
8 sts. at start of next 2 rows, 
then take 2 tog. at start of 
next 14 rows. (72 sts.). 
The Yoke. 

First take the back section of main part 
and with right side of work facing slip 
the last 45 sts. on to a No. 9 needle to 
form the left side of back, then on to the 
same needle slip 61 sts. of one sleeve; now, 
on to another No. 9 needle slip the remain 
ing 11 sts. of sleeve, the 90 sts. of front 
section and 11 sts. of 2nd sleeve, then with 
a 3rd No. 9 needle slip the remaining 61 



sleeve sts., and the 45 sts. remaining on^ 
back section. 

Join on wool to inner end of back section 
and, starting at left side of back, cast on 
4 sts. 

Next row (1st pat. row) K. 4, pat. to 
end; turn, and cast on 4. (332 sts.). 




Next 11 rows K. 4, pat. to within 4 sts. 
of end, k. 4. 

Now shape work thus: 

Next row K. 4, * p. 1, p . 2 tog., p. 1, 
k. 5; rep. from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row** K. 4, * p. 5, k. 3; rep. from 
* to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 3, slip 1, k. 4, then 
pass slipped st. over; rep. from * to 4 sts. 
of end, k. 4. 



Next row K. 4, * p. 2, make 1, p. 2, k. 
3; rep. from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 3, k. 5; rep. from * 
to 4 sts. of end, k. 4.** 
Eep. from ** to ** once. 
Next row K. 4, * p. 5, k. 3; rep. from * 
to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 3, slip 1, k. 4, pass 
slipped st. over; rep. from * to 4 sts. of 
end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 2, make 1, p. 2, 
k. 3; rep. from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 2 tog., p. 1, k. 5; 
rep. from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 5, k. 2; rep. from * 
to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 2, slip 1, k. 4, pass 
slipped st. over; rep. from * to 4 sts. of 
end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 2, make 1, p. 2, k_ 
2; rep. from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p, 2, k. 5; rep. from * 
to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 5, k. 2; rep. from * 
to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 2, slip 1, k. 4, pass 
slipped st. over; rep. from * to 4 sts. of 
end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 4, * p. 2, make 1, p. 2, k. 
2; rep. from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 
Change to No. 10 needles. 
Next row K. 4, * p. 2 tog., k. 5; rep. 
from * to 4 sts. of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 
4, p. 5, k. 1; 
rep. from * to 4 
sts. of end, k. 4. 
Next row K. 
4, p. 1, slip 1, 
k. 4, pass slipped 
at. over; rep. 
from * to 4 sts. 
of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 
4, * p. 2, make 1, 
p. 2, k. 1; rep. 
from * to 4 sts. 
of end, k. 4. 

Next row K. 
4, * p. 1, k. 5; 
rep. from * to 4 
sts. of end, k. 4. 
Next row K. 
4, * p. 5, k. 1; 
rep. from * to 4 
sts. of end, k. 4. 
Next row K. 
4, * p. 1, slip 1, 
k. 4, pass slipped 
st. over; rep. 
from * to 4 sts. 
of end, k. 4. 

Next row E. 
4, * k. 2 tog.; 
rep. from * to 4 1 
sts. of end, k. 4. 
(98 sts.). 

Knit 5 rows in 
garter-st. (every 
row k.). Cast off. 
To Make Up. 
Join the sleeve 
and side seams, 
then sew lower 
part of sleeve into armhole. Turn under 
and catch down the k. 4 border on right 
back edge, then catch down the cast-on 
edge of border on left back edge. Sew 
buttons to left back edge, then work 4 
crochet loops on right edge to form bnt- 
tonlioles. Lightly press work. 

*-" 

The more we watch man s efforts to 
straighten out the affairs of the world, the 
more we believe in prayer. 



10 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



THE NEW CHIEF 

By MARGARET DALE. 

If you don t like someone who doesn t like you,, perhaps there is a more exciting reason 
than you have guessed for that mutual antipathy. 



Sally knew her voice sounded unusually 
urgent as she said: "Pat so sorry, but I 
can t make it. I can t lunch with you to 
day. It s impossible." 

She could guess that Pat, hearing that 
note in her voice, would wonder what was 
the matter, but she could not help that, 
and she could not ex 
plain. Pat was a dear. 
She had known her 
since they were at 
school together, but the 
very last thing she 
could cope with was 
Pat s merry, "newly 
engaged" complacency. 

"Another day, Pat. 


She expected that in 
her office half a mile 
away Pat would be 
piqued with her; she 
had not expected there 
would be disapproval at 
this end also, and she 
jumped nervously as a voice 
said stonily somewhere 
above her head: 

"There is that address, 
Miss Mallard. I m going 
out to lunch now." 

"Oh, thank you, Mr. 
Albany," Sally said faintly, 
grasping the telephone for 
comfort, wondering why he 
had to sound so unfriendly, 
and if Pat had heard it. If 
she had, perhaps it would 
convey something to her. 

Sure enough, Pat had 
caught the brief inter 
change, and she asked 
interestedly: "Was that the 
new chief, Sally t" 
"Yes," said Sally, adding 

as the office door closed 
sharply, "He s hateful." 
She had never meant 

anything more sincerely, 

but the telephone did not 

convey that to her friend : 

Patricia, whose voice came 

back promptly, cheerful 

and superior: 

"Oh, they all are at first, 

darling. You ll soon tame 

him. What? Never? Non 
sense!" she went on firmly. 
It was a wonderful world 

to Pat, full of wonderful 

people. She was sure all 

troubles were imaginary as she 

added: "We ll make it Thurs 
day, then, Sally. The usual 

time and place and no excuses. 

because I m dying to show you 

the cameo Roland s aunt sent 

me." 

"All right," said Sally, who 

was only dying to ring off and 

get away. She wanted to be 

somewhere where she need not 

speak to anyone, even a friend, 

and she plunged- out of the 

office and down the stairs in the wake of 

Mr. Albany, but with an expression on her 

face quite unlike his. 



He had looked (as usual) grim as gran 
ite. Sally s tanned, fair face under the 
tawny wave of hair on her brow was un 
usually downcast as she turned her back 



on the right-hand direction where lay 
streets, shops, restaurants and people. 
She struck sharply to the left where there 
was a common, where she could sit on a 
bench by the river and stare dispiritedly 
at the swans and their cygnets, marvelling 
miserably all over again at the way her 
pleasant daily life had suddenly clashed 
into discord. 

She had been happy enough at Bristow s 
till Mr. Albany came there. 

She had been happy enough working for 
dear old Mr. Morgan-Freehold, who was 
kind and liked her and the way she did 
things. 

"And not only M.F.," she told 
herself for the hundredth time. 
"Other people, too. It isn t as if I 
am a beginner. I m twenty-five; I 
know what I m about. At least I 
did know, till he came, but now 
for the past fortnight . . ." 
Her eyes, which were as grey 
and clear and bright beneath 
their thick, tangled lashea 
as the water she was watch 
ing but not seeing, pictured 
instead a dozen little scenes 
of disapproval and un 
friendliness. 

There had been the day 
Mr. Albany first came and 




"There is that address, 
Miss Mallard. I mm 
going out to lunch now." 



his tall figure dwarfed tubby Mr. 
Bristow s in the doorway; Mr. 
Bristow had smiled as he said: 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



11 



"This is Miss Sally Mallard, who ll look 
after you. 1 

But from that very first second Mr. 
Albany s bleak smile had daunted her. Old 
Mr. Morgan-Freehold had called her Sally 
from the beginning and let her look after 
him. Mr. Albany had kept her at an 
immense and icy distance from the moment 
he occupied M.-F s. familiar chair. 

The next day he had asked her, with 
judicial displeasure: "Does your machine 
need overhauling, Miss Mallard, or are you 
a poor typist?" The day after . . . but Sally 
couldn t bear to remember all the inci 
dents; they were too much for her. She 
had laughed at first, prepared to take it 
all as part of the inevitable breaking-in 
process, but after ten days of it there was 
no laughter left. 

She was unnerved, there was no doubt 
of it. She tried to tell herself that it 
didn t matter, but she knew it did matter 
to her. She was jumpy and miserable 
as if a spell had been laid on her. 

She had reached the stage when even to 
lunch with Pat and listen to her chatter 
was too much for her. She could not bear 
it. Pat would ask questions, demand 
descriptions; it was better to get away by 
herself and sit gazing at the proud swans. 

She could have sat gazing a good deal 
longer if she hadn t awakened from her 
reverie to a sudden panic that she was 
going to be late and start the afternoon 

badly. 

* * * 

She hurried. She almost ran back to 
Bristow s, but she was late, a bare ten 
minutes that M.F. wouldn t even have 
noticed- 

But the minute she opened her office 
door the buzzer sounded from the inner 
room, and she knew that the afternoon had 
started badly. This meant that once again 
she would have to put off mentioning that 
she wanted to leave early on Wednesday. 
And to-day was Tuesday! 

She put down her bag at once and 
hurried into Mr. Albany s room, her cheeks 
flushed from the run, her neat little skull 
cap perched above the line of her lovely 
hair. 

Mr. Albany, remote and glacial behind 
his desk^ glanced at it meaningly. He did 
not see the charm of her hair. He merely 
asked frostily: 

"Do you usually work in your hat, Miss 
Mallard?" 

That fetched Sally: she might be wor 
ried and flurried at present, but she was 
not timid by nature, and there was a sud 
den answering curtness in her own tone as 
she said: 

"Sometimes. You wanted me, Mr. 
Albany?" 

She stood very erect and stiff, waiting 
to ward off the next comment, but possibly 
Mr. Albany was not in a mood for battle, 
for he left the subject abruptly and out 
lined the job he wanted done. 

When she was in her own little office 
with the Tuesday on her tear-off calendar 
facing her like a challenge, Sally s courage 
cooled off somewhat. 

She wished she had been mollifying in 
stead of hasty; she wished even more that 
she hadn t sat so long by the river. It had 
been an idiotic thing to do when she had 
wanted this afternoon to go so smoothly. 
But she had put paid to that, she realised, 
still defiantly wearing her cap but feeling 
far from happy. She tried to concentrate, 
but the thought of Wednesday kept com 
ing back, and it did not help to remember 
how different, how very different it had 
been a fortnight ago. 



So easy, then, to say to M.-F., "It s my 
hospital Wednesday," so that they could 
arrange the work accordingly, fixing it so 
that she could go off at four o clock with 
a clear conscience, and in plenty of time 
to catch the four-fifteen bus to Steeple- 
Burden. M.-F. had just said pleasantly, 
"Eemember me to Bill, Sally," and thought 
no more about it. But M.-F. was kind and 
human, whereas Mr. Albany . . . she could 
imagine how Mr. Albany s granite face 
would become even harder when (and if) 
she asked to go off early. 

"And there is no if I must go," thought 
Sally, for, however much she disliked it 
and put it off, she never really contem 
plated shirking that issue. There was no 
question of letting Bill down, either for 
his own sake or for Norma s. Both Bill 
and Norma had been too good to her 
when she was unhappy for her ever to 
think of that now. 

It was Bill who had written to her so 
understandingly when her fiance, John, 
was killed. Bill had been his friend. It 
was Norma, her first friend when she joined 
the A.T.S., who had taken forty-eight 
hours leave and travelled half across 
England to comfort her. And now all that 
was in the past and no more than a sting 
to catch her by the throat at rare inter 
vals, it was her turn to help them. To go 
out every other Wednesday to spend the 
evening with poor, blinded Bill, because 
Norma was working in town and couldn t 
get down every week. 

Bill was cheerful and uncomplaining and 
divinely optimistic about the outcome of 
his next and final operation, but while he 
was waiting for it he needed all the en 
couraging companionship he could have. 

"I must go," thought Sally, wondering 
how in the world was she going to fix it, 
startled out of her preoccupation by the 
telephone ringing, startled again as a 
feminine voice inquired, "Bonnie?" 

"This is Mr. Albany s office," she began 
briefly. 

"That s right. I want to speak to Mr. 
Ronnie Albany. Is he in?" asked the 
voice, and Sally put the call through to 
the inner office, thinking jadedly, "So 
that s his name, Eonnie, is it? It sounds 
much too ordinary." 

She hated him so much that she had not 
even wondered Vrhat the "R" in his name 
stood for, or conjectured about his feminine 
friends. He was young enough for any 
girl to wonder what sort of girl he liked, 
but Sally hated him too much for that. 
Even now she only supposed that he some 
times found it worth while to be pleasant 
to someone, probably to suit some business 
end or ambition. 

Perhaps someone who seemed important 
to him was able to strike some pleasant 
ness out of him but if that feminine 
caller had done so, her influence was as 
brief as her call. The buzzer sounded 
again. Sally could see no sign of soften 
ing on his flint-like face, and the glance 
he directed at her cap, which she had for 
gotten, was venomous. 

"I can only suppose, Miss Mallard," he 
said coldly, "that at some time or other 
your boy-friend has told you it suits you." 
* * * 

Then it was Wednesday, and, with her 
request still unmade, Sally turned in very 
soberly in the morning, to find that for 
some unexplained reason a more cordial 
note was striking. 

She was quick to appreciate it, but with 
a certain sense of shame. It seemed silly 
and childish to let anyone develop such a 



hoodoo over her, and she scolded herself 
inwardly^ "It s so weak." 

But for all that she was glad for the 
rush of work and succession of visitors 
that kept Mr. Albanj fully occupied. 

"Ronnie ha!" she thought disbeliev- 
ingly. but towards the end of the morn 
ing she had a brief glimpse of what might 
pass for more Ronnie-ish qualities in that 
rock-like personage. He brought out some 
letters to her, and paused by her chair to 
say: 

"Miss Mallard, yesterday I made some 
remarks about your appearance. They were 
uncalled-for and I m sorry." 

His voice was still aloof, but at least, 
reflected Sally, he was trying to be decent, 
and that was something. He sounded like 
a prig, but a nice prig, if there can be 
such a thing. 

Her usual warm friendliness, which 
hatred had banked down so firmly, rose 
in quick response. She said hurriedly, 
"I d forgotten it," but she perceived for 
the first time that there was something 
companionable about the man. 

He might even be quite well disposed 
away from the office and among his own 
friends. 

The possibility made it easier for her to 
open the afternoon with a well. rehearsed: 

"Would it be possible for me to leave a 
little earlier this afternoon, Mr. Albany?" 

It sounded like one of his own office 
phrases, and Sally put it across neatly, her 
fingers well crossed, fortified by the knowl 
edge that she had been punctual, and that 
her cap hung on its proper place on a peg. 

But it was no use. Neither the phrase 
nor the exemplary behaviour got her any 
where. Iciness settled swiftly on Mr. 
Albany s face as he said: 

"This afternoon? Haven t you noticed 
we re very busy to-day, Miss Mallard?" 

"We were, this morning," Sally shot back 
hotly; she always meant to conduct her 
side of these monotonously regular ex 
changes with a beautiful restraint that 
should have made him feel boorish. But 
invariably she was so nettled that her sen 
tences jerked out incoherently, as now. 
"We ve broken the back of the work," she 
pointed out. "I could easily be finished by 
four." 

"By four? I thought you said a little 
early?" said Mr. Albany, such deadly in 
tent in his tone that Sally s face flushed 
scarlet. 

"It is important." 

"These things always are," said Mr. 
Albany sceptically, watching her from be 
hind his desk, and looking so unmoved 
and hateful that she knew it would be 
quite impossible to tell him why it was so 
important. 

Much he d care! Small chance that he 
would understand! 

And it was only the thought of Bill, so 
gallant and so dependent on the strength 
that Norma s love and Sally s friendship 
gave him it was only the thought of Bill 
expecting her so confidently that made 
her persist: 

"But I must Bill he . . ." 

"Your friend is not my concern," Mr. 
Albany interrupted her coldly, "and if 
you ve given him the idea that you can 
meet him at four I can only suggest that 
when you do see him you tell him differ 
ently."* 

"I didn t say I d meet him at four," poor 
Sally riposted, utterly dismayed at the 
way she had only to speak to this horrible 
person for things to get out of hand. "It s 
a question of the buses. The four-fifteen s 



\L 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



all right; you can get on that. But tilt- 
later ones are so crowded." 

Then she stopped abruptly, because it 
was obviously no u.se going on. He did 
not care. It was nothing to him, and he 
was quite incapable of putting himself in 
anyone else s place. .The certainty of that 
realisation gave her the dignity she had 
wished for before; she finished quietly: 

"However, that is that. What is there 
to do now, Mr. Albany?" 

"The report for Mr. Bristow," said Mr. 
Albany dismissingly. 

But lie may have been affected by her 
new dignity, for he said in a tone of con 
cession: 

"And if you ve cleared everything up 
by a quarter or ten to five, there s no 
objection to your going then. But f cm- 
o clock! Nonsense!" 

Sally said nothing. The situation was ; 
so completely beyond her that for the I 
present she could not even try to sort i 
it out, much less understand why behind 
her immediate concern for Bill there 
was a hollow, aching disillusionment 
that Mr. Albany could be so small- 
minded. 

* * * 

Sally was accompanied throughout 
the afternoon by a steely resolution not 
to leave a second before five. 

But, exactly at a 
quarter to, Mr. Al 
bany loomed beside 
her, seemingly tall as 
a lighthouse, seem 
ingly chilly as the 
green waters at a 
lighthouse s base. He 
said: 

"If you can 
ready in two 
minutes, Miss 
Mallard, 111 
run you out to 
Steeple - Bur 
den." 

Sally rose 
mechanically to 
her feet, star 
ing at him 
helplessly for a 
moment before 
she picked up 
her hat and 
bag. 

She was 
ready in two 
minutes. She 
walked out be 
side him as if 
she were in a 
dream. Only 
the constant 
thought of Bill wait 
ing for her consoled 
her for her own de 
plorable weakness. She 
would have given anything 
to say, "Thank you very 
much, I d rather not," but 
she couldn t. There was Bill . . . 

"You ll be there at the same time as if 
you d caught the bus," Mr. Albany told 
her decisively as they walked to where he 
parked his car. 

She contrived to say briefly: "Thank 
you. I didn t want to keep Billy waiting." 
"You won t," he said tersely. 
She glanced at him cautiously. He didn t 
look small-minded. 

His profile gave an impression of strength 
and humour; meeting him casually, she 
would have liked him. 



when they were at Bristow s he d have 



She could even wonder if he were differ- _ _ 

cut at home. She jumped guiltily as he S aul7 "Miss " Mallardf ^ ^ christened 

fr\f\ao ThOT rv\ f\ m n - r 4- ^ r> n Ir . -_-. - ._ ., __ . 

Ronald." But it was very little help to 



chose that moment to ask: 

"Miss Mallard, do you remember at what 
time my mother telephoned yesterday?" 

"Your mother how should I?*" she asked, 
and he said: 

"You took the call." 

"Ah it was she who 
called you 
Bonnie ?" Sally 
asked, recalling 
not so much the 
time as her 




"As long as we re together 

to talk . . . nothing else 

matters." 



own furious indignation of yesterday after 
noon; but Mr. Albany said quite mildly: 
"Of course she did. It s my nan:<v 
He sounded so human. Was it because 
they had left the office behind them? -Did 
he keep an entirely different personality 
for working hours? 

Certainly, if he had had for some un 
imaginable reason to tell her his name 



know he could be pleasant outside, since 
it was a quite different personality Sally 
had to cope with from nine to five 
daily, and she said sparsely: 
"It was the afternoon." 
"Thought so. But she would have 
it was the morn 
ing," he said, add 
ing, "And you know 
how impossible it is 
to argue with 
mothers. Anyhow, it 
is with mine," he 
told her. 

But Sally had no 
time to savour 
either the alto 
gether unprecedent 
ed, friendly con 
fidence in his voice, 
or his sudden gay 
smile. They were 
already running 
into Steeple-Burden, 
and the Convales 
cent Home was the 
first place one 
came to. 

They were 
driving under 
its walls and 
she did not 
want to over 
shoot the gates, 
so she inter 
rupted him 
swiftly: 

"Mr. Albany, 
here we are. 
There is the 
Home, to the 
left. Bill will 
be at the gates. 
Would you put 
me down 

there?" 

Without 
thinking, she 
^^^ put her hand 

on his arm to accen 
tuate her wtjrds, and 
perhaps he didn t like 
it. Perhaps he thought 
it forward, perhaps 
|* . . . and whatever he 
thought, the grin and 
the friendliness vanished 
like a gleam of winter s sun 
shine; his habitual hauteur 
reclaimed him as he said: 
"Oh, of course. Certainly." 
They were at the gates 
now, and Bill was waiting. 
Sally could see him through 
the scroll-work, tall and 
soldierly and stalwart just 
a little more soldierly and 
stalwart than he had ever 
bothered to look in the days 
when he was still an alto 
gether fit young man. Noth 
ing about Bill demanded 
pity and, since she never 
ec that without admiration, it 
chimed in her voice as she said, "There s 
Bill!" then, more soberly, "Thank you very 
much." 

"Not at all," said Mr. Albany. 

But, as if to counterbalance the warmth 

in hers, his voice was colder than she had 

ever heard it. and ho was off before she 

was through the gates, to be greeted by 



could 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



13 



Bill s interested: "You came by car thi* 
afternoon, Sally?" 

Bill had developed the blind man s sure- 
ness of hearing. He had not yet, Sally 
noted, developed that other compensatory 
perception vouchsafed to those whose sight 
is darkened. For when she had told him 
who had brought her, he said pleasantly, 
"A very decent type, I could tell that," 
and she knew well enough that for Bill 
the word "decent" covered a multitude of 
graces and generosities that Mr. Albany 
just did not possess. 

* * * 

"Mr. Albany, in my hurry 1 didn t thank 
you properly yesterday for giving me a 
lift, but I m really very grateful. I hate 
letting Bill down." 

"Of course." Mr. Albany s voice was as 
grave as his face, but less icy than Sally 
was accustomed to, and he even played 
with his pen for a second before saying in 
a sort of embarrassed burst she might have 
expected from herself but never from him: 

"I m afraid I didn t kno\v till after 
wards that the men at Steeple-Burden are 
blind." 

Sally was so convinced that her preju 
dice against him was unassailable that she 
did not recognise what the sympathy in 
his voice did to her. or the \Yarning nature 
of her own swift thought, "However much 
I detest him in the future, I ll always re 
member he could be decent Bill s word 
about another man s blindness." 

She said aloud, quietly: "Yes, but lots 
of them will recover their sight. They 
aren t hopeless cases. There s a very good 
chance for Bill. He s due for his final 
operation in a fortnight, and if it s suc 
cessful you can imagine how we hope it 
will be!" 



. i r. Aiii.Miiy watched her, and for one 
instant it looked as if he could not take 
his eyes from her face. The office seemed 
unnaturally quiet, as if the intensity of 
that hope held both of them in a spell. 
Yet, of course, it meant nothing to him: 
it was Mere conventional sympathy that 
made him say: 

"It must be ghastly for him the wait 
ing. And for you." 

"Yes. I do care what happens to Bill," 
said Sally, a little defensively. She had 
grown used to defending that loyal affec 
tion before the attacks of friends like 
Pat, who had shrugged shoulders over the 
sacrifice of even one evening a fortnight 
when one might be at a party, or dancing. 
Sweet of Sally, they said, but silly. And 
for all that Mr. Albany seemed so amaz 
ingly capable of a genuine understanding 
about Bill, it was likely enough he d see 
it that way, too. 

Sally said: "Norma and Bill are both my 
friends." 

"Norma? Norma?" Unpredictable as 
ever, Mr. Albany brought the name out 
like a pistol-shot, adding, "Who s she?" 

"Why, Bill s wife, of course," said Sally. 
The whole story was so well known to 
M.-F. that she had vaguely assumed Mr. 
Albany must know it, too, but he leaned 
forward so attentively, and with such an 
odd expression on his face, that she won 
dered if he could possibly know Norma. 
But no, obviously he didn t; there must be 
some other reason for that almost tense 
stare, and she explained: "And my best 
friend, too. They were both very good to 
me when the man I was going to marry 
was killed. That s one of the reasons I 
like to help Bill now." 

"But I d no idea. I thought . . . good 



heavens, girl, why didn t you tell me! Why 
in the world didn t you tell me?" demanded 
Eonald Albany. 

Since by this time Sally had given up 
any attempt to understand him at all, she 
could only gaze surprisingly at him as he 
got up and walked across to her. Then all 
at once something so human and ruffled 
and boyish in his face banished all thought 
of Bill and Norma and precipitated her 
into a curious state of auger and curiosity 
and something less easily recognisable, all 
of it concentrated against this same Rotuu" 
Albany whose moods and temperaments 
had blown like storms through the last 
few days. What did he think? What did 
he think? she asked herself in a sudden 
blaze of bright-eyed fury. 

"Because you were so beastly, that s why 
I didn t tell you," she said. 

"I? Beastly? To you?" 

"Yes. Hateful. Detestable. You wort 
utterly, wickedly inhuman . . ." 

"Inhuman? I?" said Bonnie. 

He had run his hand through his hair, 
and below its ruffled (and oddly endearing) 
line, his own eyes accused her in turn as 
he said: 

"And what do you think you were! What 
was I supposed to feel when it was more 
than you could do to smile at me? When 
all you did was to tell me what old M.-F. 
did? When you just whisked in and out 
of the office as if you thought I had 
leprosv . . ." 

"I didn t," said Sally. 

She tried to sound fierce, but she couldn t. 

For pride s sake she tried to remember she 

was still very angry, but she couldn t do 

it. Not with her heart dancing wildly 

[Turn to page 50.] 




tarts 

crisp. 



scones 

light, 



ca 



kes 



Piecrusts 

delightful 



Use Aunt Mary s Baking 

Powder and you ll discover the secret of all 
delicious Baking. 

ALWAYS USE 

(ItMtt ttfatt/JL 

BAKING POWDER 

Ask for all the Aunt Mary s. Pure Food Products 




14 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




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Australian Home Journal, November I, 1949 



15 



DIAMOND YOKE JUMPER 



This well-shaped little jumper is one of 
the easiest Fair Isle garments to make. It 
is knitted in simple stocking-stitch in 
cyclamen with a yoke back and front 
worked in dark purple and cyclamen in 
"diamond" pattern. 

Materials: 6 ozs. fingering cyclamen 3- 
ply wool, and 1 oz. in dark purple; 1 pair 
each of Nos. 10 and 12 knitting needles; 
3 small buttons; a No. 12 crochet hook 
- Measurements: Length, 21 inches. Bust, 
34-35 inches. Sleeve seams, 5$ inches. 

Tension: 7 ats. in width and 9 rows in 
depth to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st., 
stitch; sts., stitches; beg., begin or begin 
ning; alt., alternate or alternately; tog., 
together; fin., finish or finishing; st.-st., 
stocking-stitch; k. on the right side and p. 
on the wrong alternately; inc., increase or 
increasing; dec., decrease or decreasing; 
cyl., cyclamen; pur., purple; rep., repeat; 
ptn., pattern; rem., remain or remaining; 
cont., continue. 

The Front. 

Using No. 12 needles and cyl. wool cast 
on 108 sts., and work in k. 1, p. 1 ribbing 
for 3J ins. Change to No. 10 needles and 
proceed in st.-st. for 2 ins. Inc. 1 st. each 
end of next k. row and every following 



6th row 9 times, making 128 sts. Gout, 
without further inc., until front measures 
12$ ins. from beg., fin. after a p. row. 

Shape Annholes: Cast off 5 sts. at start 
of next 4 rows. Dec. 1 st. each end of 
following 5 rows, leaving 98 sts. P. next 
row. Join on pur., and * k. 1 pur., 1 cyl., 
rep. from * to end of row. P. next row in 
pur. Now beg. ptn. 

1st row * K. 4 pur., 2 cyl., 2 pur. Bep. 
from * to last 2 sts., 2 pur. 

2nd row * P. 3 pur., 4 cyl., 1 pur. Hep. 
from * to last 2 sts., 2 pur. 

3rd row * K. 2 pur., 6 cyl. Eep. from * 
to last 2 sts., 2 pur. 

4th row As 2nd row. 

5th row As 1st row. 

6th row* P. 2 cyl., 6 pur. Eep. from * 



4 pur., 4 eyl. Eep. 




to last 2 sts., 2 cyl. 
7th row K. 3 cyl., 

from *, ending 3 cyl. 

8th row * P. 4 cyl., 2 pur., 2 cyl. Eep. 

from * to last 2 sts., 2 cyl. 

9th row * K. 3 cyl., 4 pur., 1 cyl. Eep. 

from * to last 2 sts., 2 cyl. 

10th row * P. 2 cyl., 6 pur. Eep. from * 

to last 2 stitches, 2 eyl. 

These 10 rows form the "diamond" ptn. 

Eep. them until armholes measure 5 ins. 

in depth, measured straight up; fin. after 
a p. row. 

Shape Neck: 
Ptn. 41, turn. 
Cont. in ptn. oh 
these 41 sts., dee. 
1 st. at neck edge 
on every row until 
30 sts. remain. 
Work without 
shaping until arm- 
hole measures 7 
inches in depth, 
finishing at arm- 
hole edge. 
Shape Shoulder: 

Next row Cast 
off 7 sts., work to 
neck. 

Following row 
Work to end of 
row. Eep. these 2 
rows twice. Cast 
off rem. sts. Slip 
the centre 16 sts. 
on to a spare 
needle and leave 
for the present. 
Ee-join wool to 
inside edge of 
rem. sts., and cont. 
in ptn., dec. 1 st. 
at neck edge on 
every row until 30 
sts. rem. Work 
without shaping 
until armhole 
measures 7 ins. in 
depth, fin. at arm- 
hole edge. 

Next row Cast 
off 7 sts., work to 
neck. 

Next row Work 
to end of row. Eep. 
these 2 rows twice. 
Cast off. 

Front Neckband : 
With the right 
side of the work 



facing and using No. 12 needles join on 
cyl. wool and pick up and k. 25 sts. along 
the neck edge, 16 sts. from the spare 
needle, 25 sts. along the neck edge to the 
shoulder (66 sts.). Work in k. 1, p. 1 rib 
for 1 inch. Cast off loosely in ribbing. 
The Back. 

Using No. 12 needles and cyl. wool, cast 
on 108 sts. and work as given for the front 
until the armhole shapings are completed 
and 98 sts. rem. Cont. in "diamond" ptn. 
without shaping until armholes measure 
6J inches in depth, measured straight up 
and not round armhole, and ending with a 
purl row. 
Shape Neck and Shoulders: 

Next row Cast off 7 sts., ptn. 28, count 
ing sts. already on right-hand needle after 
casting off, turn. Work on these sts. thus: 

1st row P. 2 tog., ptn. to the end. 

2nd row Cast off 7 sts., ptn. to the last 
2 sts., k. 2 tog. Eep. these 2 rows once 
more. 

5th row As the 1st row. Cast off the 
rem. sts. 

Slip the centre 28 sts. on to a spare 
needle and leave for the neck. Eejoin wool 
at needle point and work one row to the 
armhole. 

Next row Cast off 7 sts., ptn. to the last 
2 sts., p. 2 tog. 

Next row K. 2 tog., ptn. to the end of 
the row. Eep. these 2 rows twice more. 
Cast off. 
Back Neckband: 

With the right side of work facing and 
using cyl. wool and No. 12 needles, pick up 
and k. 12 sts. along the neck edge, 28 from 
the spare needle and 12 sts. along the neck 
edge (52 sts.). Work in k. 1, p. 1 rib for 
1 inch. Cast off loosely in the rib. 
Sleeves. 

Using No. 12 needles and cyl. wool, cast 
on 78 sts. Work in k. 1, p. 1 rib for 1$ 
inches. Change to No. 10 needles. 

Inc. row K. 5, * k. twice into next st.. 
k. 3, rep. from * until 4 sts. rem., k. 4. 
P. the next row. Cont. in st.-st., inc. 1 st. 
each end of every following 6th row until 
there are 102 sts. Cont. without further 
inc. until the sleeve measures 5$ inches 
from the beg. Shape the top. Cast off 4 
sts. at the beg. of the next two rows, then 
dec. at the end of every row until there 
are 48 sts. Cast off 6 sts. at the beg. of 
the following 8 rows. Fasten off. 
To Make Up. 

Lightly press the yokes on the wrong 
side. Join the right shoulder seam. Join 
the left shoulder seatn for about one inch 
from armhole edge. With crochet hook, 
work three rows of double-crochet along 
back shoulder edge and one row along the 
front shoulder. On the second row, make 
three loop buttonholes and sew buttons on 
back shoulder to correspond. Pin in the 
tops of sleeves and back-stitch to armholes. 
Press open sleeve seams whilst the work is 
flat. Seam up the sides and sleeve seams 
and lightly press these. Finally, lightly 
press jumper on wrong side, omitting all 
ribbing. 

When working in two-colour knitting, 
note when you change from one colour to 
another that the wool discarded should be 
woven in with your knitting along the 
back of work to the next position in the 
row at which you will require it. The wool 
to be woven in should be held in the left 
hand as for crochet, the working wool to 
be held in the right hand. The wool should 
be woven in with every alternate stitch. 

To weave in one colour with another on 

[Turn to page 3/5.] 



iioer . , i 



Socks of 
Quality & Distinction 



Of COURSfl 




All Wool Socks for men are made of 
yarn spun by Lincoln frfcm Australia s 
finest fleeces. They fit perfectly and 
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PRODUCT OF LINCOLN MILLS (AUSTRALIA) LIMITED 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



!7 









Frock, 7410 Is. 6d. 
3| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Skirt cut on bias. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



Blouse, 11,493 Is. 3d. 

If yds. 36 ins. wide. 

32, 36, 40 ins. bust. 







Skirt, 12,194 Is. 3d. 

2jj yds. 36 ins. wide. 

27 to 35 ins. waist. 



>Q 



Coat, 7238 Is. 6d. 

4i{ yds. 36 ins. wide 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



Sfteuc 



x --r??r !r 

1 I 
A Bride s Dress 

A bridal gown shown at an exclusive 
house was of lustrous satin. The long 
sweep of the train was accented further 
with a wide band around the entire skirt 
and train. This band was exquisitely em 
broidered in champagne tinted sequins and 
embroidery. Full length sleeves tapered 
to fit the wrists ; the bodice was pointed in 
front, and around the shoulders was a band 
repeating the embroidery and sequins of 
the band on the skirt. A sheer, almost 
invisible, yoke of fine net extended to the 
round neck line. The skirt was shirred 
decoratively to the bodice. 



Bridesmaid dresses are delightfully young 
and romantic. They are fashioned of 
champagne tinted net and are worn over a 
gleaming satin under-skirt. 






\ 



Frock, 7412 Is. 6d. 

4i yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Contrast : ] yd. 36 ins. wide. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. -Payment mast be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 



18 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



Frock, 7402 Is. 6d 
4 yds. 36 ins. wide 

Skirt on bias 
Sizes 32 



Frock, 7433 Is. 6d. 

3J yds. 36 ins. wide 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Matron s Frock, 

Is. lOd. 
4 yds. 36 ins. 
Sizes 34 to 48 




The way that women look 
will not have greatly changed 
due to the Paris Spring 
dress collections. 

Skirts, as in the London 
dress shows, are shorter, of 
that there is no doubt. But 
thirteen and a half to four 
teen inches from the ground 
was already general usage for 
tailored dresses and suits so 
that the eye is not startled 



when afternoon dresses also 
rise to that height. 

Shoulders, despite a move- 
to square them, remain on 
the slope. And there are 
still plenty of princess, belt- 
less dresses although we have 
said goodbye to the difficult 
Empire lines which rose so 
high under. the bust, retain 
ing instead the smooth, small 
natural waist. 



Frock, 7428 Is. 6d. 

4} yds. 36 ins. wide 

Contrast | yd. 36 ins. wide 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postqge on each Pattern, l%d. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



19 



Frock, 9085 Is. 6d. 

16 to 18 years. 

32 inches bust. 
41 yds. 36 ins. wide. 




Frock, 9073 Is. 3d. 

10 and 12 years. 

1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Plain, If yds. 36 ins. wide 



Frock, 9097 Is. 3d. 

12 and 14 years. 

3 1 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Contrast : 

yd. 36 ins. wide. 



Pinafore Frock, 

9999 Is. 3d. 

6 and 8 years. 

Blouse, 1 j- yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Skirt, Ig yds. 36 ins. wide. 




Necklines 

Necklines are styled this 
year. For example, there are 
star-pointed collars, a man 
darin neckline which develops 
from a bib-yoke of contrast 
stitch, a button-opening neck 



line with small Peter Pan col 
lar and bodice-pocket flaps 
repeating the curve of the 
collar. 

There is more style in the 
skirts, too (the line spotlights 
two-piece styles). There are 
four-gore moderately flared 
skirts for young customers 
who prefer not - too - slim 
skirts ; there are also new 
" pleat " effects via ribbing. 



(Often the pattern of ribbing 
in the skirt is picked up in a 
ribbed section of the bodice.) 
All the skirts have elasticized 
waistbands, " and each dress 
has a self belt (backed). 

From Paris 

Paris in summer and 
sheer delicate wools are star 
red wherever fashionable 
Parisiennes meet. 




[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.] 



20 



Australian Home Journal, November I, 1949 



CUT OUT THIS RECIPE 



A Cadbury Recipe that you ll use often 




PUDDING 



Ingredients : 

5 ozs. stale bread cut into i inch dice. 
3 O2s. sugar, 2 tablespoons water, 
1 table spoon finely chopped candied 
peel, a handful of sultanas, grated rind 
and juice of 1 lemon, 1 large egg, 
1 heaped dessertspoon Bournville Cocoa, 
pint milk. 

Method : Put sugar and water into a small sauccpa : and boil 
till a light golden-brown caramel. Cool slightly, add hot 
milk. Beat egg, add cocoa and mix well. Add milk 
and caramel. Pour over bread ; add fruits, rind and 
juice of lemon. A few tablespoons sherry and cream may 
be added if available. (Sugar and fruit juice mav be 
added to bread in lieu of caramel.) Place in greased 
basin with greased paper covering and steam for two hours. 
Cadbury s Bournville Cocoa is the two-way food as a 
daily drink it is delicious and nourishing and when used 
in cooking it gives every dish a really satisfying chocolaty 
flavour. Children especially need its sustaining goodness. 
Serve it regularly . . . it s ever so economical . . . there s 
"120 cups o the Ib " and it s now only l/7d. the half 
pound (in Metropolitan Areas). 




Goodbye to 





in S minutes 



B *ir Just smooth on this dainty white 

cream. Leave it on for 3 minutes 
only. Then wash it away. All ugly hair 
is gone leaving your skin soft, white and 
silken smooth. This is the modern safe 
scientific Veet method of melting away 
disfiguring hair without cuts, stubble or 
shadow. Veet actually discourages regrowth 
of hair. Get a 29 tube today. Successful 
results absolutely guaranteed with Veet 
or money refunded. 

VEET CREAM 



For a burnt or stained aluminium pan, 
boil an onion in it, or rhubarb, or cover 
bottom with salad oil and let stand. 



To clean nickel make a paste of whiting 
and kerosene, rub well, leave for an hour 
or so and polish. 



FORD PILLS 




Wise Mother Hubbard 
Goes to the cupboard, 
But not to get a bone. 
She gets Ford Pills 
For the simple ills 
That bother every home. 

Ford Pills are the gentle, 
tasteless, painless laxative for 
all your family. In plastic 
tubes, 2/6 everywhere. FP . U 



FORD PILLS 



Pain soothed instantly 




BROUGHT TO A HEAD 




Nature often causes a boil to 
come to a head and thus easc- 
palnful misery . . . BUT 
doctors agree that moist heat 
coupled with a poultice action 
helps bring boils to a 
head quicker. An 
easy, practical way 
for you to apply moist 
heat is by using 
proven, world-famous 



MEOICATEO 

POULTICE! 







VAREX" FOR BAD LEGS 



NO RESTING REQUIRED 



There s no need to lie up with a bad leg. 
One man actually worked overtime while 
using "Varex" Treatment. 4 to 6 dress 
ings one a week usually suffice. 

"Varex" heals all ulcers, old or new. 
Very soothing, and relieves pain quickly 
and permanently. Easy and inexpensive. 
Write for free booklet to-day, to Ernest 
Healey, Pharmaceutical Chemist, Varex, 
Rooms 523-524, 5th Floor, St. Jamea 
Building. I09W Elizabeth Street. Sydney. 

Water in which sweet com has been 
cooked makes delicious soup. Add thicken 
ing and milk. 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



21 



Pyjanias, 10,574 Is. lOd. 

4 yds. 36 ins. v/ide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Slip, 10,567 Is. 3d. 
J yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



Slip, 10,570- 
2|- yds. 36 ins 
Lace, | yd. 36 
Sizes 32 to 




Nightdress Ensemble, 

10,569 Is. lOd. 

4| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Sizes 32 to 40 ins. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
Australian Home Journal, 1 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, ld. extra.] 



22 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



Fashion as 
a Career 

Learn Dresscutting 
Designing and Dressmaking 

Be compel ;nt to cut and make perfect fitting 
clothes for every figure. Save money and know 
the joy of wearing perfect fitting garments. 

PERSONAL AND POSTAL LESSONS 

Our schools are known everywhere for our suc 
cessful graduates, and our methods endorsed by 
leading Fashion houses throughout the British 
Empire. Lessons are simple, inexpensive and 
given by expert teachers. 

Call, Write or Phone for Free Booklet 

I MAIL COUPON TO NEAREST BRANCH 1 

IMcCabe Academy I 

Please send me, without obligation, your Free 
I Booklet about Dressmaking Lessons, for which I I 

enclose 2Jd. stamp. 



I 

I Name 

I Address 

Personal or Postal Tuition? 



I 




u: 

McCABE ACADEMY of DRESSMAKING 

THE FOREMOST AND LARGEST SCHOOL OF FASHION. 
Sydney: Canberra House, 295 Elizabeth St., Box 2424. , 

Melbourne: Manchester Unity Bldgs., Swanston and Collins Sts., Box 338C. 
Brisbane: Penny s Buildings, Adelaide St. Entrance, Box I8I6W, G.P.O. 
Perth: National House, William St., Box 482. 
Adelaide: Shell House, North Terrace, Box 5I9E. 
South Africa: Shakespeare House, Commission St., Johannesburg, P.O. Box 3611. 



INSTANTLY REDUCE 

Your Waist 



and Hips 




Residents of Sydney and 
Suburbs are invited to 
accept a free trial fitting 
of the FIGURE CONTROL 
CORSET. Call when in 
town, or telephone MA5308 



You will look and feel younger and smarter wearing a FIGURE 
CONTROL CORSET. Its gentle changing pressure will slim 
your hips and waistline, and beautify your figure with every move 
you make. Gives natural balanced support and soothing control. 
Made of superfine fabrics, and is individually fashioned ior every 
client. 

FIGURE CONTROL has these improvements : I. Cross-over pull-front 

no busks or lacing. 2. Stretch-controlled elastic inserts. 3. Simplified front 

tastering, instantly adjustable for reduction 4. Spiral boning for reedom. 
flexibility, figure loveliness. 

7 Days Trial 

You can try the Figure Control Corset for 7 days AT MY RISK, to prove it 
wrll give comforting support and uplift, and, lovely, slim, youthful grace and 
energy to your figure. 

The FIGURE CONTROL COPSET can be suoplied by post to country 
and interstate residents. Wr/te now for free illustrated Booklet 
and Measurement Form. Mention this fa>er. 

MISS FLORENCE BRADSHAW, 

FIGURE CONTROL CORSET CO., 

5th Floor, P.A. Building, 
243 ELIZABETH STREET. SYDNEY. 



MYEf. 



LACK OF ENERGY. 

FAILING MEMORY ETC. 
THYTHKNIW1 

HORMONE 
PRODUCT 



I MEMORY ETC. 

THEI* 

FREE 




Science has proved 
that our physical and 
mental energy are de 
pendent upon our 
supplies of hormones, 
and that any hormone 
deficiency may be bal 
anced by taking in 
ternally a genuine hor 
mone preparation. 
Science has also ascer 
tained that the taking 
of such a preparation 
will considerably stim 
ulate the hormone formation in the body. 
We have a genuine hormone product that 
renews energy, improves the memory, 
restores nerves and overcomes general 
fatigue, restlessness, irritability, and. re 
vitalises the system. Do not confuse this 
product with ordinary patent medicines. 
It is something different and carries a 
Money-Back Guarantee of Complete Satis 
faction in 10 days. Send stamp with name 
and address, stating if Mr., Mrs. or Miss, 
and a Free Sample will be posted under 
sealed cover. 



FREE SAMPLE 



A. O. 



BALDWIN & CO., 
9 Martin Place, Sydney. 

Send sample of your Hormone product, 
enclose stamp for postage. 

NAME 



(Mr., Mrs., Miss) 



ADDRESS 



STATE 

(Block letters, please) 



DEAF? 

"CHICO" INVISIBLE 
EARPHONES, 2I/- Pr. 

Worn inside your ears, no cords or bat 
teries. Guaranteed for your Lifetime. 
"Chico" Earphones have enjoyed an un 
interrupted sale on the Australian market 
for over 20 years. Write for Free Booklet. 
HEARS EARPHONE CO., No. 30 State 
Shopping Block, Market Street, Sydney. 



Superfluous Hair 
Killed Quickly 




By "EXHAIR." Perfectly 
harmless. Guaranteed. Send 
stamped addressed envelop* 
for particulars. Confidential. 
Janet Clanville, 247H Eliza 
beth Street, Sydney. 



To make Everton Toffee boil 1 Ib. of best 
brown sugar in a pint of water, until a 
little will harden if dropped into cold 
water; then add 2 ozs. of butter and boil 
a few moments until it will harden again. 

Tflavmir with Ipmnn. if HpsiTAfV 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



23 



Play Suit, 
9930 Is. 3d. 
6,8, 10, 12 years 
Blouse, 
U yds. 
36 ins. wide. 
Shorts, 
1? yds. 
36 ins. xvide. 




Sun Frock, 9106 Is. 3d. Soft Colours 



6 and 8 years. 
2 yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Soft colours predominate at Paris mid-season collectic 
and newest shades include straw, honey and lemon yeilo 
together with the warmer biscuit, apricot and spice tor 
Other favourites are wistaria mauves, rich blues, grass gre 
and true candy or soft blotting-paper pinks as well as a li 
orange and tangerine. Black is featured for formal wear : 
white makes important summer fashion news, while m 
coatfrocks and suits appear in grey or navy wool accented v 
white. Generally the trend is toward main ensembles in i 
colour only 




Girls Overalls, 

9574 Is. 3d. 

2,4, 6, 8, "10, 12 years. 

2| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Contrast : 2 L yd. 36 ins. wide 



Sun Frock, 9098 Is. 3d. 

2, 4, 6, 8 years. 
1 1 yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Blouse and Shorts, 

9100 Is. 3d. 
6,8, 10, 12, 14 years. 
2| yds. 36 ins. wide. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \\d. extra.} 



24 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



Frock and Bloomers, 

9088 Is. 3d. 
2 and 4 years. 
2J yds. 36 ins. wide 



Carrying Coat, 

9094 Is. 3d. 

If yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Baby s Frock, 
9093 Is. 3d. 

yds. 
36 ins. wide, 



Sun Suit, 9103 Is. 3d. 

1 to 2 years . 
1 yd. 36 ins. wide. 




Frock, 9000 Is. 3d. 

1 to 2 years. 
H yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Shorter Skirts 

Skirts, which are definitely 
shorter with day dresses 13 
inches from the ground, may be 
either full or straight but not 
too tight. Floating panels 
strike a new note and, although 
full swinging skirts below close 
fitting bodices still hold sway 
for evening, there are many 
long tubular skirts covered by 
sheer detachable overskirts. 

>: * * 

Emphasis is still on asyme- 
trical lines expressed in uneven 



hems, sawedged necklines and 
in the placing of trimmings and 
fastenings. Square sheer wool 
scarves tucked into belts or 
pockets heighten this impres 
sion, while buttons are used 
in slanting rows to fasten jack 
ets, on both backs and fronts of 
bodices and even on side- 
seams. Although matching 
buttons are in high favour, 
there are some in natural and 
smoked mother o pearl and 
others in glass centred with 
flowers or fishermen s flies. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. s Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal/ 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal, November 1 , 1 949 



25 



1500 Books on 

DRESSMAKING 

Absolutely FREE! 




LOVELY DRESSES FOR YOURSELF AND 
CLOTHES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY. 

You do want smart, attractive c oLhes, don t 
you> Of course you do things with style and 
originality; but when shopping for them you 
find it practically impossible to gt a frock 
within your means, or one that isn t duplicated 
at least a dozen times wh?n you walk down the 
street. But still it is possible for YOU to bo 
one of the smartest dressers. It is possible tor 
you to make clothes for all your loved onus 
and YOU RE SAVING MONEY all the time. 
This is the opportunity of a lifetime. Send for 
this splendidly illustrated free Bock, "How to 
Design, Cut and Make Smarter Clothes." It 
tells you how. But you must hurry 

HURRY COUPON FOR YOUR COPY 

SEND KO MONEY 



THE DUNRICH SCHOOL OF 
| DRESSMAKING 

IDept. 8, 21 Cl.-.renre Street, 
Sydney, N.S.W. 4 
I Dear Madame 

Send me by return mail your FREE BOOK 
| all about Dressmaking and Designing, en 

(titled "How to Design, Cut, and Make Smarter 
Clothes." Enclosed 2 Id in stamps. 

| NAME , 

I ADDRESS. . 



1 1/49 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 
EASILY REMOVED 
AT HOME 

Hundreds of women are 
overjoyed ar the e?sy way 
the famous Swedish Wax 
Pencils remove unsightly 
hairs without d scomfort. 
leaving the skin clean, 
velvety, baby-smooth and 
lovely. Successfully re 
moves rtubborn hairs in a 
ew seconds. The hair 
comes right OUT not 
merely off from face, 
ams, legs and back o 
neck. Superior to all 
known methods. No 

stubby regrowth, no "shaved off" look. 
Pure, safe natural ingredients no smelly 
chemicals Positively non-irritating. Sold 
on Money-back Guarantee for only IO/- post 
free. Sent under plain wrapper. Send Money 
Order (obtainable at any P.O.) to-day to : 

Department O., 

SOUTHERN GILBERT CO. LTD., 
8 Boulcott St., Wellington, N.Z. 





Writt Watchei, Cameras. Ma -Ma Dolls. 
fountain Pens. Many other Valuable Prizes for 
selling small parcels of tested garden seed*. Send 
for parcel and big catalogue of presents. Send no 
money now, on/y name a^d address. Write to-day. 
John B. Murray, 461KGoro St.. Sydney 



NOW you can get back 

REGULARITY 



and build 
yourself 

UP 
without 

medicines 





Kellogg s All-Bran is a natural 

LAXATIVE. .HEALTH FOOD. .BLOOD TONIC 



Your health depends on what you 
eat every day. To-day s soft, 
mushy, over cooked foods often 
lack the vital bulk your system 
needs for regular elimination. 
Kellogg s All-Bran supplies 
smooth-acting bulk which helps 
prepare internal wastes for easy, 
gentle and natural elimination . . . 
no medicines needed. 

Health Food 

Made from the vital outer layers 
of wheat, Kellogg s All-Bran 
brings you more protective food 
elements than whole wheat itself! 
Kellogg s All-Bran is actually 
richer in iron than spinach and 
it is a natural source of Vitamins 
B, for the nerves, B, for the eyes, 
Calcium for the teeth, Phosphorus 
for the bones and Niacin for the 
skin. It not only relieves con 
stipation but builds you up day 
by day at the same time. 




Kellogg s All-Bran has a tasty 
toasted, nutty flavour. You may 
prefer to eat it sprinkled over 
your favourite breakfast cereal or 
straight out of the packet with 
sliced fruit, milk and sugar. Sold 
at all grocers. 




"TIRED 
BLOOD" 

and 
Blemishes 



Kellog-gr s All-Bran is a tonic 
for your blood rich in iron. 
Richer than spinach. It helps 
keep your blood at its proper 
iron level. Does away with 
"tired blood" . . . cleanses away 
blood impurities as it cleanses 
put internal impurities. The 
iron in KellogR s All-Bran pro 
tects your skin from ugly 
pimples .and blemishes. 




ALL-BRAN 

fc Registered Trade Mark 



26 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




"My Friend Irma," Prince Edward. 



entertain the enemy with a 
jam session, and prevail 
over them with the help of 
the music itself. Others in 
the cast: Benny Goodman, 
Hugh Herbert, Steve Coch- 
ran, J. Edward Bromberg, 
Felix Bressart, Ludwig 
Stossel, O. Z. Whitehead 
and Esther Dale. 

* * * 

At the Liberty, in 
"Edward, My Son," Spencer 
Tracy plays Arnold Boult, 
a man whose frantic ob 
session to provide the best 
for his only child brings 
ruin to everyone with whom 
his life is bound. In a 
sequence of events covering 
a period of thirty years, 
Arnold Boult rises from an 



The Ploy and Film 



The new Danny Kaye 
film, "A Song is Born," at 
the Eegent, is, as you would 
expect, a mad, whimsical 
affair concerning seven pro 
fessors who have worked 
for years on a history of 
music. Professor Frisbee 
(Danny Kaye), in charge 
of the American section, is 
confident ragtime is right 
up to the minute; but when 
two window washers intro 
duce him to swing and jive 
and boogie woogie, Frisbee 
determines to explore the 
world of jazz. He invites to 
his house a lot of musical 
bigwigs and a beauteous 
torch singer named Honey 
(Virginia Mayo). Honey, 
unfortunately, is engaged 
to an underworld character 
who wants to marry her. 
It s all so complicated. 





"Quartet" Embassy. 

Frisbee haa fallen in love with Honey. 
The bad man and his henchmen steal 
Honey, but she baulks at marrying him. 
He takes her back to Friabee s and 
there threatens to liquidate Frisbee if 
she stiH is stubborn. Covered by machine 
guns, Friabee and his jazz companions 



"A Song is Born," Regent. 
obscure middle-class London businessman to become 
a peer and one of the richest financiers in the land. 
But at what a cost! He drives his business partner 
to suicide, he changes his wife from a happy, de 
voted woman, to a bitter and disillusioned alcoholic; 
he almost succeeds in debarring his best friend 
from the medical profession; he tries to wrest his 
son s illegitimate child from its mother. In the end 
his world crumples about him and he emerges from 
prison the obscure man he started out. Tracy com 
bines a burning intensity with cold ruthlessness in 
his portrait of Arnold Boult, making it stand out 
as one of the most memorable acting achievements 
of his brilliant career. He is ably seconded in the 
work by Deborah Kerr in the role of the wife whose 
character and integrity he destroys. Excellent sup 
port is given by Ian Hunter as the family doctor, 
Larry Woodhope; Leueen MacGrath as the secretary 
with whom Boult has an affair; Mervyn Johns as 
his ill-fated business partner; Tilsa Page as the girl 
who bears his son s child, and a large group of other 
well-known players. 

* * 

Tivoli Theatre has revived vaudeville again with 
the revue, "Talk of the Town," and a galaxy of 
overseas talent, starring Ben Wrigley, young English 
comedian, who has set a new standard for clowning 
and turns on something different in comedy that is 
most amusing. Other members of his eccentric 
rubber-necked type of act are his wife, Joy Dexter, 
and Dick Thorpe. Another artist, who also rates as 
a top liner, is French comedy pianist, Eolly Bolls, 
born in Paris and famed in Europe prior to World 



War II as a concert pianist, gives a hint 
of his real pianistie skill in the Chopin 
medley, although Bach and boogie woogie 
come alike to his dippling fingers. The 
tumbling of the Elwardos, the acrobatic 
feats of the Swiss Stars, the dancing of 
Eileen O Dare, the droll Oliver Wakefield, 
the clever impersonations of Paul Began 
and many others highlight a well-balanced 
programme of variety. 

* * * 

At the Plaza we have an extraordinary 
picture about a girl who lives with her 
father in the African Congo. Her constant 
companion is Joe, a baby gorilla. Ten 
years later a Hollywood night club pro 
prietor yearns for a new sensation and 
decides to capture wild animals in Africa, 
He purposes introducing them to his gar 
ish night club for the amusement of his 
jaded and blase patrons. It would have 
been cheaper to take his patrons to the zoo, 
but script writers don t 
worry about that sort of 
thing. Among other animals, 
the baby gorilla, now fully 
grown, is secured, and the 
girl, now seventeen years, 
is persuaded to sign a con 
tract; but neither are 
happy in the atmosphere of 
the night club. Some drunks 
toss full whisky bottles into 
the gorilla s cage, who goes 
b^ serk and wrecks the 
club. Later the gorilla re 
habilitates himself when he 
saves a lot of children from 
a burning orphanage. In the 
cast: Terry Moore, Ben 
Johnson, Bobert Armstrong, 
Joseph Young, Frank 
M Hugh, Eegis Toomey, 
Denis Green. Plenty of 
action and certainly origi 
nal in conception. 

* * * 

In "Quartet" (Embassy) 
a father gives his nineteen- 
year-old son three pieces of 
advice. He tells him not to 




Eileen O Dare, Tivoli. 
gamble, not to lend money, and to 
have nothing to do with women. The 
son does well in a tennis tournament 
on the Continent and the night before 
the team leaves he visits the Sport 
ing Club. A member of the English 



Australian Home Journal, November I, 1949 



27 




\ V - 



Stewart the picture brings 
one of his colourful roles, 
as well as his return to 
M-G-M for the first time 
since the war. Opposite 
him for the first time is 
June Allyson, who steps 
into the dramatic por 
trayal of Stratton s sweet 
heart and wife and whose 
encouragement proves the 
inspiration behind his 
whole life. Supporting 
them are "Frank Morgan, 
Agues Moorehead and Bill 
Williams. 

* * * 

Oliver Hardy is at 
present playing a comic 
role in John Wayne s com 
ing Eepublic film, 
"Strange Car-avan," in 
which Vera Kalston has 




"Mighty Joe 



RoUy Rolls, Tivoli. 
team persuades him to try his luck 
at the tables. Nicky puts on a 
100-franc note. He wins, and 
then goes on winning. As he 
leaves the table an attractive 
adventuress borrows a thousand 
francs. So you see the son has 
not followed in father s verbal 
footsteps. Unusual happenings 
follow, and Nicky is in the midst 
of it all. The play is bright and 
entertaining and is a screen 
adaptation of four of Somerset 
Maugham s short stories. Summed 
up: Bright, fast-moving, delight 
fully unfolded and interest- hold 
ing. In the cast: Basil Eadford, 
Nauntbn Wayne, Ian Fleming, 
Jack Baine, Angela Baddeley, 
James Robertson Justice, Jack 





"Stratton Story," St. James . 
Watling, Nigel Buchanan, Mai Zetterling, 
Jean Cavall. 

* * * 

"The Stratton Story," at St. James , is 
about a real-life American who came 
from Texas to win fame as a pitching base 
ball star. After two seasons that appeared 
to put him on the verge of all-time great 
ness, he suffered a hunting accident that 
caused amputation of his right leg. How he 
came hack, eight years later, to resume a 
pitching careejr in the game he loved and 
to be named the "most courageous athlete 
of the year" is one of the real inspiring 
stories in the history of sports. For James 



"Britannia Mews," Century. 

the feminine lead. 
This marks only the 
second time since the 
rotund , comedian 
joined up with Stan 
Laurel in 1926 to be 
come one of the most 
famous comic teams 
in pictures that the 
two have been separ 
ated- in their profes 
sional careers. How 
ever, ,thc separation 
is not permanent, and 
the two will be to 
gether as soon as they 
find a good script. 
* * 

Film star Sonja 
Henie has married 
New York socialite 
Winthrop Gardiner. 
Henie divorced millionaire Dan Top 
ping in April. Gardiner, a business 
executive, also has been divorced. 



"Britannia Mews," at the Century, is 
the story of Adelaide Culver, a girl who 
forsakes her family s fashionable London 
home for her art teacher, only to find 
domestic drudgery and unhappiness in the 
slums of London s "mews," which are nar 
row, cobble-lined carriageways lined by 
stables that have been converted into shops 
and quarters designed for coachmen and 
grooms. When tragedy intervenes, Adelaide 



Young" Plaza. 

feeJs she can again regain the 
life she had known, but the 
machinations of a blackmailer 
keeps her in the mews. Soon, 
however, a charming, ne er-do- 
well lawyer comes into her life 
and this time she is rewarded 
with the happiness she so 
richly deserves. Headliners in 
the cast: Dana Andrews, 
Maureen O Hara, Dame Sybil 
Thorndyke, Diane Hart, Anne 

Butchart, Fay Compton. 

* * * 

John Agar is having a test 
ing time in "I Married a Com 
munist." He will play his first 
love scenes with someone other 
than his wife, Shirley Temple. 
There are plenty of kisses be 
tween him and Janet Carter. 
John is still new to film 
making and he blushed about 
it. He did not want Shirley 




"Edward, My Son," Liberty. 

to be watching these kissing sequences. 

* * * 

Harold Lloyd is happy about his son s 
acting} ability, and he proposes staging a 
co-star comedy soon in which father and 
son will play the leads. 

Bing Crosby objects to playing the part 
of a drunk on the screen. It is more than 
likely that Danny Kaye will be starred in 
the film version of "Harvey." 

* * * 

[Turn to page 32.] 



28 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




cult 



THE way to stop these head 
aches. 



EFFECTS" (doesn t slow you 



2. 



up, leave you dizzy or de 
pressed) 



ASPRO DOES NOT HARM HEART 
OR STOMACH (call on Aspro as 
often as you need without the 
slightest fear. It is also non habit- 
forming) 

ASPRO ACTS SWIFTLY 
( Ascro has to be effective to 
have the biggest sale in the 
world of any medicine of its 
kind). 



NOHFIER-EmaS~.il 

ASPRO 

OOEf HOT HARM THE HEART OR STOMACH 
Try ASPRO Tablets 
with your cup of tea! v \\// 



When housework makes you feel jaded, nerve- 

racked and "headachy," try ASPRO AND - 

A CUP OF TEA. The Aspro soothes and / 
calms you the tea gives you a lift. It s a /. 
wonderful combination every housewife should , . 
know. 




AI5/19 



Never MI 
toe splinter 





The smallest injury can 
become infected. Never 
take a chance! 
Always use BAND-AID ad 
hesive bandage, the ready- 
made dressing for all minor 
injuries. 

l!\ PACKETS OF 12 FOR 
8d. OR FAMILY SIZE 24 
FOR I/ 3d. at all chemist* 
and stores. M , ., .,,. 

THE PERFECT >^- / 

READY-MADE 

DRESSING 




PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 

WORLD S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS 
OF SURGICAL DRESSINGS 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



29 




Materials required: 1 ball crochet cotton 
No. 3; 1 crochet hook No. 5i; f yard linen 
20 inches wide; suitable transfer; 4 skeins 
each of stranded fast-colour cotton in blue, 
pink, mauve and green. 

Finished Size. 

18 inches by 25 inches. 

Lace edging 1 inches without small edg 
ing. Work for 18 inches in width and 25 
inches in length to join to cloth. 
To Make. 

Draw 3 to 4 threads to size, i.e. (18 
inches in width and 25 inches in length). 
Fold over border to form J-iuch hem and 
hemstitch. 

To Hemstitch: After drawing the 
threads, fold over hem to width required 
and tack to outer edge of drawn thread 
line. 

To work the stitching join thread to 
underneath of edge of hem and oversew 
for 3 sts. Now pick up 3 or 4 threads 
immediately below, pull through thread 
and g o back into same place as before but 
this time put needle into the hem immedi 
ately, above the position from which it 
previously came out. Proceed likewise to 
end of row. Buttonhole stitch around 
corners, as by drawing threads both ways 
you would have an open square in each 
corner. 

Work the inside edge likewise. 

Press well under a damp cloth 
and warm iron on wrong side. 

Press transfer on cloth 
and, using three strands of 
the cotton at a time, 
commence to em 
broider, keep 
ing sts. exactly 



6th 

spaces. 

7th 
block, 

8th 



row 2 



row 4 

1 space, 

row 1 

1 block 



O-jjjij-O- 

blocks, 5 

spaces, 

1 block. 

block, 



3 spaces, 
spaces, 1 



1 block. 

block, 

1 space. 

pat. 



spaces, 

9th row 2 
block, 3 spaces, 

10th row 1 
spaces, 1 block, 

These 10 rows form 

Work corner: 

1st row 1 block, 5 spaces, 1 block. 

2nd row 5 spaces, 1 block, 1 space. 

3rd row 2 spaces, 1 block, 4 spaces. 

4th row 3 spaces, 1 block, 3 spaces. 

5th row 4 spaces, 1 block, 2 spaces. 

6th row 1 space, 1 block, 5 spaces. 

7th row 6 spaces, 1 block. 

Now turn with 5 ch. 1st row of corner turn and 
work into edge of last 7 rows as follows: 1 space, 
1 block, 4 
spaces, 1 block. 

2nd row 1 







Gsmmerice 





4 treble = 1 block, 

2 ch., I tr. in 3 ch. = 1 spai 



the size of the pat 
tern and finishing 
off neatly at l>;ick. 
(No knots, either for 
joining or finishing 1 ; run 
in ends for at least an in-.-li). 

On completion press on the 
wrong side under a damp cloth and 
warm iron. 

To Make the Edging. 

Commence with 22 ch. 1 inches in length. 

1st row Turn with 3 ch. for first treble, 

3 tr., to complete first block 5 spaces (of 
2 ch.. 1 tr. into 3rd ch.) 1 block. 

2nd row Turn with 3 ch. (when work 
ing tr. beg. of row and 5 ch. when working 
1 space at beg 1 , of row), complete 1 block, 

4 spaces, 1 block, 1 space. 

3rd row Turn with 5 ch., 2 spaces, 1 
block, 3 spaces, 1 block. 

4th row 1 block, 2 spaces, 1 block, 3 
spaces. 

6th row 4 spaces, 1 block, 1 space, 1 
blok. 















block, 3 spaces, 
1 block, 2 
spaces. 

Pattern 
should now be easy to follow from chart. 

Continue all around likewise. Join with 
a s.s. Now work 3 ch. over first tr. * 1 






d.c. into next 
tr., 3 ch., re 
peat from * to 
end, working an 
extra 3 ch., 1 d.c., 
3 ch. into corners 
to turn. Join with s.s. 
and work 3 ch., 1 d.c. 
into each 3 ch. of pre 
vious round, working an extra 
3 ch., 1 d.c., 3 ch. into each 
corner to turn. Join with s.s. 
and fasten off end. 

To Finish, 

Join on the straight with a row 
of slip sts. (i.e., insert hook as for 
any other st. and pull thread right 
through). Work likewise into eacii ch. Run 
in end. 

Join neatly to edge of cloth by over 
sewing or, if preferred, faggot stitch to 
edge. 

Press well under a damp cloth and warm 
iron. 

To work small edging around crochet: 
Join to first space at centre. 3 ch. for first 
tr., then * 2 ch., 1 tr. into next space. 
Repeat from * to last space of same side. 
Work 1 extra tr. right into corner with 
3 ch. either side to turn. 



30 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




Smart women everywhere insist on the 
gentle, safe protection of soft Modess. 
They know it is the one sanitary naplcin that affords 
complete comfort with absolute peace of mind. 

MODESS the sale, sure, 
economical sanitary naplcin. 

Modess is at chemists and 
stores everywhere. 

A Product of 

JOHNSON 4 JOHNSON 
WORLD S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF SURGICAL DRESSINGS 




/?e-v/fo//se your Sco/p 

Lifeless Hoir denotes your scalp needs 
twice-a-day massage with KOKO. which 
clanses the scalp and promotes the 
growth of healthy hair KOKO, the 
famous British Hair Preparation, it free 
from oil, grease and dye. 

Ask your Chemist for 

KOKO 

- FOR THE HAIR 



"Iron Starvation" 
often the cause of lack 
of energy, anaemia and 
that run-down feeling. 
Iron "Jelloids" provide, 
in an easy-to-take form, 
the iron needed te build 
up rich, red blood. 



Iron 
Jell oids 




*Zkle-1ree Teething 

No need for trouble at teething 
timel Give baby Steedman s Pow 
ders to keep habits regular and the 
bloodstream cool. These famous 
powders are a safe and gentle 
aperient which have been used by 
Mothers for over 100 years. For 
trouble-free teething 



STEEDMANiS 
POWDERS 

ON SALE AT ALL CHEMISTS 

063 IB 




(<fjjjf long and colourful lilo 



/ 



/ 



Sewing Hints: Always use double thread 
for gathering. Always use as fine a thread 
and needle as the garment will allow. When 
threading your needle make the knot on the 
end broken from the reel. The rule for 
frilling is one and a quarter the length of 
the edge to be trimmed. In facing a sleeve, 
turn it, and place the facing inside the 
sleeve before sewing it on. Gathers should 
always be set on the right side, but never 
with a needle; use a large pin. When sew 
ing on a button, place the knot on the 
right side of the cloth directly under the 
button. In sewing a seam, put the stitches 
closely together, but lightly, into the cloth, 
being careful not to pull the thread tight, 
as this causes the seam to draw. 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



31 



Oakleaf Crochet Centre and Doyley 

-oIHx Why Not Make a Start on Your Christmas Presents Now ? 



Materials: Coats Mercer Croohet Cotton 
No. 40 (colour, ecru) ; steel crochet needle 
No. 4f 

Abbreviations: Ch., chain; d.c., double 
crochet; tr., treble; l.tr., long treble; pic., 
picot; bet., between; st.-st., slip-stitch; 
bg., beginning; rep., repeat; s.c., single 
crpchet; tog., together; pet., petal; sp., 
space: lp., loop. 

Leaves. 

15 ch., miss the first ch. by the needle 
and work 13 consecutive d.c., 3 d.c. in end 
stitch by the tag of the cotton and 13 d.c. 
down the opposite side of the ch., also 
3 d.c. in the next st. (which becomes the 
top of the leaf). Consecutive 13 d.c. along 
the stitches of the first side. 

Now turn the work, 3 ch., miss 1 d.c., 
working into back thread of previous row. 
Work 13 d.c. down side, 3 d.c. in st. at top, 
13 d.c. down, opposite side, turn.* 3 ch. 
Working into back thread of previous row 
miss 1 st., work 13 d.c. in stitches down 
side, 3 d.c. in st. at top, 13 d.c. down 
opposite side *, turn. Rep. from * to * 
twice. Fasten off. Join one leaf to an 
other before fastening off, or, if preferred, 
join by sewing them together. 

There are 36 leaves. 

Centre Rings. 

12 ch., join in a ring, 3 ch. to stand for 
1 tr., make 27 tr. into ring, join by sl.-st. 
in 3rd ch., making 28 tr. in all. 

2nd round 4 ch., 1 tr. with 1 ch. bet. on 



every tr. of last round. Join by sl-.st. in 
3rd ch. of 4 ch. at beg., making 28 spaces 
in all. 

3rd round <Sl.-st. into 1st sp., * 3 ch., 1 
tr. in next sp., 1 pic. (4 ch., sl.-st. into 1st 
ch.), 3 ch., 1 d.c. into next sp.* Rep. from 

* to * all round sl.-st. into 1st ch. of 3 ch. 
at beg. 

Make five more rings, joining 3 pics, to 
3 pics, of previous ring. 

1st round of Centre Join thread to 1st 
pic. of end ring, 8 ch. (3 ch. to stand for 
treble), 1 tr. in next pic. *, 5 ch., 1 tr. in 
next pic v *. Rep. from * to * to last pic. 
of ring, 5 ch., 1 l.tr. bet. pics., joining rings, 
5 ch., 1 tr. in 1st pic. of next ring.**. 
(4 ch., 1 tr.) in each of next 3 pics., 5 ch., 
1 l.tr. in pic. bet. rings, 5 ch., 1 tr. in 1st 
pic. of next ring.**. Rep. from ** to ** 
till 1st pic. of end ring. Rep. from * to ** 
till 1st pic. of 1st ring. Join by sl.-st. 
into 3rd ch. of 8 ch. at beg. 

2nd round 6 d.c. in every 5 ch. lp., 5 
d.c. in every 4 ch. lp. 

3rd round 5 ch., * miss 1 st., 1 tr. in 
next st., 2 ch. * Rep. from * to * all round 
end ring, then **, miss 2 sts., 1 tr. in next 
St., 2 ch. **. Rep. from ** to ** till 1st. 
tr. in the 1st pic. of last ring. Rep. from 

* to *. Join (138 sp.). 

4th round Sl.-st. into 1st sp., 5 ch., 1 tr. 
in same sp., leaving last lp. on needle. 
Make 1 tr. in next sp., taking last 3 Ips. off 
needle tog. *, 2 ch., 1 tr. in same sp., leav 



ing last lp. on needle, 1 tr. in next sp., 
taking 3 last Ips. off needle tog. Rep. from 
* to * all round. Join. 

5th and 6th rounds Same as 4th round. 

7th round Sl.-st. back to sp. correspond 
ing with sp. over 1st pic. of 1st ring *, 3 
d.c. in every sp. till last pic. of same ring, 
2 d.c. in every sp. till ring at other end *. 
Rep. from * to *. Join. 

8th round 6 ch. to stand for 1st l.tr., 2 
l.tr. into 1st ch., leaving last lp. of each 
l.tr. on needle and drawing all through 
tog. This forms one pet.; 6 ch., 1 pet. into 
top of 1st pet., miss 6 sts., 1 d.c. into 7th 
d.c. Rep. all round. Join. 

9th round Sl.-st. back to centre of pets., 
4 ch. to stand for 1 l.tr., 2 l.tr. in 1st ch., 
leaving last lp. of each l.tr. on needle and 
drawing all through tog.; 6 ch., 1 pet. in 
same st. *, 1 pet., 6 ch., 1 pet. in centre 
loop of pets, in previous round. * Rep. 
from * to * all round. Join to 1st pet. by 
sl.-st. (48 daisies). 

10th round 8 d.c. in every lp., 1 d.c. 
bet. each pet. 

llth round 1 d.c. in every st. of last 
round, crocheting into back of sts. only. 

12th round * 1 d.c. into every at. to 
centre of lp.; join leaf with a d.c. into 
point of leaf, 1 d.c. in every st. to next lp., 
a pic. bet. Ips. * Rep. from * to * till 
there are 12 leaves joined to centre.** 
1 d.c. in every st. to centre of next lp., a 

[Turn to page 33.] 




32 



Australian Home Journal, November 



949 




Youtblyne girdles by Bcrlei are a cunning 
blend of lovely elasticised and rigid materials, 
pre-tested and cleverly cut to give perfect 
sbaping and support witb undreamed-of free 
dom and flexibility. 1 bere s a "Youtblyne" 
for Mother as well as Daughter ... for most 
figure types in fact, from the very slim to tbe 
"not-so-very." Prices range from 38/- to 7 \/- . 

Ask always for a personal fitting. 
your assurance of perfect fit. 

makes milady s torso 

even more so 





The Play and Film 

[From page 27.] 

Judy Garland, who has been in ill-health 
for some time past, is now completely re 
covered. She was very run down when 
ordered into hospital, but is now "in the 
pink," lias added 12 Ibs. to her weight, 
and M-G-M will put her into another pic 
ture immediately. 

* * * 

The reported visit of Danny Kaye to 
Australia next year is good news. He has 
been a tremendous success in London. When 
he was signed on for the Palladium seats 
were booked out long before he was listed 
to appear. His first great success was at 
this theatre. At a big official dinner 
Danny spoke right from his heart about 
British audiences: "I used to think that the 
British were cold, reserved and unemo 
tional. That was before I knew them, r he 
said. "I can only say that I have never 
met such sincerity, such enthusiasm, and 
such deep emotion." This was not Danny s 
first visit. He came to Britain some time 
before the war and appeared at a Park 
Lane cabaret. His reception was definitely 
cold and he never forgot a miserable man 
in the front row of tables who kept his 
back turned on the show almost all the 
time. 

* * 

The next picture in which Greer Garson 
will appear is "Mr. Imperium," a charming 
story of a girl who falls in love with a 
king. Greer is ordered out of the country 
a Balkan State, of course when it is 
discovered that a mere commoner and the 
king are having a romance. Greer goes to 
Hollywood and becomes a great picture 
star. Quick work! Then the king, like a 
lot of other kings, loses his throne and 
also makes for Hollywood, using the name 
"Mr. Imperium," from which the film gets 
its title. The king and the star take up 
their romance again, and the industrious 
little star gets him back his throne. 

* * 

Film directors are not thought of kindly 
in quite a number of quarters. One critic 
avers they get their jobs through sixty per 
cent, luck, thirty-nine per cent, influence 
and one per cent, ability. "Technicians 
are skilled folk, but the man in charge is 
so often a dud." Just a nice kindly opinion 
seasoned with salt and vinegar. 



Are you watching others {ret 
ting: a lot of fun out of life? 
Pun which you miss because of 
continual listlessness and 
frayed nerves. Why miss these 
Joys of life? By taking 
W1NCARNIS you can build 
yourself up and gain a 
natural zest for living. That 
is what WINCARNIS is for. It 
is a tonic with wonderful re 
cuperative powers a skilful 
blending of choice wines with 
other strength-giving elements 
to fortify the brain and nerves 
and generally tone up the 
system, 

WINCARNIS has helped count- 
Jess nervy, run-down men and 
women to regain natural buoy 
ant health and vigour, as thou 
sands of recommendations from 
the medical profession testify. 
It will do YOU good, too. Start 
now taking WINCARNIS. Ask 
your Chemist for a bottle of 
WINCAHN1S ... the Wine of 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



33 



You remember "Spring in Park Lane"? 
Well, there has been another success in 
London, "Maytime in Mayfair," built on 
somewhat similar lines, which will be 
shown in Australia early in the new year. 
Setting is in an exclusive London fashion 
house which Michael Wilding inherits. 
Anna Neagle is the designer and business 
head. You can guess ahead what is going 
to happen, but before the happy ending 
and the wedding a deal of water flowers 
under the bridge. Michael has a rival, a 
first rate cad and mischief-maker who has 
got to be courteously but effectively dealt 
with. Then one must .admire Michael s 
irresponsible wooing and Anna s cold recep 
tion (which gradually thaws) of his ad 
vances. Of course there are fashion par 
ades and dreamy dances. A satisfying, 
well-dressed film, with a good story and 
plenty of glamour. 

* * 

Kathryn Grayson can sing a note higher 
than a flute can register. If you doubt it, 
listen to her sing in "That Midnight Kiss." 

* * * 

Lewis Stone has been a film star since 
1915. Twenty-five of those years he has 
been with M-G-M. 

* * * 
Elizabeth Taylor and her young star 

colleagues have their lessons at the famous 
M-G-M schoolhousc a bungalow on the lot 
which was once John Gilbert s private 
dressing room. 

* * * 

Eight of Metro s best-known male stars 
Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Mickey 
Rooney, Frank Morgan, Robert Taylor, 
Walter Pidgeon. Lewis Stone and Lionel 
Barrymore pile up among them the stagger 
ing aggregate of 140 years stardom with 
Leo. Gable, who made his first M-G-M film 
in 1930, is to-day at the peak of his career 
with the same company. 
*--#- 

Black Eye: If a blow has been received 
sufficient to break the minute blood-vessels 
under or around the eye, there will be an 
effusion of blood beneath the skin, and a 
dark spot or ring will result. The applica 
tion of very hot water will contract the 
blood-vessels, cause the absorption of the 
blood, and relieve soreness. Never use 
cold water or ice on a "black eye." Raw 
beef steak may be applied, but hot water 
is better. 



One of the chief difficulties encountered 
with garments or other articles that are 
not subjected to the routine of the weekly 
wash is the tendency to put off washing 
until considerable soil has accumulated. 
This is a mistake, for the severe treatment 
necessary to remove deeply-imbedded soil 
or perspiration is harder on the fabric than 
any number of gentle washings. A good 
slogan for all fine fabrics would be, "Wash 
frequently and gently." 



KNITTED AND CROCHET TOYS. 
We have published a booklet which 
will be appreciated by those interested in 
knitted and crochet toys. Full instructions 
and illustrations are given for the follow 
ing: The Duck; A Cuddlesome Pup; Our 
Fluffy Lamb; Christmas Doll Set, compris 
ing Coat, Dress, Bootees, Bonnet, Singlet 
and Pilchers; Eddie, the Elephant; Knitted 
Lamb; Jumbo in Crochet; Poodle Purse; 
Humpty Dumpty; Mickey Mouse. The 
ideal instruction book for toy-makers and 
Red Cross workers. Send I/- postal note 
for a copy. 



Oakleaf Crochet Centre 
and Doyley 

[From page 31.] 

pic., 1 d.c. in every st. to centre of next lp., 
join a leaf.** Rep. from ** to ** twice, 
1 d.c. in every st. to centre of next lp., 
join leaf. T 1 d.c. in every st. to centre 
of next lp., 1 pic., 1 d.c. in every st. to 
centre of next lp., join leaf. T. liep. from 
T to T twice, 1 d.c. ih every st. to next lp., 

1 pic. bet. Rep. from beg. of round. 
13th round Rings 8 ch., join into a 

ring. 

1st and 2nd rounds Same as large ring, 
making only 26 tr. in ring and 26 sps. 

3rd round" Sl.st. into 1st sp., 5 ch.. 1 d.c. 
in next sp., 2 ch., 1 tr. in next sp., 1 pic., 

2 ch., 1 d.c. in next sp., 2 ch., 1 tr. in next 
sp., 1 pic., 2 ch., 1 d.c. in next sp., 2 ch., 

1 tr. in next sp., 2 ch. 

Join into lp. of leaf after centre of leaf 
with a pic., 2 ch., 1 d.c. into 
next sp.; 2 ch., 1 tr. in next 
sp. Join to 2nd lp. of same 
leaf; 2 ch., 1 d.c. in next 
sp.; 2 ch., 1 tr. in next sp. 
Join to 1st lp. of next leaf; 

2 ch., 1 d.c. in next sp.; 2 
ch., 1 tr. in next sp. Join 
to lp. before centre of leaf; 
2 ch., * 1 d.c. in next sp; 
2 ch., 1 tr., 1 pic., 2 ch. "*. 
Rep. from * to * 5 times, 1 
d.c. in next sp., 2 ch. Join 
to 2nd ch. of 5 ch. at beg., 

1 pic., 3 ch; leave a length 
of thread to join to last 
ring. 

In the following rings, 
after 5 ch., 1 d.c. in 1st. sp. 
at beg., join next 2 pics, 
to 2 pics, of previous ring 
before poining to leaf. At 
the finish, after 3 ch., join 
to top of tr. (not into pic.) 
of previous ring. Fasten 
off. Rings should measure 
about 1 inch in diameter. 

Border rings are worked 
the same, joining rings tog. 
by only 2 pic; omit 3 ch. 
leave 4 pics, on inner side, 
side free. 

14th round Join cotton bet. rings, 9 
ch., * 1 d.c. into 1st of the three centre 
pics, of ring; 5 ch., 1 d.c. in centre pic.; 
5 ch., 1 d.c. in 3rd pic.; 5 ch., 11 tr. bet. 
rings; 5 ch. *. Rep. from * to * all round. 
Join to 4 ch. 

15th round 6 d.c. into every lp. all 
round. Join. 

16th round 5 ch., * 1 tr. in centre of lp.; 

2 ch., 1 tr. bet. Ips.; 2 ch. *. Rep. from 
* to * all round. Join to 3rd ch. 

17th and 18th rounds Same as 4th round. 

19th round Same as 7th round. 

20th and 21st rounds Same as 8th and 
9th rounds. 

22nd round 7 d.c. in every lp., 1 d.c. 
bet. pets. 

23rd round 5 ch., * miss 2 sts., 1 tr., 
2 ch. *. Rep. from * to * all round. Join 
to 3rd ch. 

24th, 25th and 26th rounds Same as 4th 
round. 

27th round 3 d.c. in every lp. 

28th round Same as llth round. 

29th round * 1 d.c. in 1st 5 sts. Join 
1st pic. of ring with a pic.; 5 d.c. Join 
next pic. with a d.c., 5 d.c. Join next pic. 
with 1 d.c., 5 d.c. Join next pic. with a 



pic *. Rep. from 
are joined. 



to * till all rings (47) 



OAKLEAF DOYLEY. 

Rings and leaves are woijced same as in 
centre. 

Make one large ring join thread to 1st 
pic. 

1st round 1 d.c. in every pic., with 5 ch. 
bet. Join. 

2nd round fi d.c. in every loop. 

3rd round 5 ch., 3 ch. to stand for 1 
tr., * miss 1 st., 1 tr.; in next st. 2 ch. *. 
Rep. from * to * all round. Join into 3rd 
ch. #t beg. (42 spaces). 

4th, 5th and 6th rounds Same as 4th, 
5th and 6th rounds in centre. 

7th round 4 d.c. in every space. 

8th, 9th, 10th and llth rounds Same as 
8th, 9th, 10th and llth rounds in centre 
(24 daisies). 

12th round Join leaves, 1 d.c. in every 




pics, on outer 



st. to centre of loop. Join leaf with 1 d.c. 
into point of leaf; 1 d.c. in every st. to 
next loop. Make a pic. bet. loops. Rep. 
till all leaves are joined (24). 

13th round Rings are worked and joined 
same as small rings joined to leaves iii 
centre (24). 



Teen-age Fashions. 

An increasing number of women are get 
ting their ideas of new fashion styles from 
the dresses worn by the film stars, and in 
this connection the exponent of the soft, 
feminine look is Helen Rose, who received 
plaudits for her charming teen-age gowns 
in "A Date with Judy" and "Luxury 
Liner." Miss Rose s most recent assign 
ment is "The Stratton Story", for which 
she creates a chic wardrobe for June 
Allyson. 

Many of our current fashions have 
stemmed from elaborate costume films. In 
this connection we owe much to noted 
period designer Walter Plunkett, who 
scores one of his biggest successes with 
"Little Women." 

It is safe to predict that the gowns worn 
by the stars in the film will capture the 
imagination of the public and that the 
new summer styles will echo the quaint 
mid-Victorian charm of Plunkett s designs. 



34 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



"For tasty, Nourishing 

* Sandwiches . . . REMEMBER 

KRAFT CHEESE" 



Soya ELIZABETH COOKE, 

Kraft Cookery and 

NUTRITION EXPERT. 





INDOORS... 

Lunch should always be an 
important meal. It should 
be tasty and nourishing. So 
remember Kraft Cheese for 
Dad s sandwiches and also 
for those teen-age sons and 
daughters of yours. 



OUTDOORS . 



Nourishing, sustaining food 
is vital for outdoor workers. 
If your husband works* out 
doors he needs good body 
building food, so give him 
Kraft Cheese it s rich in 
proteins, Vitamins A, 62 and 
D, plus the valuable milk 
minerals, calcium and phos 
phorus. 



Kraft Cheese saves you money 




No waste, no rind with Kraft 
Cheese. You enjoy every 
delicious slice of this mellow 



cheddar cheese because it 
stays fresh to the last in its 
hygienic foil wrapper. 




Tastes better 

because It s 
BLENDED BETTER 



KRAFT CHEESE 



C98 




BRITISH-MADE 

BEBARFALD-VICKERS 
BUREAU SEWING MACHINES 



A truly magnificent 
machine. The English Vickers Head 
sewa both backwards and forwards. 
Other special features include Auto 
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and Tension Control. Handsome 
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Maple colour. 

--- CUT AND MAIL THIS COUPON --- 

BEBARFALDS LTD., 

Cnr. George & Park Sts., SYDNEY 

Please forward full details of the "Bebarfald- 

Vickers" Bureau Sewing Machine, with details 

of your Specialised Easy Terms. 



NAME. 



ADDRESS. 



JI.H.J. 



119 



BEBARFALDS 

OPPOSITE SYDNEY TOWN HALL 



DRINK HABIT 
DESTROYED 

Do you suffer through the curse of 
excessive drinking? EUCRASY has 
changed homes from misery and 
want to happiness again. Established 
52 years it destroys all desire for 
Alcohol. Harmless, tasteless, can be 
given secretly or taken voluntarily. 
State which required. 

SEND 20/- FULL TWENTY 

DAYS COURSE. 
DEPT. B, EUCRASY CO. 

297 Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



ARE YOU OVERWEIGHT? 

To be overweight is both unhealthy and un 
lovely makes you look years older. Get rid 
of it by my perfect method no dieting, no irk 
some exercises. The sum of l/10/- covers the 
whole cost: no further expense. Slimness 
estored, no matter how long the "fat" condition. 
Send 6d. in stamps for full particulars to 
MATRON MARION GOSS, Dept. J, 
Box 32, P.O., North Sydney, N.S.W. 



When milk puddings stick to the pie- 
dish, swish in a little hot water, turn upside 
down so it will steam and it will clean 

iasily. 



Australian Home Journal, November 1 , 1 949 



35 




For a very special evening the following 
recipes are just the thing. All are economi 
cal, simple to make, and most attractive 
when complete. Try any one of them; all 
are illustrated in our picture, in the order 
of recipes printed clockwise direction. 



Lemon Doughnuts. 

5 ozs. flour, 1^ teaspoonsful baking pow 
der, ^ teaspoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful 
grated lemon rind, 3 teaspoonsful lemon 
juice, 3 tablespoonsful sugar, 1 egg, 2 tea- 
spoonsful melted fat or cooking oil, 1-2 
tablespoonsful water. 

Sift flour with baking powder and salt. 
Stir in lemon rind. Beat sugar and egg 
together till light, then stir in fat or oil 
and lemon juice. Stir in flour gradually, 
and add just enough water to make a light, 
Tollable dough. 

Boll out on a lightly-floured board to 
about i-in. thick. Cut into rings with two 
floured cutters 3 ins. and 1^ ins. in dia 
meter. Cut the large round first and leave 
it in the dough while you cut and remove 
the centre. Round or oval cutters can be 
used if preferred. 

Heat a pan of deep fat or enough fat to 
give a depth of about 1^ ins. in the frying- 
pan. It should be almost smoking hot. 
Drop the rings in gently, one at a time, and 
cook only about three together so that the 
heat of the fat is not too reduced. 

As the rings rise to the surface, turn 
them over so that both sides brown. Cook 
for about 2 minutes, then drain on brown 
paper. Dredge with sugar. 

If the fat is too hot, doughnuts will be 
over-cooked on the outside and under 
done at the centre; if not hot enough, they 
will be heavy and greasy. These dough 
nuts are best eaten on day of making. 



Pear Ginger Cake. 

4 ozs. flour, 1 teaspoonful ground cinna 
mon, teaspoonful ground ginger, tea- 
spoonful ground mace, J teaspoonful salt, 

1 teaspoonful bicarbonate of soda, 2 ozs. 
brown sugar, 3 tablespoonsful golden syrup, 

2 ozs. lard or cooking fat or 2J tablespoons 
ful cooking oil, 1 egg, 3-4 tablespoonsful 
milk or milk and water, ^ oz. butter, 1 oz. 
white sugar, 6 halves of cooked pears. 

Mix flour with spices, salt and soda, then 



sift together twice to make sure that soda 
is evenly distributed. Heat brown sugar, 
fat or oil and syrup till fat is melted and 
syrup thinned. Cool slightly, then stir 
gradually into flour. 

Beat egg till light, then stir into mixture. 
Add liquid, using just enough to make a 
loose, pouring batter. 

Choose an 8^-inch sandwich tin with 
sides 1 ins. high. If a deep tin is used 
the cake may be difficult to turn out with 
out breaking; if the tin is more than |~in. 
shallower the cake may rise and spill over 
the edge. 

Place butter in the sandwich tin, then 
melt over a low heat. Stir in white sugar 
and cook to a golden brown caramel. Lay 
pear halves, centre downwards, in the 
caramel. If they are large, trim a slice off 
the rounded outer portion and wedge be 
tween halves. 

Pour batter over pears, spreading if 
necessary with a knife. Bake in a moder 
ate oven for about 45 minutes. When 
cooked, turn out at once on to a serving 
plate. If some of the caramel sticks to the 
tin, heat it gently, then reverse over cake 
so that caramel can drip on to it. 

Decorate, if liked, with mimosa balls or 
mock cream. This cake is best eaten the 
day it is baked. Some people like to serve 
it before it is cold. If any is left over, it 
makes a delicious pudding, reheated for 
about 10 minutes in the oven and served 
with custard. Well-drained tinned peaches, 
apricots or pineapple can be used in place 

of pears. . 

Catherine Wheels. 

8 ozs. flour, ^ teaspoonful baking powder, 
3 ozs. sugar, 3 ozs. margarine, lard or cook 
ing fat, 1 egg, 3 tablespoonsful milk or 
milk and water, 1 tablespoonful cocoa, ^ 
teaspoonful vanilla essence, 4 or 5 drops 
peppermint, essence, J teaspoonful green 
colouring, 5 or 6 drops raspberry essence, 
5 or 6 drops cochineal or carmine. 

Sift flour with baking powder. Mix in 
sugar, then rub in fat. Divide into three 
equal portions either by weighing or meas 
uring. Beat egg and milk together. 

Into first portion stir the cocoa, then 
measure in about 2J tablespoonsful of the 
milk and egg mixture, then add the vanilla. 
Chocolate part needs a little more liquid 



than the other two. Knead to a 
smooth paste. 

Mix into the second portion about 
If tablespoonsful milk and egg, pep 
permint essence and green colouring 
and to the third portion add remain 
der of liquid, raspberry essence and 
red colouring. 

Eoll out each portion separately 
on a lightly-floured board into a 
rectangle about $ in. thick. Lay 
chocolate on green, then pink on top. 
Eoll up tightly like a Swiss roll, 
brushing the end with a little water. 
Put in a cold place for about an hour 
to firm, so that it can be easily sliced 
without spoiling the shape. 

Cut into slices about in. thick. 
Bake on lightly-greased baking 
sheets in a moderate oven for about 
25 minutes. 



Date Chews. 

4 ozs. stoned dates, 2 ozs. shelled 
walnuts, 1 oz. rolled oats, 3 ozs. flour, 
1 teaspoonful baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoonful ground cinnamon, 5 ozs. 
sugar, 3 tablespoonsful water. 

Put dates, nuts and oats through 
the mincing machine, or chop very 
finely. Sift flour, baking powder and cin 
namon. Stir in sugar, then date mixture. 
Stir in water. 

When batter is well mixed, drop on to a 
lightly-greased baking sheet from a tea 
spoon into small heaps well apart. Bake 
in a fairly slow oven till set and lightly 
browned, which will take about 25 minutes. 
Cool chews on a cake rack. When cold 
they will be hard and crisp but -will become 
chewy after about 24 hours. Store in tin. 



Truffle Tartlets. 

4$ ozs. flour, 1J ozs. castor sugar, 3 ozs. 
fat, 1 oz. soya flour, 1 oz. semolina, 1 
rounded tablespoonful cocoa, 2 tablespoons 
ful white sugar, 1 teaspoonful baking 
powder, 1 oz. margarine, } teaspoonful 
vanilla essence, few drops rum flavouring 
if liked, 6 tablespoonsful water. 

Mix flour with castor sugar, then rub in 
fat. Knead well, then roll out on a lightly- 
floured board to & in. thick. Line ungreased 
tartlet tins with this shortbread dough. 

Sift soya flour, semolina, cocoa, white 
sugar and baking powder together. Beat 
margarine to a cream, then stir in dry in 
gredients. Stir in liquid and flavouring 
and when well mixed spread evenly in 
lined tartlet tins, filling two-thirds full. 

Bake in a moderate oven for abouj 30 
minutes, when shortbread edge should be 
light gold and filling set. Turn out care 
fully and cool on a cake rack. Handle 
tartlets with care or shortbread may break. 

Decorate with a band of plain white 
icing; These tartlets are best if stored in 
a tin for 24 hours before serving. 



Animal Snaps. 

2 ozs. cooking fat, lard or margarine; 2} 
ozs. sugar; 2 tablespoonsful syrup, 1 table- 
spoonful treacle; 1 egg; 7 ozs. plain flour; 
i teaspoonful ground cinnamon; 1^-2 tea- 
spoonsful ground ginger; $ teaspoonful bi 
carbonate of soda; i teaspoonful salt. 

Work fat with a wooden spoon till soft, 
then beat in sugar. Stir in syrup and 
treacle, then add about a third of the 
lightly beaten egg. 

Sift flour with spices, soda and salt, 
twice for preference. Add part of dry in 
gredients to fat mixture, then beat well. 

[Turn to page 36.] 



36 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




PARIS 



never 



did anything like this . 



Paris gate a prize of a golden apple 

to one woman, the goddess Aphrodite irhom 

he j/tdged to be the most beautiful 

oj three goddesses. 

To-day Life Assurance offers a valuable prize to every woman 
the prize of security for herself and her children. By placing 
part of their savings with our free and independent Life 
Assurance Offices, three million Australians are providing a 
prize for themselves or their dependants. And the women of 
Australia have been largely instrumental in the development 
of this outstanding social force. In doing this they have not 
only made their own future secure, they have encouraged the 
development of Australia as a whole. 

\ 

EVERY AUSTRALIAN BENEFITS 
BY THE ACTIVITIES OF OUR FREE AND INDEPENDENT 



E 



ISSUED BY THE LEADING LIFE ASSURANCE OFFICES IN AUSTRALIA 



Jar a Special Jreal 

[From page 35.1 

Stir in remainder of egg and flour alter 
nately till both are used up and dough is 
well blended. Set in a cold place for about 
i hour to firm. 

Sprinkle board or marble slab lightly 
with flour, then roll out dough to about 
J in. thick. Cut into shapes with floured 
animal or ordinary cutters. 

Place on lightly greased baking slides. 
Bake in a moderately hot oven for 10-12 
minutes till rich golden brown. Cool on a 
cake rack. Ice with coloured glace icing, 
if liked, when cold. If these snaps are 
stored in an air-tight tin or glass jar they 
will keep fresh and crisp for days. 



DIAMOND YOKE JUMPER 

{From page 15."] 

a knit row, see that the wool to be woven 
lies over the working wool when drawing 
it through to make your stitch. Knit the 
next stitch. When working a purl row, see 
that the second colour lies behind the 
working wool when taking this round the 
needle to make a purl stitch. Then purl 
the next stitch. 



* 



Seguiiied Hood and Capelet. 
For the evening parties which will be 
coming on, what could be a more attrac 
tive gift than the glamorous hood covered 
with sequins? Made out of velvet it would 
look very rich ; a satin or soft wool would 
also look quite effective. 




Cut the capelet collar, as diagram E, in 
paper, fitting it round neck rather loosely. 
Line both and join hood to cape, gathering 
the hood at side back, as sketches B and C. 
Dot here and there with sequins and add 
two diamante or gold buttons at neck. 
You will be delighted with the effect. 

First cut out a paper pattern similar to 
sketch D. Maybe you have a "hooded 
coat with a different style hood which you 
like. Well, if so, cut a pattern from that. 



Australian Home Journal, November I, 1949 



37 



Lace and Broderie Jabots. 
Always an acceptable gift a fresh lace 
jabot. You no doubt have some good scraps 
of lace or hroderie anglais, not enough for 
lingerie but enough to make a little smart 
jabot. Sketched are a few suggestions. 




^"* \,- J ^^ * 



Sketch A shows four pattern pieces of 
broderie which look most effective sewn on 
tape and arranged as a barrister s tabs: 
another pattern piece or full cuffs to match, 
at sketch C. Another charming and effec 
tive style is the collar and jabot in 
sketch B; cut a collar pattern out in paper 
and sew rows of val lace round and round, 
and add a set of frills of val lace to form 
a jabot. Sketch D shows a very neat and 
exquisite little jabot made of just two 
patterns of lovely lace; add a velvet~T>ow 
to finish. E features a square collar and 
cuff set of broderie anglais which is also a 
useful gift. 

-- 
Good Food Combinations. 

Roast mutton should be served with red 
currant jelly, or some piquant jam, such as 
gooseberry, if the joint is the leg; if it is 
the shoulder give it onion sauce. Or for 
any form of roast mutton there is the 
French extra of a thick border of fresh 
watercress. 

Mince is all the nicer for fried sippets of 
bread and a border of mashed potatoes. 
And a suspicion of chutney will also im 
prove it. 

Curries of any sort need the right sort 
of boiled rice, and some raisins. 

Liver needs fried bacon and slices of cut 
lemon. 

Boiled bacon is good with broad beans 
anl parsley sauce. 

Roast fowl demands good bread sauce 
and fried bacon, as well as brown gravy. 

Boiled fowl is served with egg or parsley 
sauce and boiled bacon. 

Boiled rabbit should have pickled pork 
or boiled bacon and onion sauce. 

Roast rabbit requires forcemeat balls, 
brown gravy, and a herb stuffing. 



THROW OFF 



PIMPLES, BLACKHEADS are UGLY FEATURES 

Refined Folk Avoid Your Acquaintance 
I tell readers of this Journal free how to remove blemishes in ten days 

Stubborn cases that baffled physicians and beautv 
specialists have been cured You have ru-v^r used or 
heard of anything like it Makes muddy cc.mp ! :: 
red spots, pimples, blackheads, eruptions, vani.ih 
almost like magic. No cream, lotion, enamel, aalve 
plaster, bandage, mask, massage, diet or apparatus, 
nothing to swallow. It doesn t matter if your con- 
plexion is a "fright," whether your fsce is full of muddy 
spots, peppery blackheads, embarrassing pimples and 
eruptions or if your skin is rou-Jiri and "porey," and 
vou ve tried almost everything under t!ie sun to get 
rid of the blemishes. This wonderful treatment, in mst 
ten days, positively removes every blemish, and beau 
tifies your skin in a marvellous way. You look vears 
vounger. It gives the skin the bloom, tint and purity 
of a freshly blown rose. In ten days you can b- the 
subject of wild admiration by vour friends, no matter 
what your age. 

ALL METHODS NOW KNOWN ARE CAST ASIDE 

There is nothing to wear, nothing to take internally. Your face, even arms, hands, shoulders are 
beautified beyond your fondest drepms AM this I will absolutHv prove to you before your own eyes 
in your mirror in ten days. This treatment is absolutely harmless to the most delicate skin, and 
very pleasant to use No change in your mode of living necessary A few minutes daily does it. 
To every reader of this Journal I will give full details of this really astounding treatment. Let me 
how you You risk nothing. Send me 4d in stamps, your name and address, and I will give 
vou full details. 

MISS GRACE DUNCAN (Suite H8), BOX 4138 G.P.O., SYDNEY 

491 PITT STREET. SYDNEY 




- Genuine 



NIIL-BIUY GUITARS 

complete with the worlds easiest /^V *c- 



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HOME 



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e 

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and freight free to wherever you live. 

Here s your chance to learn to play to 
have friends, fun, extra money a career. 

JOIN THE SAMPSON 

GUITAR CLUB 

before it is booked out 

Wherever you live you ll receive your 
Guitar (as illustrated) and learn at home 
in a few woeks without previous know 
ledge of music thanks to these amazing 
lessons. Just a small deposit and 6/6 
weekly places one of these magnificent 
Guitars with Lessons in your home 
RIGHT AWAY. 



You learn at home quickly with these 
fully illustrated and simply worded lesson 
books sent by post. They are abso 
lutely foolproof. 

LIMITED SUPPLY 

Supplies of these beautiful Hill-billy 
Guitars as shown above are limited 
bound to be sold out in a few weeks. 
Intending members are advised to 
avoid delav. 



HOW TO JOIN 

Post the coupon to-day for full particulars. 
This places you under no obligatioa. You ll 
receive free details of the Guitars, the 
Lessons, and payment*. But don t delay 
the supply is bound to sell out quickly. 




THE SAMPSON GUITAR CLUB, 
Dept. 16, 481 Kent St.. Box 4134 X, G.P.O., Sydney. 

Without obligation; tell me how to ; oin the Club and get my 
Guitar with lessons iar playing. I enclose 2J postage stamp. 



Name .... 
Address 



38 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




COLUMBINES 

the richest 
caramels of all! 

It s grand to know that any 
thing which tastes so delicious 
can be so good for you at the 
same time! Columbines are not 
only richer, creamier and more 
satisfying but they ar* rich in 
GLUCOSE for quick energy. 
They also contain LECITHIN 
which nourishes nerves and aids 
growth. So always ask for 
Columbines . . . made with rich 
creamy butter and pure cane sugar. 




The Great Name in Confectionery. 



Laundry Talks. 

A Sticky Iron. If, when making starch, 
you use soapy water as the foundation, 
you will have no further trouble with the 
iron sticking to the article you are launder 
ing. Allow* one tablespoonful of soap jelly 
to each quart of water, adding the desired 
amount of starch, depending upon the gar 
ments to be starched. 

Clean Curtains. To anyone living in a 
smoky city, the problem of keeping the 
curtains clean is a difficult one. In my 
apartment I have solved the difficulty by 
having all my curtains of the same material 
and made identically the same, always 
keeping on hand one extra pair of curtains. 
Each week I put the pair of curtains which 
is soiled the most into the wash, hanging 
up the extra pair in its place. To simplify 
the laundering, I have two e:tra curtain 
rods in the laundry, each of which is six 
feet long, or over twice the width of one 
curtain. After washing, the curtains are 
stre%ched by hanging from one rod while 
the other is run through the bottom hems. 
In this way, the curtains dry easily, and 
by following the above plan my curtains 
are always clean and unwrinkled, my win 
dows are never bare, and there is no extra 
labor involved in laundering the curtains. 
This method of drying the curtains is 
adapted to those made of net or filet. 

Tricolette Blouses. I have a light tri- 
colette blouse which must be laundered 
often. I found it difficult to iron it nicely 
after frequent washings. Now I simply 
hang the blouse on a clean wooden rod, 
then tie the rod to the clothes line by 
means of a stout string. In the winter 
months I place the rod over the back of 
two chairs. In this manner the blouse 
dries smoothly and requires no ironing. 

Bridge Table Covers. It always proved 
a tedious task to wash my bridge table 
covers because of the many tapes attached 
to them, used in keeping the covers in 
place on the table. Now I have dispensed 
with the tapes entirely and simplified ^the 
washing of the covers by making a tiny 
square pocket on the under side of each 
corner, fastened with a snap. In each 
pocket I place a weight, which keeps the 
cover in position and can be slipped out 
when the cover is laundered. 

Clean Bedroom Curtains. Just how to 
keep the bedroom curtains from getting 
soiled and mussed at night when the win 
dows are wide open was, until recently, a 
great problem to me, but I have at last hit 
upon a simple plan. Buy spring clothes-pins 
at the local store. Two are needed for 
each window. Catch the outside and inside 
edges of both white curtain and cretonne 
drapery together, lift these to the highest 
point that can be reached along the out 
side of the curtain, and snap all together 
with a clothes-pin. It is surprising how 
fresh and clean the curtains will keep 
when you follow this procedure. 

Secrets of Success: 

Muslins of the finest make are quite easy 
to manage. Don t st>ak them, but wash 
straight away in soap lather. 

Never allow them to become so soiled 
that hard rubbing is necessary to remove 
the dirt. 

Wash in two waters, and rinse in two 
waters if the muslin is pure white, blue 
it slightly wring carefully, roll up, and 
iron after 10 minutes or so. 

Take care that your iron is not too hot: 
such fine material scorches so easily, and 



on muslin a, scorch-mark is very difficult 
to remove entirely. 

When there are stripes or spots in the 
material cotton, muslin, whatever it may 
be add a tablespoonful of vinegar to each 
quart of rinsing water. This will quite 
prevent colour running or smearing in the 
cheapest materials. 

When washing and ironing small fancy 
muslin collars, fronts, etc., remember that 
a lump of sugar in the rinsing water will 
give just a suggestion of stiffness to the 
material. 

When ironing collars, push any fulness 
up towards the band. It will not show 
there, whereas, if ironed to the edge of the 
collar, a nasty crease will result, especially 
in the case of fine muslin or silk. 

In almost every case you will find that a 
better result is obtained if you iron thin 
summer frocks; blouses, collars, etc., while 
they are qui^e damp, rather than allowing 
them to dry, damping and folding, and then 
irening. But at the same time bear in 
mind that the sun is our strongest bleach 
ing agent, and if white things are inclined 
to be a bad colour, hang them out in it 
again and again quite wet and with the 
soap left in them until the original white 
ness is restored. 



Glamorous Party Stoles. 

A lovely feminine touch for evening or 
party wear, quite the loveliest finish for a 
topless dance frock. It would be a charm 
ing gift to make. Sketch A: The frothy, 
wide scarf of tulle or net, edged with net 
frill to be worn lightly round the shoulders. 




Buy the length required; that you can 
judge for yourself, but make it at least 
2 yards long. Use the full width for scarf 
and two full widths for frill. B: A geor 
gette scarf also using the full width and 
about 2 yards long, adding about a i yard 
extra each end to turn back for little 
pockets. Turn back to X and frill in to 
pocket size. Add silk or narrow velvet 
b.ow. 

You will probably like to make one of 
these for yourself. 



If scissors are loose heat a poker red hot 
and press it on the screw, both sides. 






ife Ji*IMH 

fe ^iTii 

notls 

9-idjures 



37 Halley Street, 

FIVE DOCK. 

Dear Sirs. I am enclosing a photograph of my three sons, 
Jimmy, Tommy and Bobby, aged seven years, twenty-three 
months, and ten years. They have been given ARNOTT S 
MILK ARROWROOT BISCUITS since they were six months old 
and they are growing fine, sturdy lads. I also find them 
invaluable for school lunches and can recommend them to 
all mothers. (Signed) Mrs. G. Boland. 

There is no Substitute for Quality 



.HUNDREDS of men, women and young people have 
written to me, worried and fearful about their eyes. 
After reading the amazing free book, " Better Natural 
Sight Without Wearing Glasses," they have found that 
there is a way to regain normal vision without the need 
of glasses at all. 

My patients include men for the Navy and Air 
Force, and also men qualifying for all trades 
and professions : Civil Aviators, Civil Ser 
vants, Clerks, Motorists, Engineers, Policemen, 
Railwaymen, Engine Drivers people whose 
careers depend upon their eyes. 





Try this simple test| 
for -ASTIGMATISM. 
To the normal eye 
the width and depth 
of colour in the 
black bars of all! 
four circles are uni 
form. When astig-; 
matism exists there j 
is variation in thei 
width and depth of; 
bars. 



If you suffer from 

SHORT SIGHT LONG SIGHT 

FAILING SIGHT ASTIGMATISM 

TIRED EYES. GLARE, 

TURNED EYES 

STRAIN EYE HEADACHES 

or any other eye weakness (except 

diseased eyes) write for my BOOK 

or call for free consultation at 

EYESIGHT TRAINING 

(Ferguson System) 

Room 604H, Manchester Unity Bldg. 
185 Elizabeth St., Sydney. MA.5455 



HOW TO GET MY BOOK FREE 
Just write (enclosing 2Jd. postage) or 
call TO-DAY for 32-page Free 
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out Wearing Glasses" This includes 
testimonials from happy people who have 
discarded glasses. It will open up a new 
avenue of hope tor you. 

FREE CONSULTATION 
Ring MA 5455 for Free Consultation. 



40 



Australian Home Journal, November i, 1949 



Money-saying way fro serve fish . 




FISH SUPREME 
en CASSEROLE 

/ level tablespoon flour; % CU P 
milk; 4 ozs. Fish Supreme; 2 hard- 
cooked, sliced, eggs; 2 medium size, 
sliced tomatoes; 1 small chopped 
onion; 2 cups masked potato; 
pepper and sail. 

Mix flour to a thin paste with 2 
tablespoons of milk. Boil remaining 
milk and stir into flour gradually 
arid add pepper and salt. Mix with 
Fish Supreme and mix in half the 
sliced eggs and the chopped onion. 
Place in a-casserole and hake in a 
hot oven (400 F.) for 15 minutes. 
Remove from oven, decorate with 
mashed potato, remaining egg and 
tomato slices. Return to oven for 
5 minutes. Serves 4. 

FOND OF TASTY 
SNACKS? 

Try these for taste appeal at budget 
prices. Cook 1 tablespoon diced 
celery and 1 tablespoon diced onion 
slowly in 2 tablespoons butter or 
margarine. Add 3 tablespoons flour 
and mix well. Gradually add 2 
cups milk and stir constantly until 



Delicious Fish . . . straight 
from the deep, cold sea 

There s no end to the appetising 
dishes you can make with Kraft 
Fish Supreme it brings the 
delicate flavour of the choicest 
fish to your table at money- 
saving prices. Don t let the 
high cost of fresh fish keep fish 
off your menu. Get Kraft Fish 
Supreme in 8 oz. tins for only 
1/3. (Slightly dearer in country 
districts.) 




thickened. Cook about 2 minutes, 
then gently stir in 1 tin Fish 
Supreme. Season and serve piping 
hot on toast. 



KRAFT FISH SUPREME 

with OCEANS of flavour 

1/3 per 8 oz. tin (slightly dearer in country districts) 




Smart Beach Bag, 

Gay beach bags are exciting and very 
useful for the beach girl. So easy to make, 
even for the inost inexperienced needle 
woman. We suggest using deck chair can 
vas, which is cheap and almost waterproof. 
You will need a piece about a yard long, 
depending on the width. 




First cut out paper pattern, shown 
clearly in diagram C. Pencil iu the dotted 
lines, showing as bag is folded. Now fold 
the bag into shape along these lines and 
tack the two side insets into position. Bind 
all round edge with braid or bias binding. 

Stitch pocket firmly on outside or inside 
bag, as preferred. You will need two strips 
of braid or cord 19 inches long and stitch 
firmly into place, as clearly shown in 
sketches A and B, so that they hang well. 

You will be surprised to find how useful 
these bags are, and what a lot they hold. 



A Face Clean. 

This is a most important matter, and is 
not quite so easy as it sound.", foi; the skin 
of the face wants very careful handling. 

Never make the mistake of using ordin 
ary soap for your face. If you use soap 
at all, buy a thoroughly good "baby soap." 
Use this at night, and afterwards rub in 
some sort of skin food. 

At least once a week it is a very good 
plan to steam the face. This opens all the 
pores, after the manner of a Turkish bath. 

And, whatever you do, do make a habit 
of it. Don t remember it one week and 
forget it the next. That is no good at all. 

Experiment till you find a cream and a 
soap that suits your especial case, and 
stick to them. Because you must use some 
thing; mere water is not enough, any more 
than it would be for your hands. 



An inspector of schools, giving a school 
master a little advice, referred to the im 
portance of associating historical events 
with admonition. 

"For instance," said the inspector; "here 
is an apt example: Don t play with 
matches. Remember the fire of London ." 

The teacher appreciated the idea, and 
putting it into operation almost immedi 
ately. gave his class the key phrase, "Don t 
spit." 

The children gazed at each other in 
obvious perplexity. Suddenly a bright 
lad s hand shot up. 

"Well?" queried the teacher. 

"Don t spit. Remember the flood." 



Useful Key Case. 

These little key cases, made of gay 
scraps of coloured felt, make a delightful 
little personal gift. It has many advan 
tages, as you can usually see the bright 
felt in your handbag and you don t have 
to rummage through your bag. Another 
thing is that keys are apt to drag and 
spoil your hanky or powder-puff, etc., 
whereas the little felt case won t hurt any 
thing, however fragile. 

Sketch A shows case closed, and sketch 
B shows case opened. Look out your 
scraps of coloured felt, or buy a few pieces 
cheaply. 




Cut out as clearly shown in diagrams 
D and ~E, Add an initial or name on sketch 
D, as shown in sketch A, or trim with 
contrasting coloured circles of felt. Place 
the pair of shapes together, edge to edge, 
and neatly blanket stitch them together 
(blanket stitch shown in sketch F). 

Leave small part open at tdp for cord to 
run through. The key or bunch of keys 
are attached to a cord which passes 
through the end of case, and secured with 
ring covered with wool or cord, as sketch 
C. If you cannot buy cord, make a crochet 
chain. You can vary the size of case if a 
larger one is preferred. 



Home Hints. 

Water in which rice has been boiled is 
splendid for mixing cakes. 

Salt dissolved in ammonia will remove 
grease spots. 

Lenioii juice or cream of tartar added to 
pastry renders it much more digestible. 

Salt and water cleans dishes and crock 
ery much better than plain or soda water. 

A fresh buncji of stinging nettles hung 
up in the window of a room will prevent 
the entrance of flies. 

Vinegar will revive colours one table- 
spoonful of vinegar to a quart of rinsing 
water. Saturate the garment well, wring 
tightly, and dry quickly. 

If biscuits are limp and you want to 
make them crisp again, it is* best to put 
them into the oven, leaving the door 
open, until they begin to brown at the 
edges. 

If you long for a really flaky pastry, 
you should be sure to sift your flour care 
fully; and before you can do so, add to 
every cupful one flat teaspoonful of corn 
flour. 

If a bit of white bread on a fork dipped 
into a pan of hot fat turns brown in GO 
seconds, then the fat is just right for fry 
ing. 



500 LIFELIKE 
DOLLS 

For Little Mothers! 

^HE loveliest gift you could give, looks the 
living image of a real baby girl. Geor- 
^eously dressed in a taffeta pastel silk frock 
trimmed with lace and bows with bonnet to 
match, wearing socks and leather shoes. A life 
like baby-size doll that says " Ma Ma," shuts 
her pretty eyes, has moveable arms and legs. 
The dearest, cuddliest doll that will delight every 
little mother lucky enough to own one. 

Limited Release 

but Hurry! 

CUE has lovely long curls, eyelashes and teeth, 
and stands 20in. high; is almost unbreak 
able. On Xmas morning your gift will excite 
her. such a richly dressed, handsome doll will 
give you pride in your judgment. Five pounds 
value for only 3 (post free), or 20/- lay-by. 

Satisfaction or 
MONEY BACK! 





J^ SOFT cuddlesome doll for 
bedspread or table, or a per 
fect dollie for a smaller girl, 20/- 
only (Interstate I/- extra.) 



World Wide Mail Order Pty. Ltd., DepU 16, 
24 Clarence St., Sydney. 

Enclosed is 3 (complete cost) or 20/- lay-by 
for one large Yvonne doll, or 20/- complete cost 
(Interstate I/- extra) for one small Jan doll. 

Name _. 

Address .... 



A.H.J. 11 49 



"/ Made it Myself!" 



Thrill to the exquisite Hand 

Work Ideas in 

"LORNA ROSE" 

Needle Craft Book No. 14 

at l/9d., post free. 

Eighteen pages packed FULL 
with charming patterns Hat, 
Bag and Gloves, (illustrated 
here), also directions for 
distinctive knitting, crocheting, 
embroidering, including jump 
ers, cardigans, pullovers, rug,, 
boqs, belts, tapestries, cur 
tains, collars, Daisy Wheel 
Fascinator, and a wealth of 
o.her novelties. 

Book and Cotton Yarns in Ecru 
or White for Illustrated Set. 
19/6 Post Free from Lorna Rosa 
Needle Craft, P.O. Box II, Dul- 
wich Hill. Sydney. 





LORNA ROSE NEEDLE CRAFT 

P.O. BOX 11, DULWICH HILL, 
SYDNEY 



42 











\ 

1 




% f V : --V i.\ 

Preparation for 

MOTHERHOOD jf ; J^ f e ,, 1! 

TLffOST important is the health of the M \. 
Expectant Mother. Her diet should be y? 1 -, 
well-balanced, providing adequate nourish- . ; . i4 / 
rnent and including essential Vitamins and .x : - ;-jf|SjS 
Mineral Cell Salts. |;V/ : ^j 
Bio-Chemic Treatment is daily proving of j ^ 
tremendous value to Mothers and Babies in f^K^imSK^iS^ . ,.,-J-s * 
all parts of Australia. The Twelve Bio- 
Chemic Nerve and Tissue Building Cell Salts provide those essential Vitamins and 
Mineral Cell Salts required in the building of the child s frame strong, healthy, 
vigorous while for the Expectant Mother, they tone up the blood and entire system, 
ensuring an abundant reserve of nerve force, a rich supply of natural milk, a more 
comfortable confinement, and speedy recovery. 
Consultation and advice free of charge or obligation; any distance. 
BOOKLET FREE. Write to Dept. AHJ. ||. 
Established 20 Years. 




BIO-CHEMIC INSTITUTE 






BOX 1249L, G.P.O., MELBOURNE. 
Office: 108 Queen Street, Melbourne, C.I. Phone: MU 1971. 











Flies: To rid room of flies, keep a piece 
of flannel saturated in turps in a screw top 
jar and when flies enter room remove and 
shake; it will be found to act like magic. 



Before putting silver away, rub with 
olive oil. 



Coconut Caramels: Mix 2 cupsful desic 
cated coconut, 2 tablespoonsful flour, whites 
of 3 eggs, and 1 cupful sugar. Bake in 
quick oven. 

For rusty steel, rub with onions and let 
stand awhile. 



EVERY WOMAN SHOULD 
READ THIS TABLE 



HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


5 


112 Ibs. 


5- p 


118 Ibs. 


5 2" 


120 Ibs. 


5 3" 


I24!bs._ 
125 Ibs. 


5 4" 


if T/iese ore AVERAGE 
weights for a healthy 
woman. 




I can quickly 
solve your weight 
problem . . . 

No matter what 
your age, whether 
you are over-weight or under 
weight, I can, and will, help 
you. First thing to do is fill 
in diagram below and I will 
send you my interesting pub 
lication on beauty, together 
with your personal measure 
ments. Enclose 4^d. for 
postage. 

FREE! Complete Chart 
showing your ideal 
measurements . . . 

Fill this in to-night. 



AGE 




HEIGHT 




WEIGHT 




OFFICE 
USE ONLY 


Dept. F 



T. A. LANGRIDGE 

278 GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 



2/462 




PRICE 2/- everywhere 



43 



Baby s Daisy Belle Frock 



Materials: 4 balls Lady Betty wool, pale 
blue, and small quantity of "pale pink; 7 
j^ards pale pink narrow lace; 3 small flat 
buttons; No. 2 steel hook; daisy wheel 
(procurable at most stores). 

Abbreviations: Ch., chain; l.t., long 
treble (made by putting wool over hook 
twice); d.c., double crochet. 
The Yoke. 

Make 103 ch. and work 1 l.t. into the 
4th ch., then 1 l.t. into next ch., * 2 l.t. 
into next ch., 1 l.t. into each of next 2 ch. 
Bepeat from * to end of row. Turn with 
1 eh. 

Row 2 and alternate rows 1 d.c. into 
each l.t. of previous row. Turn with 3 ch. 

Row 3 1 l.t. into 1st d.c. of previous 
row, * 2 l.t. into next d.c., 1 l.t. into next 
3 d.c. Eepeat from * to end of row. Turn 
with 1 ch. 

Continue increasing in this manner in 
each alternate row until there are 6 l.t. 
between each increase in the 9th row. 

Row 10 1 d.c. into each l.t. of previous 
row. Break off wool. Down right edge of 
back work three loops for the buttons by 
working 6 ch. at equal distance apart. 
To Make the Daisies. 

Place the wheel knob in hand and put 
the wool on the flat side of the wheel and 
iiold in position in the centre with the 



thumb of left hand, wind the wool over a 
point of the wheel and over the point 
exactly opposite. Repeat this once more, 
two loops on both points, taking care not 
to cross the wool in the centre. Pass now 




to the next point and its opposite, and 
repeat as given. Continue until all the 
points are covered and there are 12 petals. 
Cut off thread about seven inches from 
wheel, thread a darning needle and stitch 



over diagonally between each petal and 
finish by sewing through centre three times 
firmly and cut off thread. 

Eepeat until you have 220 daisies. 
How to Join Daisies. 

A picot is worked on every third daisy 
petal all through the work. The picots are 
indicated by A on the design above; these 
are made by (slip-stitch into petal 4 ch., 
slip-stitch back into first slip-stitch). Work 
by the chart, slip-stitch into No. 1 4 ch., 
slip-stitch into No. 2 petal 4 chain, Ilip- 
stitch into No. 3 petal, 4 ch., slip-stitch 
back into same petal (this forms first 
picot), 4 ch., slip-stitch into petal No. 4, 
4 ch., slip-stitch into, petal No. 5. Take 
another daisy and slip-stitch into petal, 
which will be * No. 6, 4 ch., slip-stitch into 
petal No. 7. Eemove hook from work and in 
sert into No. 4 petal by slip-stitch, 4 ch., 
slip-stitch through No. 8, 3 ch., slip-stitch 
into first picot of first daisy, which is No. 3 
petal, 4 ch., slip-stitch into No. 9, 4 ch., 
slip-stitch into No. 10, 4 ch., slip-stitch 
No. 11. Make picot at this corner, 4 ch., 
slip-stitch into No. 12, 4 ch., slip-stitch 
No. 13.* 

Take another daisy and repeat from * 
until you have the number required on the 
row. When this is completed work up the 
side of daisy, picot at the corner, 4 ch., slip- 
stitch into next petal, 4 ch., slip-stitch 
into next petal, 4 ch., slip-stitch and picot 
into next petal, 4 ch., slip-stitch into join 
ing between petals marked B on diagram. 
[Turn to page 45.] 




44 



Australian Home Journal, November 



HOLD 
YOUR 



Rupture 



SECURELY! 



Use a Roussel Appliance for 14 Days Free. It is Light, Hygienic, Safe and 
Comfortable. No hard Pads to gouge painfully into the flesh, no stiff 
punishing springs, no metal girdle to rust, no buckles to stick, no unhygienic 
Understraps, and is adjustable in a few seconds. Doctors everywhere re 
commend the Roussel. Thousands 
of users says it definitely holds 



. One leading Doctor says : 
. [ orc [ er y 0ur appliance* 
for my patients because I consider them pre 
ferable to any other type." 
Mr. W. A. Mascord, 26 Albemarle Avenue, 
Rose Bay, N.S.W., says : " The hernia I 
had for four years has entirely disappeared, 
and I fully believe the credit is due to your 
appliance." 




the Rupture at work and sport, and many even 
state it has done away entirely with the Rupture. 
Call or send Stamp for details, Self-measurement 
Form, and 14 Days Trial Offer. There s no obliga 
tion. No matter where you live, we guarantee 
absolute satisfaction or refund your money. 
ADDRESS: THE ROUSSEL APPLIANCE CO., 
DEPT. 29, 9 MARTIN PLACE, SYDNEY. 




HURRAY! Its my old favourite! 



No wonder babies get excited 
when mother brings out gentle, 
soothing Johnson s Baby 
Powder! For this nursery 
favourite feels cool and soft 
as silk to baby s tender skin. 
Chases painful little chafes 
and prickles keeps him soft 
and smooth and sweet. Every 
baby knows Johnson s Baby 
Powder is first favourite for real 
comfort ! 

Best for BabyBest for you!" 




JOHNSONS 



PRODUCTS OF JOHNSON 



4BPS 



JOHNSON 



GENUINE FREE TRIAL 

and proof that you need not suffer 

Rheumatism 



An English Re 
search Chemist has 
discovered that Uric 
Acid has nothing 
to do with the pain, 
swelling, and stiff 
ness of Rheumat 
ism. 





Mr. Douglas Curzon s 
revolutionary discovery 
has opened the way to 
one of trie most remark 
able offers ever pub//c/y 
made to Rheumatic suf 
ferers. 



Kheumatic toxins are ttrst 
produced in the deep veins 
of the legs, and are then 
carried by the Mood to 
every part oi the body, re 
sulting in (1) sluggish cir 
culation ; (2 1 congestion ; 
and i.:! i pain and swelling. 

THE TRUE CAUSE OF RHEUMATISM 

is a toxic condition of the blood originat 
ing in the deep veins of the leg. These 
toxins cause the stiffening of the muscles 
and the hardening of the joints by be 
coming localised in certain parts of the 
body and there producing exactly the 
same sort of inflammatory thickening of 
the tissues as results from a boil. 

To remove the cause, whether Muscular Rheu 
matism, Neuritis, Sciatica, Arthritis, or Syno- 
vitis, it is necessary to (1) relieve the pain; 

(2) eliminate the poisons from .the blood; and 

(3) build up the Nervous System. Mr. Douglas 
Curzon s new development scientifically com 
bines and provides these essentials, and by its 
speedy, safe, and certain action not only defin 
itely assists in banishing the pain, swelling, and 
stiffness, but builds resistance against future 
attacks. 

FREE TREATMENT 

Send the form at the foot of this announcement 
and receive: 

(1) A supply of Analgesic Tablets to give in 
stant relief in every case of Muscular Nerve 
or Arthritic Rheumatism. These tablets 
are guaranteed to be absolutely harmless, 
relieving Rheumatic Pains wherever situ 
ated. 

(2) A supply of Rheumatoxin Ellminant. This 
scientific combination tones up the liver, 
stomach, and digestive organs. By its 
direct action on the blood it quickly and 
safely reduces swelling and stiffness. 



"Your treatment has done my husband a 
wonderful lot of good. He can walk five 
miles now; and, before taking your treat 
ment, he couldn t walk one mile; so I can 
highly recommend your treatment for 
Rheumatism." E.H.B.. Wilson, S.A. 

"I am very pleased to be able to say that I 
am free from pain after 12 months suffering 
with muscular Rheumatism in the neck." 
A.E.D., Orroroo, S.A. 



APPLICATION FORM 

The Controller, 

Anglo-Australian Laboratories, 
26 Hunter St. (Box 4242XX), Sydney. 

Please send me the supply of Analgesic 
Tablets and Rheumatoxin Eliminant 
promised free of charge and obligation. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

(Print in Block Letters and enclose 2Jd. 
stamp for return.) AHJ ,, /49 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



45 



HAND-SPUN FOR BABY 



The shawl is knitted in a four row lacy 

Materials: 8 ozs. 2-ply wool; 1 pair of 
No. 7 knitting needles. 

Size: 46 inches square. 

Tension: Approximately 6 sts. and 7 rows 
to 1 inch. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; st., 
stitch; sts., stitches; tog., together; rep., 
repeat; wl.fd., wool forward to make a st.; 
patt., pattern; beg., beginning; ins., 
inches. 

To Make. 

Cast on 274 sts. and work the border patt. 
thus: 

1st row: K. 2, * p. 2, k 
to end. 

Eep. this row until work 
measures 3 inches from 
beg., but in last row work 
thus: Patt. to last 23 sts., 
work twice in next st., 
patt. to end (275 sts.). 

Now continue in lacy 
patt. thus: 

1st row: Work 22 sts. 
as border patt., * k. 1, 
w.fd., k. 2 tog.; rep. from 
* to last 22 sts., then work 
these as border patt. 



rep. from 



stitch pattern with a plain border. 

2nd row: As 1st row. 

3rd row: Work 22 sts. as border patt., k 
to last 22 sts., work these as border patt. 

4th row: Work 22 sts. as border patt., p. 
to last 22 sts., work these as border patt. 

Rep. these 4 rows until work measures 
43 ins. from beg. 

Next row: Work 22 sts. as border patt., 
take 2 sts. tog., then continue as border 
patt. to end of row. (274 sts.). 

Work 3 ins. in border patt., then cast off. 

To complete the shawl, press it very 
lightly on the wrong side with a warm iron 
over a damp cloth. 




A country 
is not made 
great by the 
number of 
square mile 
it contains, 
but by the 
number of 
square people 
it contains. 




Baby s Datsv Belle Frock, way > workin g a11 alon g Joops and in 

rf .,->* between daisies, omitting picots as pre- 

L m page * viously when working dasies, thus form- 

l ch., slip-stitch into next daisy petal ing a scalloped sash around the bottom of 
corresponding with one just worked; into dress. 

this work 3 ch., pick up picot of other Around the sleeves work 1 ch. between 
daisy by slip-stitch, then 3 ch., 
slip-stitch back into the petal just 
worked. 

To start a new row pick up 
daisy and join where indicated 
by lined petals on second row, 
always picking up with a slip- 
stitch and working your chain in 
between each petal. 

When joining centre back fresh 
daisies leave the top two separate 
for opening below yoke; this will 
leave the bottom of dress with 
loose daisy loops along this. Work 
as follows: 

Join on the wool in between two 
daisies and work 4 ch., catch up 
loop of daisy. Continue in this 



each daisy loop and 1 between picots join 
ing dasies. 

2nd row 1 l.tr. on each ch. and d.e. of 
previous row. 

3rd row 1 d.c. in each l.tr. of previous 
row. 

Each dotted square indicates one daisy. 
The odd daisies at the top fit under each 
side of the yoke, stitching across each one; 
the daisies along the top of skirt between 
the two groups of odd daisies are gathered 
to fit into yoke, 10 to be gathered across 
the front four on each side of the back. 
Join the skirt A to B, except for the two 
top daisies on each side which leave open 
for small vent below yoke at the back; 
the small space between the two odd daisies 
forms with under-sleeve opening with a 
small portion of the yoke about 2 inches 
each side. The sleeves are indicated by C 
(two sets of 12 daisies). 

Press lightly with damp cloth. 

In the centre of each daisy work with 
pink wool a rosebud made by making three 
French knots with wool six times around 
needle. 

Cover the buttons by crocheting in blue 
wool a chain of nine. Join with slip-stitch; 
into this ring work 12 d.c., turn with 1 ch. 
and work 1 d.c. into each d.c. of previous 
row. Place button inside and draw up 
with running thread. 

To Make Up. 

Sew lace gathered around outer edge of 
yoke, neck, sleeves and bottom of skirt. 
Sew yoke with gathers into place, sewing 
across the centre of four odd daisies to fit 
on to yoke, then sew in sleeves. 



Sleep. 

Eight hours sleep a night is a golden 
rule. You need this much to restore your 
nerves and body, and if you cannot get it 
you should take a short time off during the 
day for pure relaxation. Complete relaxa 
tion is believed to-day to be as successful 
as sleep in keeping the balance of mind 
and body. Even if you have time, don t 
sleep much longer than eight hours. Too 
much sleep is as enervating as too little, 
for the mind and body, too long un 
employed, becomes "unemployable." 

If you find it hard to sleep, remember 
that the important thing is to reduce the 
tension of the mind. A walk last thing at 
night, a hot bath, a hot nerve-restoring 
drink, all have this effect. If you re dog- 
tired, don t try to sleep until you have 
refreshed yourself. Take a bath and lie 
on top of the bed with eyepads over your 
eyes; relax completely, and think about 
nothing at all (certainly don t count 
sheep). After a little, when you feel re 
freshed, get between the cool sheets and 
turn over on your side. You ll soon drift 
off into the sound sleep that will recreate 
your weary beauty. 



A prominent business man fell in love 
with an actress, and decided to marry her, 
but to be quite certain of everything he 
employed a private detective to report on 
her life. When he received the report, it 
read as follows: "The lady has an excellent 
reputation; her past is without blemish and 
she has a circle of pleasant friends. The 
only breath of scandal is that lately she 
has been seen a great deal in the company 
of a business man of doubtful reputation." 



Diagram showing how to arrange daisies. 



London doctor says Communism is due 
to bad teeth. We knew there was some 
thing loose in their heads. 



46 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 




FAMOUS FOR OVER 50 YEARS 

People all over the world continue to depend 
on Westclox Alarms to keep them on time. 
The new Westclox models are as modern as 
the moment. 

WESTCLOX 



made vn 

Distributed by BROWN & DUREAU LIMITED 

Melbourne. Sydney. Brisbane, Adelaide. Pertk 



irs SUCH A 

RELIEF TO HAVE 

NO TROUBLE 

WITH TEETHING . . " 

Try giving your baby 
Ashton 6 Parsons Infants 
Powders, which are wonder 
fully soothing at teething 
time. These Powders en 
sure regular, easy motions, 
promote restful sleep, and 
are absolutely SAFE! 

Box of 20 Powders, 1/6 




ASHTON & 
INFANTS 



When making steamed puddings with 
fruit in, use plain flour and carbonate of 
soda (i teaspoonful to a large cupful of 
flour). A nice steamed fruit pudding will 
jiot require eggs when made this way. 



Eggs are still expensive. To economise 
beat the white and yolk separately. One 
egg will act as two this way by adding 
one tablespoonful of cold water to the 
yolk and a pinch of salt to the white. 



ARE YOU SLOWLY 
POISONING YOURSELF? 

Remove the Cause 

WHEN waste matter Is allowed 
to accumulate In the colon it has 
three effects. It weakens the 
muscular power of the body to 
remove it. It creates poisonous 
products which through the cir 
culation reach every cell in the 
body. It forms a breeding- 
ground for germs by the mil 
lions. That is the reason high 
authority to-day regards consti 
pation as primarily responsible 
for eighty-five cases in every 
hundred of serious illness. Why 
specialists all over the world 
have made Internal cleanness 
their slogan. 

Coloseptic overcomes the pos 
sibility of Autoxima from the 
words auto (self), toxin (poison) 
by inducing better Internal 
Cleanness. 

Coloseptic is the product of in 
tensive research to find a remedy 
which would combat constipa 
tion at its source, the colon. 

A level teaspoonfv2 in a glau 
of water morning or night, one* 
or twice a week., is sufficient after 
perfect relief is obtained. 

COLOSEPTIC 

FOR BETTER 
INTERNAL CLEANNESS 

At all chemists and stores. 

4231 




The "Beds" use Karl Marx for theory, 
German marks for practice, and easy marks 
for victims. 



Money used to talk, now it whispers. 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



47 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[TURNINGS MUST BE ALLOWED FOR ON ALL PATTERNS] 



FROCK, 7451. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Skirt. For skirt panels of this frock use 
pattern provided for Frock No. 7452 and 
pin to paper. Mark along the side seam, 
across waistline to notch, down to notch at 
hem and across hem line. Cut out on 
marked lines. 

Facing. Cut a pattern for the facing 
from bodice front, following the broken 
line indicated on cutting guide. For back 
neck line cut a facing same width, using 
bodice back as a guide. 

Step 2. Testing for Correct Size: As 
this pattern has been cut for the aver 
age 36-inch figure it will be necessary 
to see whether individual alterations 
are needed. Pin pieces together, re 
membering that seam and hem allow 
ances are not in 
cluded. Place pattern 
over figure and ob 
serve fitting. 

If bodice front and 
back are too long, 
shorten by folding 
between armhole and 
waistline, and if too 





FOLD OF MATERIAL 

short, cut in same place and insert suffi 
cient paper to provide additional length 
required. 

To increase pattern, pin additional strips 
of paper along seam edges where extra 
width is required, and, to decrease pattern, 
trim away pattern edges where additional 
width is not needed. Eemove pattern from 
figure, take apart, press flat, even up all 
seam edges. 

Step 3. Cutting Material: Pin pattern to 
material as shown in cutting guide and be 
sure to place punchholes on skirt panel 
exactly on the straight grain. Take care 
to match all stripes accurately and cut 
eight panels from the one pattern. Mark 



off two strips for bias folds 2 inches wide 
and long enough to extend from notch at 
shoulder to centre front. Then a bias 
strip same width for bow, and another for 
belt. 

Cut out with allowance of 2 inches for 
skirt hem, 1 inch on underarm seams and 
i inch on all other 
edges. Before remov 
ing pattern from ma 
terial, mark clearly 
with tailor s chalk or 
tacking the exact 
seam lines, notches 
and punchholes. 

Step 4. Bias 
Folds: Fold 
bias strips in 
halves length 
wise with in- 
sides together 
and press. Pin 
to bodice front 
with folded 
edge extending 
upwards and 
raw edges together 
inch below a 
straight line down 
from the notch at 
shoulder to neck 
edge at centre 
front. Machine in 
place, press with 
folds extending 
downwards. Join 
shoulders in plain 
seams, press open 
and neaten. 

Step 5. Button 
holes: Mark posi 
tion and size of 
each buttonhole, 
which should be a 
trifle larger than 
width of buttons, 
on the right-hand 
side of bodice, and 
arrange for end of 
buttonhole to be J 
inch from edge. 
Cut binding strips 

inch wide and f inch longer than size 
of buttonhole. Fold strips in halves 
lengthwise, press, tack to garment with 
raw edges meeting exactly over mark 
and ends extending an even distance 
beyond mark. 

Machine along centre of each strip 
and do not take the stitching beyond 
marked line. Tie all ends securely on 
the inside. Cut along marked line to 
within i inch of each end and then 
diagonally to ends of stitching. Turn 
raw edges of binding strips to the inside 
and press with folded edges meeting 
exactly in centre. On the inside pin the 
triangular piece at each end to binding 
strips, fold garment back out of way and 
machine across each end through all thick 
nesses. Tie threads and press again. 

Step 6. Facings: Join front facings to 
back in plain seams, press open and pin to 
bodice with right sides together. Machine 
up front, around back and down on other 
side. Cut away excess seam allowance to 
within inch of stitching. Turn facings 
to inside, press, turn under raw edge, 
machine through fold only and tie-stitch 
to seam allowance at shoulders. Tack in 




place down fronts, cut openings in facing 
exactly under each buttonhole, turn under 
raw edge, hem to binding and press again. 
Sew buttons on left sije to correspond 
with buttonholes, lap right-hand side over 
left and tack together at waistline. 

Step 7. Side Seams and Sleeve Edges: 
Pin fronts to back in plain seams and 
machine from notch down to waistline, but 
leave an opening 3 inches above waistline 
on left side. Press open and neaten. 
Cut a self -material fitted facing 1 inches 
wide for sleeve edges. Join at underarms, 
press open and pin to sleeve edges with 
right sides together, machine in place, cut 
away excess seam allowance, turn to inside, 
press, turn under raw edge, machine 
through fold, then slip-stitch in place. 

Step 8. Skirt: Join fronts together at 
centre front and then join to side fronts, 
and take care to match all stripes. Join 
backs at centre back, then join to side 
backs, press all seams open and neaten 
edges. Join front to back at sides and 
leave an opening of 4 inches below waist 
line on left side. Turn under allowance 
on skirt top and pin to bodice waistline, 
easing fulness in bodice to fit skirt. Tack 
narrow tape to waistline on the inside to 
prevent this stretching; machine through 
all thicknesses as close as possible to seam 
edge. Press and neaten. 

Step 9. Side Opening: Attach a zipper to 
side opening or cut two facing strips of 
self -material If inches wide and 1 inch 
longer than opening, with one edge along 
selvedge. Pin strips to front and back 
edges of opening with raw edges together 
and right sides of material facing. 

Machine i inch from edges, press seams 
open and fold strips under so that selv 
edges are exactly under seam lines. Tack 
in place, machine i inch from edge, press 
front or upper-side under on seam line, but 
allow back to extend under front. Tie- 
stitch strips together at top and bottom. 
Sew hooks and bars to side opening if 
zipper is not used. 

Step 10. Belt and Bow: Fold strips in 
halves lengthwise, right sides facing, 
machine across ends and along edge of 
bow, leaving a space of 1^ inches at centre. 
Cut an interlining of buckram for belt to 
keep belt from stretching. Machine belt 
and buckram together along edge and 
across one end. Turn right side out, close 
open end by slip-stitching. Turn bow 
right side out, close opening by slip- 
stitching, press, tie in an attractive bow 
and attach to front as shown. Finish belt 
with a buckle and apply loops at sides to 
hold it in place. 

Step 11. Finishing: Allow frock to hang 
overnight. Try on and mark a becoming 
length with chalk or pins, measuring up an 
even distance from floor. Turn the hem, 
secure by hand and complete with final 
pressing. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
4^ yards 36 inches wide. 

[For 34-inch bust, take | inch off side 
seams of front and back. For 38-inch bust, 
allow ^ inch on side seams of front and 
back.] 

4~*~*- 

FROCK, 7452. 
Step 1. Completing Pattern: 

Bodice Back. Pin bodice back of Pattern 
7451 to paper and mark from shoulder 
seam through punchholes to the notch at 
the side seam for armhole curve; cut along 
this line and around the outer edge of 
pattern. 

Sleeve. Pin half -sleeve to a large sheet 
[Turn to page 49,] 



48 



Australian Home Journal, November 1 , 1 949 




A happy family life depends not on how much is 
in the pay envelope, but on how wisely the money 
is spent. The Commonwealth Savings Bank offers 
you an easy means of saving any surplus you 
may have after paying for every day expenses. 
Open accounts for yourself and all the family. 
Show your children the value of money by teaching 
them to save. Store up comfort and security. 



Play Safe - 



BA1VK 



C.S.B. 30-62. 




Zealand 




From the crystal-clear streams of New Zealand come WHITEBAIT tiny 
inch-long fish, the most delicately flavoured in the world. ST. GEORGE 
retains the full freshness and unique flavour of Whitebait by quick 
canning and provides you with a special treat for every occasion. Serve 
St. George Whitebait to your guests and your family it s delightful. 

At all leading 
Australian Stores 




ST. GEORGE 

WHITEBAIT 



Dunedin 



IRVINE STEVENSON S ST. GEORGE CO. LTD. New Zea | and 



Plunge beetroot into cold water as soon 
as it is cooked and the peeling is avoided. 
Just rub off the skin. 



"The earth is the Lord s, and the fulness 
thereof: the world, and they that dwell 
therein." Psalms 24, 1. 



Thus a British correspondent: "The film 
industry made a statement that stars 
salaries should be cut in view of Govern 
ment policy. Recently we saw splashed 
before us a 100,000 contract for one 18- 
year-old actress. Higher wages mean higher 
prices for seats." 




Just take 
a i-tea- 
spoo nful 
two or 
t h r 
times a 
day, for 
health. 



No brewing, 

no fuss, no preparation 

of any kind required. 



NATURE S WAY 
TO HEALTH . 



Monastery Herbs are Nature s own 
remedy a mixture of herbs, seeds, 
barks and flowers, finely ground and 
blended in the true tradition of the 
monks of old. A quarter of a tea- 
spoonful taken regularly with meals 
will make you gloriously well. Take 

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monastery Herbs 

Nature s own treatment for CONSTI 
PATION, INDIGESTION, ACIDITY, 
RHEUMATISM, BAD BLOOD, GOUT, 
LIVER and KIDNEY COMPLAINTS. 
SKIN DISEASES. 

Taken regularly, Monastery Herbs will 
quickly cleanse your system of the 
poisons that cause painful symptoms. 
Joint and muscle pains vanish, stomach 
and intestines are cleansed, the blood 
purified. Boils and blemishes dis 
appear in no time. Send for your sup 
ply of Nature s own remedy, NOW! 

Sole Proprietors: MONKSEATON HERBAL 
ISTS LTD., 52 Peru St., Salford. 3 Lanes.. 
England. 

- SEND THIS COUPON NOW. 

Send 1/6 Postal Note for I oz. package 
of Monastery Herbs. Post free. This will 
bring you by post an ample supply for a 
thorough-going test of the virtues of this 
natural aid to good health. Send to-day. 

8 oz. size also available at IO/-, post free. 

COMMONWEALTH & DOMINION AGENCIES 
PTY. LTD.. Box 2949, G.P.O.. Sydney. N.S.W. 



NAME- 



ADDRESS- 



Make 

baby s 

hair 

grow 

curly 




If far from town send postal note or 
stamps to Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney. 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



49 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 47, ] 

of paper, mark along punchholes indicat 
ing underarm curve. Fold paper along 
straight edge and cut around armhole, 
underarm and lower edge through both 
thicknesses. Notch armhole, open out new 
pattern and cut along the previously 
marked underarm curve. 
Cut sleeve bands about 
2 inches wide to fit lower 
edge of sleeve from con 
trast material. 

Step 2. Testing for 
Correct ize: See Step 2, 
Pattern 7451. 

Step 3. Cutting 
Material: Pin pat- ^ 
tern to material as 
shown in cutting jjjmlj, 
guide. Cut out 4 
with allowance J-|ii||iH| 
of 2 ins. for f^jjgM 
skirt hem, 1 / / I 
in. on underarm . 
seams and \ 
inch on all 
other edges. 
Before remov- 





FOUD OF MATERIAL 

ing pattern from material, mark 
clearly with tailor s chalk or tacking 
exact seam lines, notches and punch 
holes. 

Step 4. Bodice: Fold inverted tueks 
in front on lines indicated by punch 



holes and machine on the inside. Press 
with folds extending towards neck edge. 
Join front to back at shoulders in plain 
seams. Press open and neaten. Join collar 
at centre back, then join collar facing at 
centre back and press both seams open. Pin 
facing to collar right sides together and 
machine around the entire outer edge. Cut 
away excess seam allowance to a \ inch of 
stitching, turn right side out, press and pin 
edge to neck edge of bodice. 

Tack a self -material bias strip \ inch 
wide on top, machine exactly on marked 
seam line, cut away excess seam allowance, 
turn bias strip to inside, press, t, .rn under 
raw edge and slip-stitch in place. Turn 
under seam allowance along centre front 
edges, pin with edges as close as possible 
to the metal portion of the closed zip 
fastener. Machine in place. 
--a Step 5. Skirt: Fold inverted pleats 
J ii y|P at front and back on lines indicated 
by punchholes and pin with edges 
exactly over centre front and centre 
back lines, tack in place, but do not 
press. Turn under allowance on skirt 
waistline and pin to bodice waistline, easing 
fulness in bodice to fit skirt. Tack, machine, 
press and neaten. Pin front and back to 
gether at sides and leave an opening 3 ins. 
above and 4 ins. below waistline on left 
side. Try on to observe fitting. Let out 
or take in allowance if necessary. Machine 
seams, press open and neaten. 

Step 6. Side Opening: See Step 9. Pat 
tern 7451. 

Step 7. Sleeves: Join at underarms in 
plain seams, press open and neaten. Join 
sleeve bands, press open and pin with right 
side of band to inside of .sleeve. Machine, 
turn bands to outside, press, turn under 
raw edges and machine to sleeves. Pin 
sleeves to armholes with seam of sleeve 
meeting seam of bodice and ease evenly 
across tops. Try on again and note whether 
shoulder width is becoming and sleeve 
correctly set in. Alter if necessary, machine 
in place and neaten raw edges by over 
casting. 

Step 8. Belt: Make belt long enough to 
tie in a bow, or finish with a buckle. Apply 
loops at sides to hold it in place. 

Step 9. Finishing: Eemove tackings in 
pleats, then see Step 11, Pattern 7451. 

Pattern is for 36-inch bust. Material: 
4 yards 36 inches wide. Contrast: J yard 
36 inches wide. 

[For alteration of size, see description 
No. 7451.] ___^^____ 

SUN FROCK, 9114. 

Step 1. Cutting Material: Pin pattern for 
bodice front and back to material as shown 
in cutting guide and mark off two widths 
of material 36 inches wide and 14^ inches 
long for skirt. Cut out, providing a hem 
allowance of 4 inches and \ inch seam 
allowance on all other edges. 
Step 2. Bodice: Join shoulders together in plain 
seams, press open and neaten. Provide white 
eyelet embroidery edging and cut each piece 
twice the length of the space to which it is to be 
attached. Neaten both ends of each piece for 
trimming the bodice front by turning under raw 
edges and finishing with a narrow hem secured 
by hand or machine. Join armhole pieces at 
underarms in plain seams and press open. 

Step 3. Applying the Trimming: Lengthen 
machine stitch a trifle and machine inch from 
edge and again \ inch from the first stitching on 
the armhole and upper bodice trimming. Draw 
up both threads to fit armhole edges and front 
neck edge of bodice. Tie threads and arrange 
fulness evenly. On the two lower fron-t trim 
mings turn under the raw edge J inch, then 
machine through the fold. Draw up gathering 



threads on the inside only to fit space in 
dicated on pattern. Pin these two pieces 
to the front on these lines and machine 
over the previous row of stitching. Pin 
trimming to neck edge with the second 
row of stitching exactly over the marked 
neck line. Join bodice at underarms, press 
seams open and neaten. Pin trimming to 
armhole edges in exactly same way as it 
was pinned to neck edge. 






<P. 

m 



GATHER 

HALF 
FRONT 
SKIRT 



Si 5 

ni[_* 



Step 4. Fac 
ings: Cut self- 
rnaterial fitted 
facings 1 inch 
wide for neck 
and armhole 
edges. Join all 
pieces together 
in plain seams, 
press open and 
pin to neck and 
armholes with 
right sides fac 
ing. Machine 
on marked 
seam line, cut 
away excess 
seam allow 
ance to within 
a bare \ inch ~. 
of stitching, G* 
clip diagonally 
to neck corners, 
turn facings to | 
inside, press, i 
turn under raw 
edges, slip- 
stitch in place " 2 

and press j 

again. ~ 

Step 5. Skirt: Join at sides in plain seams 
and press open. Gather upper edge of 
skirt with two rows of gathering, as 
described in Step 3, and draw up both 
threads to fit bodice waistline. Turn under 
allowance on bodice, pin over gathered 
edge of skirt, tack, machine as close as 
possible to seam edge, press and neaten. 

[Turn to page 50.] 



GATHER 

HALF 

BACK 

SKIRT 



50 



Australian Home Journal, November 1 , 1 949 



YOUR SMARTEST JUMPER 



It s a simple stocking-stitch jumper, but 
wards, convert it into 

Materials: 7 o/s. 3-ply wool in yellow; 
a ball each of green and brown 4-ply wool 
for the cross-stitch; a pair each of Nos. 10 
and 12 knitting needles. 

Tension: 7 sts. and 9 rows to 1 inch. 

Measurements: Length, 19 inches; chest, 
34 inches; sleeve seam, 6 inches. 

Abbreviations: St., stitch; k., knit; p., 
purl; st.-st., stocking-stitch is k. 1 row, 
p. 1 row alternately; dee., decrease by 
working 2 sts. together; inc., increase by 
working twice into the same st. 
The Back. 

Using No. 12 needles and yellow wool, 
cast on 100 sts. and work in k. 2, p. 2 rib 
for 4 inches, working into the backs of 
the sts. on the first row. 





Change to No. 10 needles and st.-st. and 
work 4 rows straight. Inc. at both ends 
of the next and every following 6th row 
until there are 120 sts. on the needle. Con 
tinue straight until work measures 12 
inches from the beginning, then shape the 
armholes by casting off 3 sts. at the begin 
ning of the next 6 rows and dec. at both 
ends of the following 5 rows. (92 sts.). 

Work straight for 5^ inches, then shape 
the neck and shoulders. Work to within 
7 sts. of the end, turn, and work to within 
7 sts. of the opposite end, turn. Work to 
within 14 sts. of the end, turn, and work 
to within 14 sts. of the opposite end, turn. 
Work over 25 sts., cast off 14 sts., then 
work to within 21 sts. of the end, turn, and 
work to neck. Cast off 10 sts. and work 
across the remainder. Cast off. Join the 
wool to the neck edge of the opposite side 
and complete to match. 

The Front. 

Proceed as for the back until work 
measures 4 inches above the armhole shap- 



the rows of cross-stitch, worked on after- 
something really special. 

ing. On the next k. row k. 41, cast off 10, 
k. to end. Continue on the last set of sts., 
leaving the others on a holder. P. to neck. 
Cast off 3 sts. at the beginning of the next 
3 rows, which start at the neck edge, then 
dec. at the same edge of the following 3 
rows. 

Continue straight on the remaining 29 
sts. until the armhole edge is 6 rows longer 
than that of the back. Now shape the 
shoulder by working from the neck edge 
to within 7 sts. of the armhole edge, then 
14 sts., then 21 sts. of the same edge. On 
the next row work across all sts., then cast 
off. Join the wool to the front edge of the 
opposite side and complete this side to 
match the first. 

The Neck. 

Join one shoulder 
seam, then, using No. 
12 needles and holding 
the right side of the 
work towards you, pick 
up and k. through the 
sts. round the neck. 
(100 sts. on original.) 
Work 1J inches in k. 
2, p. 2 rib. Cast off 
loosely in rib. 

The Sleeves. 
Using No. 12 needles 
cast on 72 sts. and 
work 2 inches in k. 2, 
p. 2 rib, working into 
the backs of the sts. on 
the 1st row. Change to 
No. 10 needles and 
st.-st. and work 2 rows. 
Inc. at both ends of 
the next and every fol 
lowing alternate row 
until there are 104 sts. 
on the needle. Work 
1 row, then shape the 
top by dec. at the 
beginning of every 
row until 84 sts. re 
main, then dec. at 
both ends of every 
row until 36 sts. re 
main. Cast off. 

Make the second 
sleeve in the same 
way. 
To Make Up. 

Join the second shoulder seam, including 
the ribbing. Then with the 4-ply wool work 
bands of 6 rows of cross-st. across the 
jumper back and front or front only 
a cross on every alternate st., missing one 
row of the knitting between the rows. 
Work these bands in alternate colours, 
with 8 rows of the knitting free between 
the bands. Sew the tops of the sleeves 
into the armholes, easing the fulness at 
the top of the shoulder, then press on the 
wrong side with a hot iron over a damp 
cloth. Sew up the side and sleeve seams 
and press these. 




The ten commandments don t need to 
be rewritten half as much as they need 
to be reread. 



OUR FREE PATTERNS 

[From page 49.1 

Step 6. Finishing: Cut two straight 
lengths of self -material for the half belt 
and bow 4 inches wide and long enough 
to tie in an attractive bow at centre back. 
Finish all edges with narrow hems secured 
by machine. Attach one end of each piece 
to the underarm seam and tie. Complete 
by turning up the hem, securing by hand 1 
and giving the final pressing. 

Pattern is for girl 8 years. Material; 
If yards 36 inches wide. 



THE NEW CHIEF 

[From page 13.] 

while her head sang dizzily and even her 
tongue forgot it was sheer nonsense to- 
gay dreamily, "I didn t but we ll never 
convince each other, not if we talk about 
it all our lives." 

But mercifully there was only Ronnie 
to hear her, and he did not notice it wa 
nonsense. He just said foolishly: 

"As long as we re together to talk about 
something, nothing else matters." 



Drunken Motorists. 

Again and again newspapers and motor 
ists associations have drawn attention to 
lenient treatment meted out to motorists 
who have been drunk when in charge of 
their vehicles. Often an ad misericordium 
appeal is made to magistrates that if the 
motorist is convicted he will lose his 
licence, which will mean his loss of liveli 
hood. Far better for the motor-driver to 
lose his licence than for citizens to lose 
their lives. Besides, the loss of a licence 
does not necessarily mean the loss of 
employment. These drunken drivers can 
get work elsewhere where they will cease 
to be a menace on the roads. Often also 
when an appeal is made to a higher court 
the presiding judge takes a tolerant view 
of the offence and places the offender on 
a bond. An English judge has said: "A 
drunken motor-driver can be a potential 
killer. There is no place on the road 
for him." We agree. 

Convictions for drunken driving in 
N.S.W. in 1948 were 182 more than in 1947, 
but 50 fewer drunken drivers lost their 
licences. 

Figures were: Total offences proved, 1252 
in 1947, 1434 in 1948. Convicted with 
automatic disqualification, 996 and 946; 
discharged under Section 556A, 256 and 
488. 

In the appeal courts in 1947 there were 
33 appeals allowed unconditionally in 
traffic cases involving automatic disquali 
fication (most being drunken driving), 107 
discharged under Section 556A, and 134 
disallowed; 1948 figures were 29, 145 and 
125. 

Maximum penalty for drunken driving ia 
100 fine or 12 months gaol, or both. 



If the people were as religious as the 
statistics show them to be, this country 
would be doing quite well. 



Idlers along the boulevards are cynic 
ally smiling at the report of a reception 
in Switzerland for a group of high French 
functionaries. Among these, the story goes, 
was France s Minister of Finance, who was 
received with the utmost gravity by the 
Swiss hosts. But when, in turn, the Swiss 
introduced their Minister of the Navy, the 
French visitors could not forbear to burst 
into laughter. 

"But why do you laugh?" a Swiss digni 
tary demanded, with hauteur. "We didn t, 
when you presented your Minister of 
Finance." 



Australian Home Journal, November 1, 1949 



LOOK HOW 



a** 




Glad I found the cleanser 
that s FAST/ EASY/ SAFE/ 



Want proof that a grit-free cleanser does the 

best cleaning job? Just try Bon Ami today. 

See how easily it lifts grease and grime off sinks 
and baths. See how it polishes as if cleans. No 
dulling scratches to hold on to dirt and make 
you work harder. No extra rubbing to get a 

BON AMI 



bright sparkle! Fine, white Bon Ami is fast and 

safe for your best porcelain and enamel surfaces 

safe for your pretty hands, 

too. Try it just once either 

Bon Ami Powder or Bon Ami 

Cake and then compare 

the results you get! 



Jiasnf scratched yet"! 




POWDER 
and CAKE 



Printed by John Sands Pty. Ltd., Druitt St., Sydney, and Published by James Russell, for the Proprietors, at the Australian Horar 



CLrnotts 



f ffff f f** *fi*IP * 






^lafojU"..! 




FAMOUS 





The most pleasant break in every school day is playtime and the school lunch. There s 

a tasty snack then to be enjoyed, so make that snack Arnott s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits. 

In buying for your children, be sure you get Arnott s. 

There is no Substitute for Quality ! 



R 



[JOURNAL 



Registered at 
the G.P.O., 
Sydney, for 
transmission 
by post as a 
Newspaper. 



These 
Patterns 
Enclosed 



JANUARY 
2nd, 
1950 



9iI6\ 




Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 




v v 



Dental science has known tor j 
, many years that certain enzymes 

jg- in the mouth turn sugar into 

V acid. Dental science also 
# . knows that these enzymes 

H$ are created by an organism 
called "LACTOBACILIUS 

$. ACIDOPHIIUS" 
C Kolynos helps neutralise ^ 
J& these enzymes ; Those 
^f active antiseptic Kolynos 
^ bubbles .surge between 

r$ the crevices of your teeth 
9 % - leave them surgically 
a "" clean -and help prevent 
dental decay. 



JR*EX 

(U.S. A.) A 6-YEAR- 
OLD CAT JUMPS 
ONTO ITS OWNERS 
WA$H0A5fN EACH 

MORNING AND 
ITS 
.OWN TECTH/ , 

;-r^T 

<#rw 

~p . 5T- 

3C 






KOLYNOS 5AV6 YOU AVANEX BECAUSE IT5 CONCENTRATED. 
GOES TWICE AS FAR AS ORDINARY TOOTHPASTE. HALf 
AN INCH ON A PRY BRUSH 15 PtCNTV/ o 




DENTAL 
CREAM 



KQLVNQS CLEANS BETTER. TA5TE5 BETTER., LASTS LONGER/ 



fcn n T! 




Neuralgia? 

They work quickly and safely because, in them, pure 
Aspirin is balanced with Phenacetin, Caffeine and 
Quinine, the products known to fortify and sustain the 
effects of Aspirin whilst eliminating undesirable after 
effects. 



Take a couple of 



ANACIN 

Tablets instead 




For Safe, Quick relief. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 





Tucks, pleats, buttons and frills are all 
combined in this very charming mag 
nolia blouse worn by Viveca Lindfors, 
Warner Bros. High up to the neck; 
fastening down the back; long, wide, 
loose sleeves, wide cuffs trimmed with 
tucks and frills; and a much be-tucked 
and be-frilled front bodice. Miss 
Lindfors wears it with a dark skirt with 
a wide bandeau waist. 




Myriads of tiny seed beads of pearls 
are used to trim the round yoke of this 
nearly off-the-shoulder blouse worn by 
Dorothy Malone, Warner Bros. It is a 
loosely-fitting blouse with gathered 
raglan style sleeves and bodice. 



Lemon Syrup for Summer Drinks: Take 
4$ Ibs. white sugar, 4$ pints of water, add 
together and bring to the boil; then add 
2$ ozs. of tartarie acid and 2 ozs. of cream 
of tartar; boil again for 10 minutes, then 
remove from fire; when nearly cold stir 
in a dessertspoonful of good essence of 
lemon; lay aside to settle, and when settled 
strain through muslin, bottle and cork. 



Mate king 



on every card. 1 




Never Clashes 




OPAL-CLO BUTTON 




per card, in all 
popular colours 



Each colour beautifully iri 
descent . . . matching perfectly 
lighter or darker shades. 
Other Beutron Buttons in a 
range of 22 colours to match 
every shade of material. 



They boil. They dry clean. 
Hot irons can t hurt them. 
BEUTRON CARDIGAN 
BUTTONS. With special 
backing disc to hold button 
securely are obtainable 
everywhere. 



A Product of G. Herring (Aust.) Pty. LM., Sydney. 




/-VubLI dlldll 1 1UU1V 




The softer, surer protection of safe 

Modess is the happy personal secret 
of thousands of smart women who 

demand, this perfect sanitary napkin. 
Gentle Modess ensures complete 
comfort at all times. 

Ask for Modess at chemists 
and stores everywhere. 

A Product of 
JOHNSON & JOHNSON 

WORLD S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF SURGICAL DRESSINGS 




The handiest of all Cosmetic Aids 




JOHNSON S 

Cotton Balls 



ONLY 



1/6 



PER CARTON 

At all chemists 
and store* 



Heart to Heart 



The Speedster: 

"What would you do in my case? My 
boy friend, and I am very fond of him, is 
mad about motor cars. His father bought 
him one on his 21st birthday. He drives 
far too fast, and glories in it. When out 
with him I never feel comfortable, and I 
have implored him to keep down to just 
about 30 or 35. He merely laughs at me, 
and exultantly keeps the car going at any 
thing from 45 to 65. Can I do anything about 

it? S.F. Yes, let him have the car to 

himself. Speeding is just a form of mad 
ness, and any time he is liable to kill him 
self and those in the car with him. There 
is no reason why you should travel with 
him in the car and be ill at ease and 
apprehensive all the time. Break off with 
this maniac before it is too late. Almost 
daily you can read in the papers about 
cars getting out of control, hitting trees, 
or somersaulting so many times. These 
tragic accidents would not happen if the 
cars were driven at a moderate rate. All 
the time the police are after reckless 
drivers, but unfortunately they do not 
catch up with them all. 
Cancer: 

"I have a friend who wants to marry me. 
He is being treated for cancer, but does 
not think he is making much progress. 
Under the circumstances would it be safe 

to marry?" Green Eyes. Definitely, no. 

It is not necessary to enlarge on this. 
The Music Man: 

"For 10 years my husband and I were 
happily married. We run a small farm, 
the income of which he supplements by 
teaching music. He is 55 and has a female 
pupil 22 years his junior. Two evenings 
regularly each week are set aside for play 
ing duets and helping her generally with 
her music all given free. She has an 
hourly lesson on his teaching day. This she 
pays for. She is now in hospital 50 miles 
away. My husband went to see her and 
she asked him to take his car and bring 
her home. This he has gladly consented 
to do. I am very heart-broken and am in 
a very poor state of health. I have spoken 
to the woman and her husband. They 

both say it rests with us." Rosalie. 

The position appears difficult. Do not 
isolate yourself and develop a feeling of 
self-pity. Why not join in the duets and 
music, and show that your place in the 
home is social as well as domestic? If 
your presence at these little duets is re 
sented then you may have something to com 
plain about. In any case, give this idea a 
trial; the reaction may be a perfectly 
agreeable one, and harmony may reign 
once more in your home. 
Love or Money: 

"I am 18 years of age and very much 
in love with a young man of 22 who is 
also in love with me. We are eager to 
marry but there is an obstacle in our path. 
His father wishes him to marry a girl 
nearer his age who is a frequent visitor to 
their home; this girl is wealthy. My boy 
friend is very much against this marriage, 
as he does not love the girl, but as his 
father and her parents have arranged for 
the wedding we don t know what we can 
do. Can you help us? I have my parents 
consent to our marriage, which it does not 

seem will come off." Jacqueline. Yours 

is an age-old problem that has been dealt 
with in novels without number, with vary 
ing solutions. The correct thing for your 
Lochinvar is to marry the girl he loves and 
scorn the girl of his father s choice. That s 
the brave, new world idea, but in real life 
the wealthy girl is the stronger magnet, 



and the young man usually pursues the 
line of least resistance. If your boy friend 
has some spinal strength it may be 
different. 

The Dancing Master: 

"While on a coaching tour some months 
ago I met a very attractive man, a fellow- 
passenger. The tour lasted three weeks 
and before coming home he told me he 
loved me, and suggested, if I was agree 
able, we could be married in three or four 
months time. I really would not hesitate 
to accept him but for the fact he is a pro 
fessional dancer, training stage troupes, and 
also runs a school for modern dances. This 
will bring him into contact with too many 
women, and I am somewhat jealous by 
nature, so I don t think I could be happy." 

Beryl. 1 would not worry. A man 

whose business brings him into contact 
with beautiful women is much less likely 
to stray than one to whom feminine comeli 
ness is a rare treat. If you love him, take 
a chance. In every marriage there is always 
an element of risk; in fact, there is a risk 
in almost everything we do. If there was 
any sense in your argument, doctors, par 
sons, choir conductors, merchants, photo 
graphers, artists, and all kinds of occupa- 
tionists would be on the taboo list. Be 
your age. 

Marry for a Home? 

"Do you think the first reason a woman 

marries is for a home?" Agnes W. In 

one sense every right-minded woman mar 
ries for a home, since the home is the 
symbol of the new partnership, the sanc 
tuary of all high and holy hopes. It is as 
natural for the normal woman to long for 
a home as it is for her to desire the love of 
a good man, but the day has gone by when 
a girl need be forced to make a marriage 
of convenience. 

With the multiplication of industries and 
the ever-widening circle for women s work, 
the number of mercenary alliances in the 
middle-classes has been reduced to a mini 
mum. The educated girl who marries so 
that she may be supported is either hope 
lessly lazy or else the victim of an unwise 
training, which has failed to fit her for 
life. 

Time has proved, fortunately, that suc 
cess in business, distinction in the profes 
sions, and even fame in various artistic 
careers have not made women less sus 
ceptible to the influence of the most old- 
fashioned of cosmic forces romantic love, 
which continues to rule even in this pro 
gressive world. 

So long as love continues to exist in the 
world and that means until the human 
race is extinct it is safe to say that 
women will be reluctant to marry for a 
home, realising that more than four walls 
and a roof are necessary for their happi 
ness. 



If you want to be rich give! If you 
want to be poor grasp! If you want 
abundance scatter! If you want to be 
needy hoard! 



AUSTRALIAN HOME JOURNAL 
BABY BOOK No. 5. 

All that is latest and best In Knitting and 
Crochet for Baby, clearly illustrated with 
Instructions set out in the simplest way possible. 
It consists of: Pram Suit for the Baby Girl; 
Knitted Shell Sei; Pram Cover; Roseleaf Lay 
ette; Mauryeen Crochet Set; Coat and Bonnet, 
Bubble Stitch; The Berry and Leaf Set; Alice 
Baby Set: Pamela Outfit; The Graham Suit; 
Baby s Shawl; Jessica Coat and Bonnet; Billie- 
Boy Outdoor Suit. Price 1/3 (by Postal Note) 
to Australian Home Journal, 407-409 Kent 
Street, Sydney, N.S.W. 




WHEN BABY NEEDS A LAXATIVE 

choose 

LAXETTES 

they re particularly suitable for infants 
and nursing mothers. 




18 IN TINS 1/9 



The 

LAXATIVE 

KNOWN and TRUSTED 



GENTLE, EFFECTIVE, 
SAFE, RELIABLE 

LAXETIES contain phenolphfhalein. which is 
non- habit forming and is one of the safest 
and most reliable laxative substances known 
to medical science. This is incorporated in the 
finest block chocolate by an exclusive, 
scientific process, which ensures accurate 
dosage and strict conformity to British 



FOR 40 YEARS Pharmacopoeia standards. 



( BLOCK 

<, LETTERS 

I PLEASE 



SAMPLE 
COUPON 
SENDl^d 

stamp to covor AH J I5 

postage and .. . 

packing ... to Laxette Mfg. Co., 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne 





Colleen 
Dare. 




Clvtaq 9-lctares 



4 Birdwood Street, 

Lithgow, N.S.W. 
Dear Sirs, 

I am enclosing a photograph of my daughter, Colleen. 
At 18 months her weight was 28 Ibs. and ARNOTTS 
MILK ARROWROOT BISCUITS have been an important 
part of her diet since the early age of six months and they 
are still her favourite. 

(Signed) Mrs. L. Dare. 

There is no Substitute for Quality. 



.HUNDREDS of men, women and young people have 
written to me, worried and fearful about their eyes. 
After reading the amazing free book, " Better Natural 
Sight Without Wearing Glasses," they have found that 
there is a way to regain nermal vision without the need 
of glasses at all. 



My patients include men for the Navy and Air 
Force, and also men qualifying for all trades 
and professions : Civil Aviators, Civil Ser- 
vants, Clerks, Metorists, Engineers, Policemen, 
Railwaymen, Engine Drivers-people whose 
careers depend upon their eyes. 



SHORT F 

I A ILIN SIGHT 
TIRED FVF? 
TURMFn 




ASTIGMATISM 




Try this simple test 
for ASTIGMATISM. 
To the normal eye 
the width and depth 
of colour in the 
black bars of all 
four circles are uni 
form. When astig 
matism exists there 
is variation in the 
width and depth of 
bars. 



or any other eye weakness (except 
diseased eyes), Call or Write (en 
closing 2d. postage) for my 

FREE 32 PAGE BOOK 

"Better Natural Sight Without Wear 
ing Glasses" This includes testimonials 
from happy people who have discarded 
glasses. It will open up a new avenue 
of hope for you. 

EYESIGHT TRAINING 

(Ferguson System) 

Room 604H, Manchester Unity Bldg., 
185 Elizabeth St., Sydney. MA5455 

FREE CONSULTATION MA5455 



To Correspondents 

[The columns of this department for the answert to 
correspondents are designed to prone oj genuine help and 
benefit to readers who desire information concerning 
matters of dress, housekeeping, etiquette, the toilet, or 
hygiene. In addition to the proper signature (whieh will 
never be published under any circumstances) , corre 
spondents are requested to send a pen-name, to which 
the answer may be addressed.] 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 1 white of egg, 1 
oz. margarine, 1 oz. flour, 2 ozs. sugar, bar 
of chocolate. Beat white of egg and sugar 
with a fork till white. Melt margarine and 
add to egg and sugar alternatively with 
flour. Drop teaspoonsful of this mixture 
on to well-greased baking-sheet, leaving 
plenty of room for them to spread. Bake 
till golden in slow oven for about 30 min 
utes. Grease a rolling-pin, and the moment 
you take biscuit out of oven press it round 
rolling-pin. In two minutes they will have 
set. Chop chocolate finely and melt in a 
pudding basin set in a saucepan of boiling 
water. Mix it smooth with a palette knife. 
Spread this on biscuits and lay on tray to 
dry. K.L. 

MARRIED IN WHITE. "My fiance s father 
died quite suddenly last month. Will it be 
proper for me to be married in bridal white 
at my wedding in a few weeks time? It 
has been planned for some time, and my 
gown and veil are already bought." M.N. 

The occasions when a bride may not 

be married in white are few, and there is 
no reason in your case why you may not 
wear your bridal gown and veil. When 
there has been a recent death in the 
immediate family of either bride or groom, 
guests are confined to the family and to 
very close friends, and there should be no 
general reception following the wedding. 

MUTTON BROTH. For the invalid put a 
pound of mutton cut in pieces in a quart 
of .cold water; bring it slowly to a boil, and 
let simmer for two hours; when done, pour 
through a sieve, skim off the fat, and season 
with salt and a very little pepper. A little 
fresh well-boiled rice may be added. C.E. 

BUFFALO BILL. W. F. Cody was Buffalo 
Bill, an American cowboy and showman. 
He is said to have killed 5000 buffaloes in 
18 months to feed workmen during the 
construction of the Kansas Pacific railway. 
In later years he conducted the Wild West 
show. He died over 30 years ago. Inter 
ested. 

INK ON CARPET. As soon as the ink has 
been spilled take up as much as you 
can with a spoon, and then pour on cold 
water repeatedly, still taking up the liquid 
with the spoon. Next, rub the place with 
a little wet oxalic acid or salt of sorrel, 
and wash it off immediately with cold 
water. Then rub on some hartshorn. 
Mrs. McG. 

ELYSEE. The palace of Elysee was a 
residence in Paris built in 1718 for the 
Count of Evreux, and later purchased by 
Mme. de Pompadour; it was also occupied 
by Napoleon I and Napoleon III, and was 
later enlarged and altered before becoming 
the official residence of the presidents of 
France. Miss W. S. 

PINK ICING. Put the whites of two eggs 
into a bowl and break them lightly. Mix 
in gradually icing sugar to make a stiffish 
paste, and mix but do not work the icing. 
Add now and then three or four drops of 
lemon-juice and a drop of cochineal until 
the mixture looks thick, smooth, shiny and 
as deeply coloured as is desired. The icing 
should be spread fully a \ inch thick over 
the cake, or whatever it is used for, and 
should be placed in a good oven until dry. 
If the eggs are beaten to a firm froth the 
icing will not dry so easily. Time to mix 
the paste, till it is stiff.- L.M. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



WEDDING GIFT. In giving a wedding 
gift there is no necessity to be formal. If 
you and your husband are sending a gift, 
just put from "Fred and Nell." Your gift 
goes to the bride, so there is no need to 
quote the bride s name. Gifts are sent to 
the bride s home, and all the friends know 
they are gifts intended for the happy 
couple. <W.W. 

MILK BREAKFAST CAKES. A batter of 
flour, milk and yeast should be made over 
night for these cakes. Half a pint of 
yeast and a quart of milk made warm will 
moisten half a dozen pounds of flour. When 
risen next morning (the batter should be 
covered and set by the fireplace during the 
night), beat into it four or five ounces of 
butter melted, knead and make into small 
cakes, using aa much flour as will be neces 
sary to prevent the dough sticking to the 
fingers. Put the cakes as they are made 
on a baking-tin before the fire while the 
oven is getting the required heat, then 
bake; they will take about 20 minutes in 
a hot oven. Send them to table quickly, 
well-buttered and hot. Nita W. 

ONION GBUEL. Slice one onion, and boil 
it in the quantity of water required for the 
gruel till quite tender; then add oatmeal, 
mixed smooth in cold water, a little fresh 
butter, a peppercorn or two, etc.; let it 
boil a few minutes; then strain it. 
Nurse B. 

NOBMA SHEABEB was born in 1904. She 
has appeared in both silent and talking 
pictures. Since 1929, when the talkies 
were less than a year old, Norma has been 
featured in a large number of pictures, 
such as "The Last of Mrs. Cheyney," "The 
Trial of Mary Dugan," "Let Us Be Gay," 
"Private Lives," "Smilin Through," 
"Strange Interlude," "Borneo and Juliette." 
"Idiot s Delight," "Her Cardboard Lover." 
Fanny. 

MOLASSES TOFFEE. Take 2 cupsful of 
brown sugar, 1 cupful of molasses, $ a 
cupful of water, and tablespoonful of 
vinegar; boil together until nearly done, 
when add ^ a teaspoonful of soda that has 
been dissolved in a little hot water. Boil 
until the toffee becomes brittle when 
tested in cold water, and flavour just as 
you remove it from the fire. This toffee 
may be pulled until it glistens like gold. 
If you cannot get molasses, treacle will do, 
but for the best result use molasses. 
Linda R. 

BBUNHILDA. "I heard some people talk 
ing about Brunhilda the other day, and 
their talk was beyond me. Who was 

BrunhildaJ" Eva M. Brunhilda, in the 

Norse mythology, was a man-like queen in 
the "Nibelungen Lied" who offered to 
marry the man who could beat her in feats 
of strength, was deceived by Siegfried 
into marrying Gunther, and meditated the 
death of Siegfried, who married her rival, 
Kriemhilda; this she accomplished by the 
hand of Hagen. Also a queen of Aus- 
trasia who, about the 7th century, had a 
life-long quarrel with Fredegunde, the 
queen of Neustria, the other division of 
the Frankish world. Curious. 



KNITTED AND CROCHET TOYS. 
We have published a booklet which 
will be appreciated by those interested in 
knitted and crochet toys. Full instructions 
and illustrations are given for the follow 
ing: The Duck; A Cuddlesome Pup; Our 
Fluffy Lamb; Christmas Doll Set, compris 
ing Coat, Dress, Bootees, Bonnet, Singlet 
and Pilchers; Eddie, the Elephant; Knitted 
Lamb; Jumbo in Crochet; Poodle Purse; 
Humpty Dumpty; Mickey Mouse. The 
ideal instruction book for toy-makers and 
Red Cross workers. Send I/- postal note 
for a copy. 



RHEUMATISM GOES AS SHE LOSES UGLY FAT 

Great London Hospital endorses famous Youth-0-Fora 

Tor many years," says Mrs. Fitzpatrick, "I have been crippled with rheumatism, 
until some friends recommended me to take Youth-O-Form to reduce my weight. 
I DID SEDUCE and, more marvellous still, my rheumatism completely disappeared. 
That was four years ago. The London winter I find very severe, and this year I 
got rheumatism badly again, and all the prescriptions were useless. I told my doctor, 
who is leading physician at one of the big hospitals here, that Youth-O-Forin wa 
the only thing that ever did me any good, and he advised me to try it again and 
tLat the Youth-O-Form prescription was 



well known, 
and fit." 



Once again I am quite well 

If you are overweight and 
suffer from Rheumatism, 
Indigestion, Constipation, 
or constant headaches, 
Youth-O-Form will help 
you, too. 

Mrs. Darley, pictured below, is only 
one of countless Australian women 
who have reyained health and appear- 
^ ance through Youth-O-Form. 



WHAT YOU SHOULD WEIGH 


Height 


15-19 


20-21 


25-29 


30-34 


35-40 


ft. in. 


st. Ib. 


St. Ib. 


su Ib. 


st. Ib. 


St. IS 


4 11 


7 5 


7 8 


7 11 


8 


8 3 


5 6 


7 7 


7 10 


7 13 


8 2 


8 5 


5 1 


7 9 


7 12 


8 1 


8 4 


8 7 


5 2 


7 12 


8 1 


8 3 


8 6 


8 10 


5 3 


8 1 


8 4 


8 6 


8 9 


8 13 


5 4 


8 4 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


5 5 


8 7 


8 10 


8 13 


9 3 


9 7 


5 G 


8 11 


9 


9 3 


9 7 


9 11 


5 7 


9 1 


9 4 


9 7 


9 11 


10 1 


5 8 


9 5 


9 8 


9 11 


10 1 


10 5 


Add 3lb. for every five years cvtr 


forty. 




Youth-O-Form is pleasant, eflectiye, per 
""nent and easy to take. 

u can get the six weeks Youth-O-Forr 
"" Treatment for 20/- (or a 10-ca 
arton, 5/6) from your n*arx 
emist. 

If far from a Chemist, pu 
Postal Note to a piece o 
>aper with your name .i< 
ress; send it to Brit.sj 
"ledical Laboratn- .- 
iox 4155. O.P.O.. e d 
~>, and your Youth -O 
Form will rc.icl 
you by return rr st 
plainly wrap,-e 
and witto Til 
directions to 
use. 






ctor Answers 



Patient: "But why should I have Rheumatism, Doctor?" 

Doctor: "Well, Rheumatism can be caused by two things: 
an injury to a joint or muscle or by an accumulation 
of poisons in the blood stream which is a condition 
we call toxaemia. Thousands of people like yourself, 
in the last few years, have overworked and neg 
lected their health, letting poisons collect in the 
blood stream so that the ranks of sufferers from 
Rheumatism have increased enormously." 

Patient: "But, Doctor, how do these poisons accumulate?" 

Doctor: "Your blood is constantly flowing through your 
kidneys to be purified from uric acid and other 
poisons. If your kidneys fail to do this, these poisons circulate back through 
your body and collect in the muscles and joints, causing the aches and 
pains that most people call Rheumatism." 

Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids help drive out the crippling poisons from your blood 
stream that are the cause of Rheumatic aches and pains; your kidneys are cleansed 
and strengthened and you get a new feeling of good health and energy. 

If you suffer from Rheumatic pains, backache, sciatica, lumbago, kidney and bladder 
weaknesses, neuritis, gout, etc., start a course of Menthoids right away. 

Get a month s treatment flask of Dr. Mackenzie s Menthoids for 6/6 with Diet Chart, 
or a 12-day flask for 3/6, from your nearest chemist or store, or a postal note to 
British Medical Laboratories, Box 4155, G.P.O., Sydney, will bring you Menthoids 
by return mail. 

MM 

MENTHOIDS FOR RHEUMATISM 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 




and build 
yourself 

UP 
without 

medicines 





Kellogg s All-Bran is a natural 

LAXATIVE, HEALTH FOOD, BLOOD TONIC 



Your health depends on what you 
eat every day. To-days soft, 
mushy, over-cooked foods often 
lack the vital bulk your system 
needs for regular elimination. 
Kellogg s All-Bran supplies 
smooth-acting bulk which helps 
prepare internal wastes for easy, 
gentle and natural elimination . . . 
no medicines needed. 

Health Food 

Made from the vital outer layers 
of wheat, Kellogg s All - Bran 
brings you more protective food 
elements than whole wheat itself! 
Kellogg s All-Bran is actually 
richer in iron than spinach and 
it is a natural source of Vitamins 
B, for the nerves, B 2 for the eyes, 
Calcium for the teeth, Phosphorus 
for the bones and Niacin for the 
skin. It not only relieves consti 
pation but builds you up day by 
day at the same time. 

Delicious This Way 

Kellogg s All-Bran has a tasty, 
toasted, nutty flavour. You may 



forthe Bones 

the Teeth 

for the Skin 

r the Blood 



prefer to eat it sprinkled over 
your favourite breakfast cereal 
or straight out of the packet with 
sliced fruit, milk and sugar. Ask 
for Kellogg s All-Bran to-day. 
Sold at all grocers. 




"TIRED 
BLOOD" 

and 
Blemishes 



Kellogg- s All-Bran is a tonic 
for your blood rich in iron. 
Richer than spinach. It helps 
keep your blood at its proper 
iron level. Does away with 
"tired blood" . . . cleanses away 
blood impurities as it cleanses 
out internal impurities. The 
iron In Kellogrg- s All-Bran pro 
tects your skin from ugly 
pimples and blemishes. 





* Registered Trade Mark 



GENUINE FREE TRIAL 

and proof that you need not suffer 

Rheumatism 



An English Re 
search Chemist has 
discovered that Uric 
Acid has nothing 
to do with the pain, 
swelling, and stiff- 
Rheumat- 





Mr. Douglas Curzon s 
revolutionary discovery 
has opened the way to 
one of the most remark 
able offers ever publicly 
made to Rheumatic suf 
ferers. 



Rheumatic toxins are tirst 
produced in the deep veins 
of the legs, and are then 
carried by the hlood to 
every part of the body, re 
sulting in (1) sluggish cir 
culation ; (2) congestion ; 
and (3) pain and swelling. 

THE TRUE CAUSE OF RHEUMATISM 

Is a toxic condition of the blood originat 
ing in the deep veins of the leg. These 
toxins cause the stiffening of the muscles 
and the hardening of the joints by be 
coming localised In certain parts of the 
body and there producing exactly the 
same sort of Inflammatory thickening of 
the tissues as results from a boil. 

To remove the cause, whether Muscular Rheu 
matism, Neuritis, Sciatica, Arthritis, or Syr.o- 
vitis, it is necessary to (1) relieve the pain; 

(2) eliminate the poisons from the blood; and 

(3) build up the Nervous System. Mr. Douglae 
Curzon s new development scientifically com 
bines and provides these essentials, and by it* 
speedy, safe, and certain action not only defin 
itely assists in banishing the pain, swelling, and 
stiffness, but builds resistance against future 
attacks. 

FREE TREATMENT 

Send the form at the foot of this announcement 
and receive: 

(1) A supply of Analgesic Tablets to give In 
stant relief in every case of Muscular Nerve 
or Arthritic Rheumatism. These tablet* 
are guaranteed to be absolutely harmless, 
relieving Rheumatic Pains wherever situ 
ated. 

(2) A supply of Rheumatoxin Eliminant. Thi 
scientific combination tones up the liver, 
stomach, and digestive organs. By it 
direct action on the blood it quickly and* 
safely reduces swelling and stiffness. 



"Your treatment has done my husband a 
wonderful lot of good. He can walk five 
miles now; and, before taking your treat 
ment, he couldn t walk one mile; so I can 
highly recommend your treatment for 
Rheumatism." E.H.B.. Wilson, S.A. 
"I am very pleased to be able to say that I 
am free from pain after 12 months suffering 
with muscular Rheumatism in the neck." 
A.E.D., Orroroo, S.A. 



APPLICATION FORM 

The Controller, 

Anglo-Australian Laboratories 
26 Hunter St. (Box 4242XX), Sydney. 

Please send me the supply of Analgesic 
Tablets and Rheumatoxin Eliminant 
promised free of charge and obligation. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

(Print in Block Letters and enclose 2Jd. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



MELANIE BABY SET 



Materials required: 6 ozs. baby wool for 
the set or separately Dress, 3 ozs.; Mati 
nee, 2 ozs.; Bonnet, 1 oz.; Bootees, 1 oz. 
One pair knitting needles size 9 and one 
pair size 11. A fine crochet hook. Six 
small buttons. Four yards narrow ribbon 
(1 yard for sleeves, 1J yards for waist, 1 
yard for bootees, J yard for matinee). 
One yard ribbon for bonnet. 

Measurements Dress: Length, 14 ins.; 
breast, 18 ins.; sleeve seam, 2 ins. Mati 
nee: Length, 10 ins.; breast, 20 ins.; sleeve 
seam, 6$ ins. Bonnet: Around face, 12 
ins.; depth, 5J ins. Bootees: Length to 
ankle, 3 ins.; length foot seam, 3 ins. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; tog., 
together; wl. fwd., wool forward 
(lift p.), lift the bar from previous 
row before next st., place on left- 
hand needle and then purl it; B.C., 
ingle crochet; d.c., double crochet; 
eh., chain. 

Tension: 1 pat. nearly 1J ins. 
in width and 1$ ins. in length, using 
No. 9 needles (after pressing). 
The Dress (Front). 

Using No. 9 needles cast on 111 
sts. and k. 1 row. Work in pat. as 
follows: 

1st row (wrong side) K. 1, k. 2 
tog., k. 2, * (lift p.) p. 1, (lift p.), 
k. 3, k. 3 tog., k. 3. Eep. from * 
to last 6 sts., (lift p), p. 1, (lift 
p.), k. 2, k. 2 tog., k. 1. 

2nd and alternate rows K. to 
end. 

3rd row K. 1, k. 2 tog., k. 1, * 
p. 1, (lift p.), p. 1, (lift p.), p. 1, 
k. 2, k. 3 tog., k. 2. Rep. from * to 
last 7 sts., p. 1, (lift p.), p. 1, (lift 
p.), p. 1, k. 1, k. 2 tog., k. 1. 

6th row K. 1, k. 2 tog., * p. 2, 
(lift p.), p. 1, (lift p.), p. 2, k. 1, 
k. 3 tog., k. 1. Rep. from * to last 
8 sts., p. 2, (lift p.), p. 1, (lift p.), 
p. 2, k. 2 tog., k. 1. 

7th row K. 2 tog., * p. 3, (lift 
p.), p. 1, (lift p.), p. 3, k. 3 tog. 
Rep. from * to last 9 sts., p. 3, 
(lift p.), p. 1, (lift p.), p. 3, k. 2 
tog. 

9th row P. 1, (lift p.), * k. 3. 
k. 3 tog., k. 3, (lift p.), p. 1, (lift 
p.). Rep. from * to last 10 sts., 
k. 3, k. 3 tog., k. 3, (lift p.), p. 1. 

llth row P. 1, (lift p.), p. 1, * 
k. 2, k. 3 tog., k. 2, p. 1, (lift p.), 
p. 1, (lift p.), p. 1. Rep. from * 
to last 9 sts., k. 2, k. 3 tog., k. 2, 
p. 1, (lift p.), p. 1. 

13th row P. 1, (lift p.), p. 2, * k. 1, k. 3 
tog., k. 1, p. 2, (lift p.), p. 1, (lift p.), p. 2. 
Rep. from * to last 8 sts., k. 1, k. 3 tog., 
k. 1, p. 2, (lift p.), p. 1. 

15th row P. 1, (lift p.), p. 3, k. 3 tog., 
p. 3, (lift p.), p. 1, (lift p.), p. 3. Rep. 
from * to last 7 sts., k. 3 tog., p. 3, (lift 
p.), p. 1. 

16th row As 2nd. 

These 16 rows complete the pattern. 

Continue until 5 pats, completed (80 pat. 
rows), then rep. rows 1 to 15 (omitting 16th 
row). 

97th row Dec. for waist K. 2, * k. 3 
tog., k. 1, k. 3 tog., k. 3. Rep. from * to 
last 9 sts., k. 3 tog., k. 1, k. 3 tog., k. 2 
(67). 

Change to No. 11 needles and p. 2 rows, 
then k. 1 row. 



101st row (1st holes) K. 2, * wl. fwd., 
k. 2 tog. Rep. from * to last st., k. 4* 

102nd row K. 

103rd row (armhole shaping) Cast off 
4 sts., p. to last 4, cast off 4 sts. 

Join wool at armhole edge on wrong side 
and p. to end. 

K. 1 row, dec. 1 st. at beg. and end of 
row. 

P. 1 row. 

P. 1 row, dec. 1 st. at beg. and end of 
row (55). 

K. 1 row. 

109th row (2nd holes) As 101st. 

K. 1 row, p. 2 rows. 

K. 1 row, p. 2 rows. 



llth row (Buttonholes) K. 1, k. 2 tog., 
wl. fwd., k. 3, k. 2 tog., wl. fwd., k. 3, k. 2 
tog., wl. fwd., k. 2. 

P. 1 row. 

Cast off 15 sts. 

Join wool at neck edge on right side of 
work and complete right shoulder to 
match. 

1st row K. 1, si. 1, k. 1, p.s.s.o., k. to 
end. 

P. 1 row. 

3rd row P. 1, p. 2 tog., p. to end. 

K. 1 row. 

5th row (4th holes) K. 1, si. 1, k. 1, 
p.s.s.o., * wl. fwd., k. 2 tog. Rep. from * 
to last st., k. 1. 

K. 1 row. 

7th row P. 1, p. 2 tog., p. to end. 

P. 1 row. 

9th row K. 1, si. 1, p.s.s.o., k. to end. 
(15). 




K. 1 row. 

117th row (3rd holes) As 101st. 

K. 1 row, p. 1 row. 

120th row (neck shaping) (wrong side) 
P. 20, cast off 15 sts., p. 20. 

Complete left shoulder as follows: 

1st row K. to last 3 sts., k. 2 tog., k. 1. 

P. 1 row. 

3rd row P. to last 3 sts., p. 2 tog., p. 1. 

K. 1 row. 

5th row (4th holes) K. 2, * wl. fwd., 
k. 2 tog. Rep. from * to last 2 sts., k. 2 
tog. 

K. 1 row. 

7th row P. to last 3 sts., p. 2 tog., p. 1. 

P. 1 row. 

9th row K. to last 3 sts., k. 2 tog., k. 1. 
(15). 

P. 1 row. 



P. 1 row. 

llth row (Buttonholes) K. 2, wl. fwd., 
k. 2 tog., k. 3, wl. fwd., k. 2 tog., k. 3, wl. 
fwd., k. 2 tog., k. 1. 

P. 1 row. 

Cast off 15 sts. 

Back. 

Work exactly as for front to buttonhole 
row on left shoulder (3 rows from end). 
Omit buttonholes and k. this row. 

P. 1 row. 

Cast off 15 sts. 

Complete right back shoulder to match. 
Sleeves. 

Using No. 11 needles cast on 43 sts. and 
p. 1 row, then k. 1 row. 

3rd row (1st holes) K. 2, * wl. fwd., 
k. 2 tog. Rep. from * to last st., k. 1. 

[Turn to page 45.] 



10 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



THE LANGUAGE OF LOVE 



By ALMA KOBINS. 



Mary Smith, who didn t look a bit like a 
girl should with that name, slammed the 
cover over her typewriter and slid it to the 
back of her desk in one defiant push. Her 
grey eyes were smouldering with rage. Who 
did Anthony Koscoe think he was, anyway? 
He was far too big for his boots, tearing 
Hoout the office bouncing people and using 
that dreadful language like he did some 
times. And to think that for three years 
she had carried a torch in her heart for 
that moron! Why, she had been living on 
the memory of the few smiles and admir 
ing glances he had cast in her direction 
before he had sailed overseas. Which only 
went to show how soft a girl can be! 

She eyed her burning cheeks in the little 
mirror which 
hung crazily 
ske w-wiff on the 
wall behind the 



Knigftt. "It s only eleven o clock, and she 
certainly looked as though she was going 
places!" 

"One minute she is politely attending 
the switchboard so that Glen can wash her 
hands, and the next, hey, presto! she s 
packing up to go home that s if she has 
gone home!" Miss Knight sounded 
aggrieved. She stared around the office at 
the others and then added, sotto voce, as 
the door of Anthony Koscoe s private office 
opened: "Not that I d blame anybody for 
leaving this doggone madhouse in a hurry 
at any time!" 

Anthony Koscoe reached the switchboard 



A dull red crept up from Tony s neck 
and suffused his tanned face into a deep 
brick colour. He glared down at Glenice 
in baffled silence for a moment and then, 
obviously embarrassed, asked: "Well, 
where is she now, Miss Matthews!" 

"I m sure I don t know, sir," quavered 
Glenice doubtfully. She was just a little 
afraid of Mr. Anthony when he was on the 
rant. She had stood in awe of this self- 
possessed young man before he had gone 
overseas and now that he was back in a 
position of authority she was quite content 
to make herself a doormat for him. 

As Glenice spoke, Tony tried to calm his 
jangled nerves. Miss Smith always seemed 
to have that effect on him lately. She 
maddened him beyond control at times. 
Her calm, unruffled dignity and her deter 
mination not to hurry herself for him 
angered him to the point of ex 
plosion. At times he caught him 
self wondering why it was . . . 
after all, she was cool, efficient, 
quick at her work, and 
was, of course, damnably 
attractive. . . . Funny, 
too, how he cared about 
what she thought of him. 
He didn t give tup 
pence about the rest of 
them in the office. Not, 




outer office door 
and decided in 
an abstract 
manner that any 
artificial colour 
would only make 
her appear like a boiled 
lobster. 

The three typistes and 

the two male clerks in the outer office 
watched her in amazement as she crammed 
her felt tammy over rebellious brown curls. 
Without a glance in their direction she 
gathered up her bag and gloves and made 
for the double doors leading across to the 
lift. She lifted one shapely leg a few 
inches off the floor and, with a most un- 
Mary-like gesture, kicked the door open. 

"Phewl" said Peter Kemp, the junior 
clerk whose desk adjoined Mary s, and who 
had watched her exit in surprise, amuse 
ment, and not a little admiration. "Did 
you see that? What a paddy our Mary is 
in!" 

"I wonder what made her jump up from 
tke switch like that?" babbled Miss 



in three purposeful strides. "Where is that 
woman?" he yelled, his brown eyes glint 
ing with anger as they searched the room. 

"Do you mean me?" a timid voice asked 
at his elbow. Glenice Matthews had re 
turned from the washroom and was looking 
anxiously about. She had heard Mr. An 
thony s voice bellowing out loud enough to 
turn any Sar Major sour with envy and 
had scuttled back to the general office like 
a guilty rabbit. 

"No, not you, girl," roared Tony; "didn t 
I tell you to send Miss Smith in a minute 
ago?" 

"No, sir," said Glenice, blushing. "I ve 
been out for a few minutes and M-Mary, I 
mean Miss Smith, was attending the switch 
in my absence." 



She gathered her bag and 

gloves and made for the 

double door*. 

he amended his thoughts 
hastily, that he cared 
tuppence about her, 
either, if it came to that. 
It was just that he was always a little 
ashamed after an outburst of "nerves" if 
she was about she had that trick of seem 
ing to look right through him and beyond. 
Yes, she certainly maddened him at times. 
He found himself suppressing the desire 
to shout at Miss Matthews: "What do you 
mean, you don t KNOW where she is?" 

"Pardon me, Mr. Koscoe," a voice spoke 
from behind him. It was Peter Kemp, the 
junior clerk. "I think Miss Smith has left 
the office." 

"Left the office!" echoed Tony, the red 
colour creeping up again. "Left for where. 
What do you mean, left?" 

"Left for home, I presume," said Miss 
Knight in prim delight. 

Tony glared around the room for a brief 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



11 



second. Then he swung about and in 
three strides was back in his office. 

He knew what they would be thinking. 
War nerves, and his inability to control 
himself over the least little trifle. Well, 
they were right. He wasn t the same easy 
going youngster who had been working 
bis way up at Messrs. Radwin and Roscoe 
before the war. The years had left their 
mark, and his patience was at times almost 
threadbare. He d only been back three 
months and he felt it would take him years 
to settle down to an inside job after the 
freedom and outdoor activity of the Army. 
He d faced danger, yes, and with iron 
uerves, too, but for three years he d never 
once felt as confined as he did in this 
pokey office. Nor had he been continually 
subjected to the maddening poise of self- 
sufficient females like Miss Smith, for 
instance. 

He knew, too, why Miss Smith had gone 
home. Touchy little . . . There he went 
again! He d certainly have to do some 
thing about hia tendency to use profane 
language every time he felt his temper 
rise. He imagined it was an Army legacy 
quite a few might find embarrassing! 

His sense of humour adjusted itself as 
he remembered his conversation on the 
phone, as he had imagined to that little 
Miss Matthews who had been on the board 
for years and years and wasn t likely to 
protest or comment on his impatience. He d 
asked her to send in Miss Smith and a 
voice had politely informed him that Miss 
Smith would not be a moment. How could 
he gness it was Miss Smith herself! He 
hadn t been back loug enough to sort out 
all their phone voices. Females all sounded 
high-pitched and tinny on the phone, any 
way! Two minutes had passed without 
Miss Smith s appearance and he had felt 
his temper rising. He had picked up the 
phone and roared into it: "Dammit all, 
woman, tell that so and so fool girl to get 
a wriggle on." 

He smiled as he thought of her leaving 
iu high dudgeon over bis lapse. Appar 
ently Mary Smith was not all ice and cold 
ability after all! She had been with them 
only a few months before he left the firm 
to join His Majesty s Forces and often 
during the lonely nights in New Guinea 
when he was mentally going over his old 
happy-go-lucky work days he had thought 
of her. 

He hadn t thought it strange that she 
came into his mind so ofte n. He had al 
ready assured himself that he wasn t in 
terested in her personally. Nothing like 
that, of course. Why, she had been only 
eighteen, a mere child when he had left. 
Ft was merely the self-assurance and 
ability she had displayed when being in 
terviewed for the position they were offer 
ing that had intrigued him. He d been 
present in Mr. Radwin s office for that 
interview, as it was for his department 
that Miss Smith would be trained during 
his absence. 

Tf Mr. Anthony Roscoe had only been 
willing to face facts, he would have rea 
lized weeks ago that most of his recent 
temper in connection with Miss Smith was 
caused by his reluctance to admit that he 
was now fast falling in love with her, and 
his carefully preserved bachelorhood was 
being threatened. 

As he sat down at his polished mahogany 
desk, Tony glanced at the clock. Eleven 
.fifteen! Only four hours to catch the 
interstate mail, and that Government quo 
tation just simply had to go to-day. What 
on earth was ho going to dot He d in 



sulted their best stenographer and he knew 
Mr. Radwin s wrath would know no bounds 
if he learnt that Miss Smith had walked 
out on them, due to his uncouthness! Good 
stenographers don t grow on trees any 
longer and, to put things in a nutshell, 
there just wasn t anyone else in the office 
capable of handling the technical side of 
the quotation. He sighed and picked up 
the phone. Miss Matthews answered with 
alacrity: "Yes, sir!" 

"Do you know if Miss Smith has the 
phone on at her private address!" he 
asked quietly. 

"No, I m afraid she hasn t," Glenice re 
plied promptly. "She s had an application 
in for ages but hasn t had any luck yet." 

"Thanks," said Tony mournfully. He 
placed the receiver down gently and began 
some fast thinking. He d have to smooth 
things over as quickly as he could and get 
Miss Smith back on the job. He d have to 
apologise somehow. He glanced at the 
clock again, and then pushed his quotation 
papers aside and picked up his grey felt 
hat. He d have to go and chase her up 
He paused as he reached the door. Con 
found it all, he didn t know her address 
that s if she had gone home, anyway! He 
rang through again to Miss Matthews. No. 
she didn t know, but imagined Miss Knight 
would. He waited while Glenice did some 
investigating. 

A few seconds Inter he had Mary s 
address and was on his way. He pictured 
the curiosity and excitement that would 
pervade the general office concerning his 
request for Miss Smith s address. Well, 
they d soon forget it. Or so Mr. Roscoe, 
in his innocence, imagined. 

He reached Parklands Court block of 
flats at Maddenhurst after a few minutes 
drive from the city. He glanced curiously 
at the flats whilst he paused to light a 
cigarette, and was impressed with their air 
of quiet dignity and their well-kept little 
strips of garden. Flat 5 was at a side en 
trance, and after negotiating a flight of 
stone steps, he found himself tapping at 
Miss Smith s stained and polished "front" 
door. 

A young ouin in khaki army shorts 
answered his knock and looked at him 
with an enquiring expression. Tony glanced 
at the slip of paper on which he had hastily 
written Mary s address. Yes, it was num 
ber five, sure enough, but there shouldn t 
be a well-built young man with curly 
brown hair and a slick little moustache 
answering the door. Or should there? To 
his surprise he began to feel irritated, and 
in a hostile tone he never intended, he 
asked for Miss Smith. 

"Ah, Mary, you mean, of course. Mary 
is in the bath. Would you care to come in 
and wait! Or perhaps I could give her a 
message!" 

Tony glared at the young man sus 
piciously. Who was he. anyway, to be 
Answering Mary s door and offering to 
give her messages when she was in the 
bath! 

"I m sorry," he said coldly, "but a mes 
sage won t do in this case. I must see 
Mary, I mean Miss Smith, personally." 

"Come in, then. Come right in." said 
the tall man in shorts. Tony found him 
self ushered into a very tastefully fur 
nished living-room. "My name is Bill." 
offered the owner of the moustache geni 
ally. "Mary is a devil for baths," he 
added with easy familiarity. "Came home 
in a high old paddy, muttering curses 
about some infernal Mr. Roscoe, and made 
for the bathroom to cool off. She doesn t 



often erupt, bat, boy! when she does . . ." 

Tony seated himself gingerly on the 
edge of a deep, comfortable-looking chair 
and stared balefully across at Bill. So, 
he was the infernal Mr. Roscoe, he thought 
grimly, and she was on friendly enough 
terms with this fellow to be taking a bath, 
of all things at 11.30 a.m., whilst he was 
in the house. For the third time that 
morning he felt himself losing control and 
instinctively he began to bristle. 

"My name is Anthony Roscoe," he said 
abruptly to Bill, "and no doubt I am the 
infernal person Miss Smith referred to." 

Bill gave a long, low whistle, and then 
his face broke into a broad grin. "Oh, ho, 
now! I wouldn t miss this for quids. So 
you are the boss, huh! I ve heard a lot 
about you from Mary. Yes, sir, and judg 
ing from to-day s form I d say your num 
ber is just about up." He shrugged his 
shoulders slightly as he caught the expres 
sion on Tony s face. "Er, that is, I mean 
the firm s chances are pretty slim. Mary 
wasn t exactly wearing her Mona Lisa 
smile when she arrived home!" 

"I m afraid that what I have to say to 
Miss Smith must be said in private," said 
Tony stiffly. He was confounded if he 
was going to apologise in front of this 
. . . this young upstart. 

The grin faded from Bill s good-natured 
face as he rose from the twin chair to 
Tony s. "O.K., O.K., if that s the way 
you want it, Mr. Roscoe. I didn t want to 
intrude, of course. My apologies. I just 
couldn t resist the desire to see Mary s 
face when she pops out and sees you. Well, 
bye; I ll leave you to it." He glanced 
keenly at Tony for a few seconds and then 
vanished through one of the three doors 
leading from the living-room. From the 
clatter of military boots going over steps 
Tony gathered that he had gone out some 
back. entrance. Well, that at least left him 
to apologize to Mary in private, and to 
pave the way for a peaceful truce. He 
settled down in the chair comfortably and 
picked up a magazine. 

It was while he was idly turning over 
tie pages that he began to review his 
emotions over the last half-hour. To any 
one less astute than a sophisticated, self 
styled "confirmed" bachelor of twenty 
eight years, his reaction to Bill may have 
been put down to the general ill-temper of 
tlie morning. But Tony had been warily 
in and out of love too many times to be 
deceived. It was with an initial sense of 
reluctance which slowly mounted to some 
thing of excitement that he recognized the 
symptoms. 

A man doesn t bristle when he is talking 
to a male friend of a mutual lady acquaint 
ance unless he is jealous! Tony began to 
see clearly how his feelings had been drift 
ing this past few weeks. He was in love 
with Miss Smith! He might as well admit 
it. Yes, the more he turned it over in his 
mind, the more he liked the idea. He felt 
a quick sensation as though a great load 
had been lifted from his mind ... it left 
him lighthearted and boyishly excited. 
Why, of course! What a fool he had been! 
lie began to wonder what Mary really 
thought of him. Heavens, the woman 
must think him a boor! He d made no 
effort to be polite to her for weeks. He d 
been too busy thrusting his head deeper 
into the sand in order to avoid the clear 
sighted vision of Mary s brown eyes! 
Jealously he began to think of Bill again. 
Bill was no stranger. Bill seemed to fit 
into the apartment a shade too well. All 
at once Tony began to feel hopeless, dc- 



12 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



jected, and nervous. He d Lave to find 
out about this Bill fellow. 

He fell into a brown study wherein he 
lost himself in a delightful maze of Sir 
Galahad action and events, all leading to 
the one climax the elimination of the dis 
turbingly good-looking Bill. A fatuous 
grin of triumph spread around his lips as 
he removed his rival from the field and 
took up the ground floor position himself. 
He so thoroughly lost himself in the en 
suing plans for a bang-up wedding with 
all the trimmings that he completely ig 
nored the sound of a door opening behind 
him. He was just mounting the altar steps 
with Mary on his arm when he was 
brought back to reality by a voice 
coldly stating: "Well, Mr. Eoscoe, this 
is a surprise 1 Who let you in?" Mary 
sounded as though she was referring 
to some obscure pestilence. 

Tony rose from his chair and stared 
at Mary idiotically. 
"Er, hullo, Miss Smith. 
Who let me in! Oh, 
yes, a fellow named 
Bill let me in." He 
added inanely: 
"He s gone now." 

"Really? That 



"And what have you to say, Mr. Roscoe? 
Please get it over with as soon as you can. 
I wish to get out in plenty of time to see 
about another position." She let that sink 
in for a moment before going on. "I can t 
think of anything you are likely to say 
that will persuade me to return. I m just 
not interested." 

Tony closed his eyes to shut out the 
sight of Mary. "Miss Smith. I ve come to 
apologise for this morning. I just didn t 




must account for the rather 
desolate atmosphere there 
eems to be." Mary was 
standing at a door which 
obviously led to her bed 
room. Her hair was piled up on her crown, 
and pinned tightly. She was clutching the 
lapels of a soft blue woolly dressing-gown 
to her throat and, to Tony, she looked 
adorable. "You ll pardon me for a few 
minutes while I get some clothes onf Not 
that any business we have to discuss will 
take time. It s just that I don t like stand 
ing about in bare feet." 

Tony s eyes stared down at Mary s feet 
in fascination as she swept through into 
her bedroom and shut the door. He sat 
down again and picked up the magazine. 
Then he put it down and pulled out his 
cigarette case. He found his hands were 
slightly sweaty. Good Lord, what on earth 
waa the woman doing to biin? He felt like 
an ewkward schoolboy! He d have to for 
get the personal angle and concent rate on 
cajoling Mary back to work. That was it, 
forget the personal angle. 

Mary reappeared a few minutes later. 
She was dressed in a smart blue suit that 
enhanced her figure to perfection. Tony 
was aware that he d seen the suit many 
times at work, but it was the first lime 
he d ever been acutely aware of what the 
girl inside the suit meant to him. Mary 
sat down in the seat that Bill had vacated. 
She crossed her slim legs and settled down 
in a manner that suggested she was com- 
pletely mistress of the situation. 



uncertainly, opened her mouth to speak, 
and then found she had nothing to say. A 
surprising enough fact in itself. She had 
been rehearsing in her mind what she 
would gay to Mr. Anthony Eoscoe all the 
time she had been dressing. 

She had expected him to endeavour to 
deal with her in humorous condescension, 
subtly implying that she was being child 
ish and unreasonable to fiy out of the office 
like that because of a triflng lapse with 
his language. But here he was sitting one 
moment with his eyes shut in 
an attitude of despair and 
the next fixing her with a 
dazed, cod-like 
stare. Very 
strange, indeed! 
She was groping 
around in her 
; mind for some- 

: thing to say 

when a tap 
| sounded on the 

door leading 
through to the 
kitchen. Without 
taking her eyee 



"What is that . . . that 
bounder to you?" His voice 
was shaking with anger. 



know it was you on the phone. I know 
there is absolutely no excuse for me speak 
ing to you like that. It was just that, 
well, it was just that . . ." his voice trailed 
off uncomfortably. 

"Exactly," said Mary dryly. "Do 3*ou 
know what I think about you? You are 
an impatient, egotistical, bad-tempered, 
spoilt, bombastic young boor!" 

"Yes, Miss Smith," said Tony humbly. 

Mary s eyes popped at him in amaze 
ment. What on earth could be wrong with 
the aggravatingly self-possessed Mr. Ros- 
ooe? He was sitting there staring at her 
as if she was a striped fish. She swallowed 



i; from Tony s, Mary 
s?id vaguely: "Come 
in." 

Bill poked hit 
head around the 
door and addressed 
! liimself to Tony: 

"Sorry to intrude 
again. I haven t 
come back to see 
Mary s face, merely 
to collect my pipe. 

I left it about somewhere. Do you 
mind?" Without waiting for a reply he 
walked over to the low mantel and 
began poking about the collection of 
bric-a-brac and photographs. 

Mary turned to Bill crossly. "What 
on earth are you talking about, seeing 
my face and intruding? And since 
when have you taken to knocking on 
doors around here?" 

"Ah, here she is." Bill picked up his 
pipe and then spoke to Mary, his dark eye 
brows arching into mock derision. "Darl- 
in > y u wouldn t want me bursting in 
here and embarrassing Mr. Roscoe, would 
you? Mr. Roscoe doesn t like the look of 
me." He slid his eyes around to Tony and 
then back to Mary again. Bending down 
over Mary, lie kissed her lightly on the 
ear, whispering: "The beggar is jealous 
of me. You can work on from there, 
sweet!" 

As Bill backed across to the kitchen 
door Mary watched him open-mouthed. 
Everybody seemed to be acting slightly 
crazy to-day! What was Bill saying. Tony 
jealous of him! Why, that was impossible. 
Or was it? Suddenly Mary saw the light. 
Naturally, Tony never knew anything about 
her private life . . . he d never taken time 
off to ask her about her family, if she had 
any parents ... or anything else about 
her life, either, for that matter. Her lips 
twitched into a smile as Bill crinkled the 
corners of his eyes at her adoringly. He 
blew her a kiss and then retired .around 
-the door. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



13 



Mary looked back across the room at 
Tony. He d been silent the whole time 
Bill had been in the room. His face was 
pale and he had half risen from his chair. 
His eyes were glued in a murderous glare 
on the closed kitchen door. She began to 
laugh to herself softly. Picture of a melo 
dramatic lover about to do the villain in, 
scene 3, last act of a 1900 drama. So! 
Mr. Eoscoe was feeling the pangs of love! 
She felt a delicious whimsical feeling steal 
through her. A very, very big step for the 
very, very impersonal Anthony! No wonder 
he had sworn so roundly at her this morn 
ing. 

"What s wrong, Mr. Boscoe; don t you 
like my kitchen door?" she asked sweetly. 

Anthony gritted his teeth together and 
then rose from his chair and strode over 
to her. Taking her by the shoulders, he 
shook her slightly. "What is that . . . 
that bounder to you?" His voice was 
shaking with anger, his brown eyes nar 
rowed and enraged. 

Mary wrigged free and shook her finger 
at him. "Now, now, Mr. Roscoe, you ll get 
blood pressure or something. What is Bill 
to me? Why, let me think now. Yes, I m 
very fond of Billy. Very fond, indeed . . . 
he doesn t swear, either." She looked 
pensively at Tony and then added as if 
in afterthought: "He lives here." 

"L lives here," stuttered Tony almost 
inaudibly. He walked away from her and 
flung himself into a chair. "Then, then 
. . .t" 

"Then what?" asked Mary, enjoying 
herself. 

"Oh, nothing," answered Tony tiredly. 
Let s talk about work, Miss Smith. We 



must get that Government quotation off 
this afternoon, you know, and . . ." 

Mary interrupted him: "No, don t let s 
talk about work, Tony; let s talk about 
my brother. It has occurred to me that 
you don t like him. Whyt" 

"Your brother!" echoed Tony. He 
bounded out of his chair and reached Mary 
as if under jet propulsion. He took her 
by the shoulders again and pulled her up 
gently. "Darling, it has been a hellish 
half -hour!" He put his finger under Mary s 
chin and tilted her face up. "I thought 
that bounder might have had first claim 
on you." 

"He s not a bounder," said Mary indig 
nantly. "You shouldn t jump to conclu 
sions. He has known for ages about you. 
I mean, that I was . . ." she paused and 
began studying the pattern of Tony s tie. 

"That you were what, darling!" Tony s 
eyes were smiling down a-t her through his 
newly donned rose-coloured glasses. As 
Mary was more than presentable in any 
light, he found the result devastating. 

Mary sighed. "In love with you, of 
course, you, you so and so . . ." She was 
unable to say any more, as Tony s arms 
closed around her and he began kissing her 
as though he meant it. A little later, 
when he came up for breath, he said: 
"Well, maybe it is just as well that I re 
cognized it as love at this stage, honey, 
otherwise there is no telling what language 
I might have ended up using!" 



Unprogressive. 

What will baj pen to a society that is 
getting older 1 ^hall we not become nn- 
progressive falling behind in technical 
efficiency and in intellectual and artistic 
achievement? 

The danger of becoming a "dull" natiom 
is apparently a very real one. Seven scien 
tists all renowned names have told a 
medical commission that the majority of 
intelligent children come from small fami 
lies and the dull ones from larger families. 
A part of intelligence is said to be in 
herited; the brighter the parents the 
brighter the children. 

What happens if the fall in birthrate it 
most noticeable among the more intelligent 
people. 

That is a problem the world has to face. 
It is the more intellectual people that have 
small families, and owing to the high cost 
of living, and crushing taxation, there 1* 
no encouragement to the couple who would 
like to have a large family. Scientists may 
prate about these things, but so long a* 
extravagance politicians with dreanjy 
socialistic ideas, and plenty of taxation 
monies to spend, hold sway, just so long 
will it be for the community to get into * 
right way of thinking, and return back to 
the simple way of life. Taxation does not 
make for progress. The only way is 1m- 
dustriousness and increased production, is 
which the whole of the community brigkt 
folks and dull folks can share. 



"The men who are lifting the world up 
ward and onward are those who encourage 
more than criticise." Elizabeth Harrison. 



"And, having thus chosen our course, let as 
renew our trust in God and go forward 
without fear and with manly hearts." 
Abraham Lincoln. 



Ah! that s the way 

scones and pastry 

should taste 



ALWAYS USE 




Ask for all the Aunt Mary s. Pure Food Products 




14 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



Put Yourself in Fine Shape 
for the New Year . . 



Brassieres 
Ber\ei 



bY 



If you re to cut a dashing 
figure the whole year thru 
you ll need the perfect fit, com 
fortable support and lovely 
line of a Brassiere by Berlei. 
Illustrated are: 



TOP: "Hollywood-Maxwe! " by 
Berlei. V/hir/poo! Stitching. 
\ Price, 17/-. 

RIGHT: "Co-itro-Bra" by Berlei 
for heavier figures. Prices, 21/6 
to 31/6. 

CENTRE: Longer-line Holly- 
wood-Maxwell" ior four bus, 
shapes. Prices, 10/9 to 29/6. 

LEFT: "Off-the-Shoulder" Brc 
" shadow face. Price, 25/6. 




Always insist on a Brassiere by 



Don t buy a Bra anywhere 




. 
-hut in a fitting room 



B65.I8 



ARE YOU SLOWLY 
POISONING YOURSELF? 

Remove the Cause 

WHEN waste matter la allowed 
to accumulate in the colon It has 
three- effects. It weakens tha 
muscular power of the body to 
remove It. It creates poisonous 
product* which through the cir 
culation reach every cell In the 
body. It forms a breeding- 
grround for germs by the mil 
lions. That Is the reason high 
authority to-day regards consti 
pation as primarily responsible 
for eighty-five cases in every 
hundred of serious illness. Way 
pnedalisr* all over the world 
have made Internal cleanness 
their slogan. 

Coloseptie overcome* the pos 
sibility of Autoxima from tk 
words ante, (soif), toxin (poisosi) 
by inducing better Intern*! 
Cleanness. 

Coloseptlc Is the nroduct of in 
tensive research to find a remedy 
which would combat constipa 
tion at its source the colon 

A level teaspoonfvl in a ykut 
of water morning or night, one* 
or twice a week, is sufficient after 
perfect relief is obtained 

COLOSEPTIC 

FOR BETTER 
INTERNAL CLEANNESS 

At ail chemUts and stores. 



LEARN 




It s "Quicker - 

under MO NET -BACK 
GUARANTEE with 
Sampson Home-Study 
course for: 

* STEEL GCITAB 

* HUl-bllly Guitar 

* Banjo Mandolin 

* Piano Accordion 

* Saxophone 

* Clarinet * Ukulele 

* Mouth Organ 

* Button Accordion 

* Violin * Piano 

5000 have mcceeded 
why not YOU? 
It takes 3 Lesson* l 
play first piece 10 
Lessons a variety, and 
20 Lessons any plec* 
It doesn t matter where 
you live. 

Instruments. Exclusive model* 
available on small paymentt to any 
part of Australia Fielght paid. 

Free. Illustrated catalogue and dea- 
crlptlve booklet FREE Write for your*. 
IMENTION INSTRUMENT FAVORED! 

SAMPSONS. Dept.2A481 Kent Su, 

Box 4184X. G.P.O., Sydney. 



ARE YOU OVERWEIGHT? 

To be overweight U old-fashioned makes you 
look years older get rid of it by my perfect 
method no dangerous dieting, no irksome exor 
cises. Slimness restored even in cases of long 
standing "fat" condition. Everyone treated for 
their own particular needs. Special treatments 
for men and women of all ages. 
Send 6d. in stamps for particulars to 
MATRON MARION GOSS, Dosk J, 
Box 32, P.O. Crow s Nest, Sydney. 

"We always love those who admire us, 
and we do not always love those whom we 
admire/ ^ La Bochefoncanld. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



15 



Add the Charm of Cace 



^ O-f JH-O-O "HJKH* 

This matching set is so delicate and fresh it looks like finest 

lace, and is easily removed for washing. Enhances the plainest 

of frocks. 

Materials: 2 balls of crochet silk or cotton; a No. 1} crochet 
Iiook; 1} yards of ^-inch velvet ribbon. 

Measurements: Neck edge of collar, 14 inches; cuffs, 7 inches. 

Abbreviations: Ch., chain; d.c., double crochet; tr., treble; 
d.tr., double treble; tr.tr., triple treble (3 over needle); quad.tr., 
quadruple treble (4 over needle) ; rep., repeat. 

Collar. 

Work 136 eh. 

1st row: Miss first 3 ch., then work 1 tr. into each ch. to end, 
turn with 3 ch. 

2nd row: Miss 1st tr., 1 tr. in each of next 2 tr., * 2 ch., miss 
next tr., 1 tr. in each of next 6 tr.; rep. from *, finishing 3 tr., 
instead of 6 tr., turn with 3 ch. 

3rd row: Miss 1st tr., then work 1 tr. into each tr. and 3 tr. 
into each space, tarn with 3 ch. 

4th row: Miss 1st tr., 1 tr. in each of next 6 tr., * 2 ch., misa 
next tr., 1 tr. in each of next 11 tr.; rep. from *. finishing with 
6 tr., instead of 11 tr., turn with 3 ch. 

5th row: Miss first 6 tr., * then into next space work (1 d.tr., 

2 ch., 1 tr.tr., 2 ch., 1 quad.tr., 2 ch., 1 tr.tr., 2 ch., 3 d.tr.), 3. 
ch., miss next 5 tr., 1 d.c. into next tr., 3 ch.; rep from *, finish 
ing 1 d.c. in last tr., turn with 1 ch. 

6th row: * Work 4 d.c. into 1st space, (into next space work 

3 ch., 3 d.c.) 4 times, 3 ch., 4 d.o. in next space (this completes 
one point), rep. from * to end. Fasten off. 

Cuffs. 

Work 64 ch. 

1st row: Miss first 3 ch., then 1 tr. in each ch. to end, turn 
with 3 ch. 

2nd row: Miss 1st tr. in each of next 5 tr., * 1 ch., miss next 
tr., 1 tr. in each of next 6 tr.; rep. from *, finishing with 5 tr., 
instead of 6 tr., turn with 3 ch. 




3rd row: Miss 1st tr., work 1 tr. in each tr., and 1 tr. in each 
*h. space, turn with 3 ch. Now work 4th, 5th and 6th rows as 
given for collar. Thread ribbon through Lol^s in collar arr! 
cuffs. Neaten ends on cuffs. 



COTTIB 



o-SS-o <x H&-00 <-S3-*- 

Materials: i oz. black 4-ply wool, small quantity filiiijg, two 
bone knitting needles No. 12, crochet hook and a small thread 
white wool, i yard ribbon. 

Abbreviations: K., knit; p., purl; tog., together; sts., stitches. 

Commence by casting on 1 st. for the nose; then knit 3 sts. 
into this st. Continue in stocking-st., increasing 1 st. at both 
ends of the needle every second row until there are 7 sts., purl 
back, increasing 1 st. at end of purl row (8 sts.); leave on a 
spare needle. 

Cast on 8 sts. for leg. 

Row 1 Knit. Row 2 Purl. 

Repeat these two rows four times more and break off wool, 
and push along to end of needle. Cast on 8 sts. and work 
exactly the same for the 10 rows; then knit one row, cast on 
11 sts.; then k. the 8 sts. from the spare needle; then purl back 
across all the sts. (27 sts.). 

Work four rows in stocking-st.; then increase in last st. of 
next knit row. and purl back. Repeat the last two rows once. 

Knit the 29 sts. now; then take the spare needle containing 
the 8 sts. for head and knit across these ats., increasing 1 st. 
at end of the row: then purl back and shape as follows: 

Row 1 K. 11, cast off 6 sts., k. to last st., k. twice into this 
end st. 

Row 2 Purl to last 2 sts., p. 2 tog. 

Row 3 K. 2 tog., k. to last st., k. twice into end st. 

Repeat rows 2 and 3 once, then row 2 once. Now decrease 
1 st. at both ends of the needle of the head part every row until 
there aro 9 sts.. then at both ends of every knit row and begin 
ning only of every purl row until there are 3 sts; then k. 1. k. 2 
tog. and pass the Irnitted st. over the k. 2 tog. Break off wool. 
Return to remaining 11 sts., join wool and cast off 2 sts., then p to 
end of row. Now shape as follows for the tail: K. 7, k. 2 tog., 
turn and cast off 2 sts., p. to last 2 eta., p. 2 tog. 

In the next row k. 3, k. 2 tog.; then continue ou these 4 st8. 
for 9 rows; then k. 1, k. 2 tog., p. the knitted st. over the k. 2 
tog. and cast off remaining st. 

To mnke the other half, work exactly as given until you have 
worked the fonr rows of stocking-st. after conned ing the legs, 
then make all the shapings at opposite ends of the row. 

The tinder-piece of legs and body are made by working for 
legs and body until you have worked three rows in stocking-st. 
after connecting the legs. Cast off in the 4th row. 
Head Piece. 

Cast on 1 st. and knit; work 3 sts. into this st.. then increase 




1st. at both ends of next row (5 sts.). Continue in stocking-st. 
on these 5 sts. for 46 rows, then k. 2 tog. at both ends of the 
needle every 2nd row twice. Break off wool and darn end in 
neatly. 

Ear. 

Cast on 7 sta. and knit three rows: then k. 2 tog. at both ends 
of the needle every 3rd row until 3 sts. remain, k. 1, k. 2 tog., 
pass knitted st. over. Cast off remaining st. and darn end of 
wool in neatly. Make other ear the same. 

To Make Up. 

Press a.11 pieces carefully, then cut out the shape in black 
material (non-fraying), allowing | inch turning. Oversew all 
the pieces together, inserting the head piece from chest over top 
of head to beginning of back. Leave the underseam open and 
pnd well. Sew the wool piooes into shape and t<lip the padded 
Scottie inside. Sew ears in position and make the eyes by 
making 3 ch., work 3 double crochet into the 1st ch., then con 
tinue round and round twice. Sew one each side of head, and 
tie ril.bon round neck. 



16 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



With the pace of things to 
day all the strain and bustle 
headaches teem to be on 
the Increase. The fact that 
they are caused largely by 
the modern tempo and diffi 
culties of the times it all the 
more reason why Aspro Is 
THE way to stop these head 
aches. 



ASPRO 1 has MO "AFTER 

1 EFFECTS" (doesn t stow you 
. up, leave 
pressed) 



ASPRO DOES NOT HARM HEART 
OF? STOMACH (ca 1 on Aipro as 
often as you need without the 
slightest fear. It It a!o non habit- 



ASPRO- ACTS SWIFTLY 
( Ascro nas to be effective to 
have the biggest tale in the 
world of any medicine of iU 
kind). 




DOES NOT HARM THE HEART OR STOMACH 
Try ASPRO Tablets 
with your cup of tea! 



Wr>er s.->i, s ?>work makes you feel jadeii, nerve 
racked and t headachy," try ASPHO 1 "AND 
A CUP OF TEA. The Aspro soothes and 
ealms you the tea gives you a lift, tt t a 
wonderful combination every housewife should 
know. 




FORD PILLS 




Jack -J Sprat 

spread wSen he sat, 
He puffed and he huffed 

all the way; 

But he s found a new life 
Since his wise little wife 
Gives him Ford Pills 

every day. 

Ford Pills are the gentle, 
taste!ess, painless laxative for 
ail your family. In plastic 
tubes, 2/6 everywhere. r . P .,, 



FORD PILLS 



all the best 

brushes 

are 




bristled 



R13-3 



DRINK HABIT 
DESTROYED 

Do you suffer through the curse of 
excessive drinking? EUCRASY has 
changed homes from misery and 
want to happiness again. Established 
52 years it destroys all desire for 
Alcohol. Harmless, tasteless, can be 
given secretly or taken voluntarily. 
State which required. 

SEND 20/- FULL TWENTY 

DAYS COURSE. 
DEPT. B, EUCRASY CO. 

297 Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



"An expert is a person who avoids the 
small errors as he sweeps on to the grand 
fallacy." Benjamin Stolberg. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



17 



Frock, 7400 Is. 6d. 
4J yds. 36 ins. wide 

Contrast : 
I yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Skirt cut on bias. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



Frock, 7431 Is. 6d. 
4 yds. 36 ins. wide. / 
32 to 40 ins. bust. ( 



Pipestem lines characterise Castillo s 
collection which includes a number of 
slim dresses. Shorter than last season, 
these are narrow and draped at the front, 
back or sides, while for evening he 
shows a new ankle-length silhouette 
which is fitting to the knees whence it 
flirts out into pleated ruffles at the back. 
Short bright coats are a feature and one 
in butter yellow with an enor 
mous swing is typical. 

Skirts and necklines sweep de 
finitely to one side in the Hattie 
Carnegie collection, even in her 
young and dashing suits which 
are mainly in dark grey or 
honey flannel and have un 
expected low cut necklines. 





House Frock, 7422 Is. 6d 

3| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



Frock, 7403 Is. 6d. 

3| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes , stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal" 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.] 



Australian Home Journal. January 2, 1950 




From New York. 

All kinds of light weight fabrics of infinite variety make a 
host of distinguished models at New York fashion shows, with 
Adrian, whose collection is full of life and excitement, pre 
senting a group of suits and frocks. Designed with slim 
skirts, these have hip-length jackets softly- fastened with a 
string tie at the waist, and he often uses stripes of different 
lengths to point up their lines. Black stripes and angles on 
tawny grounds suggesting Navaho Indian designs are among 
his favourites too, and he effectively combines black and 
white checks of varying sizes in one three-piece ensemble. 
In contrast, his evening gowns are pretty and delicate, 
notably the sheer wool dinner dresses in pale 
colours worn with nun-like caps. 

Dressmaking Details. 

Dressmaking detail including embroidery, 
bands of tucking, slot-seaming and faggotting ; ; 
plays a big part in Sally Milgrim s suits. She, 
uses luscious-coloured wools for soft suits. 




Frock, 7429 Is. 6d. 

4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Lace, i yd. 36 ins. wide. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 






Suit, 7421 Is. 6d. 

4| yds. 36 ins. wide 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 





Matron s Frock, 
7425 Is. lOd 
yds. 36 ins. wide 

34 to 48 ins. bust. 



Frock, 7430 Is. lOd. 

4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



19 



It is the junior departments carrying high priced 
merchandise that report highly styled fashions sell 
ing well. Customers for the medium and lower 
priced clothes are more conservative and a little 
timid in their choice, purchasing styles they have 
been in the habit of wearing. It is this latter group 
that buyers will concentrate on " educating." 

Story Styles. 

A series of Story Book Fashions in pinafores is to 
be noted. Embroidered on white broadcloth, Jack 
and Jill, the Cow that Jumped Over the Moon, 
Little Red Riding Hood, and the Old Woman Who 
Lived in the Shoe, all tell their stories in gaily 
colored thread on the front panels of the princess 

line pinafores. , , , A0f , , , 

Blouse, 11,485 Is. 3d 

If yds. 36 ins. wide 
32 to 40 ins. bust. 




Junior Modes. 

Junior size customers are grad 
ually becoming educated to the 
longer lengths, hip fulness and 
rounded shoulder lines of the 
new dress silhouette. They have 
given complete approval to the 
ballerina skirt and tiny waist look, 
retail store buyers report. 

For the most part it is the 
popular priced junior depart 
ments that are having the most 
trouble selling the new styles. 
Customers still look a trifle ask 
ance at long skirts and full hips. 
As in the better priced depart 
ments they want strapless evening 
gowns, preferably ballet length 
and hooded, flared coats. Tail 
ored, classic cut suits with button 
treatment sell better than the 
dressy styles at popular prices. 

Skirt, 12,197 Is. 3d 
2$ yds. 36 ins. wide 
27 to 35 inches waist 



Blouse, 11,495 Is. 3d. 



If yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Long sleeve yd. extra. 



32 to 40 ins. bust. 



Blouse, 11,494 Is. 3d 

If yds. 36 ins. wide. 

32 to 40 ins. bust. I 




c 

Skirt, 12,195 Is. 3d| 
3| yds. 36 ins. wide! 
27 to 35 inches waist. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payne" must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal" 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, Iff. extra.] 



1500 FREE Books on Dancing 



MOW you can test this wonderful course on 
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dancers and bad dancers miss all th 
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taking advantage of Professor Bolot s 
wonderful offer but, hurry, this offer 
is limited. 





Professor J Eolot, F.A.R., 

French Dancing Academy. 

Sfjdio 44, Oxford St.. Sydney. 

Dear Sir, Flpiie send me by return post your FREE Book | 
"DANCING AS A FINE ART." (Enclose 2Jd. in stamps), j 

NAME _ J 

ADDRESS 



L. 



.l-l- SO. 



What this FREE 
Book Discusses 

How to Learn it Home. 

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How to be Popular. 

How to Imp rcve Conversation. 

How to be a Perfect Dancer. 
Cof ies of this famcus Book will 
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your copy. 

PROF. J. BOLOT 

Studio 44 

OXFORD ST., SYDNEY, 



YOU CAN MAKE IT YOURSELF 




Complete instructions with colour 
card for this summer-weicjht 
woollen blouse are found in the 
LORNA ROSE "Needlecraft 
Book No. 14" 18 pages of 
delightful patterns for knitted, 
crocheted, embroidjred and 
tapas.ry work, including th 
popular hat, bag and in 
gloves sec |/JJ 

All materials for any of the 
patterns are obtainable from 
Lorna Rose. The blouse shown 
s mads from Munrospun (Reg d) 
2-ply "Morning Haze" wool, 
ideal for summer wear. Obtain 
able in Australia only 4(1/11 
from Lorna Rose for | U/ I I 



POST 
FREE 



LORNA ROSE NEEDLECRAFT 

P.O. BOX 11, DULWICH HILL, 
SYDNEY 

Iso at M, Her Majesty s Arcade. (Pitt St. level) 





MAN WORKED OVERTIME 
WHILE LEG HEALED 

Varex Treatment has been quite suc- 

cessful on that bad leg of mine a miracle 

in fact. In five weeks the wound healed 
up completely and I never lost an hour * 
work from the first day. In fact, I have 
been working overtime on it three days 
week. I have not failed to tell people of 
your simple and cheap cure." Write 
to-day for free Varex Booklet. Ernest 
Healey, Pharmaceutical Chemist, Varex, 
Rooms 523-524, 5th Floor, St. Jame 
Building, 109W Elizabeth Street, Sydney. 



"Iron Starvation" is 
often the cause of lack 
of energy, anaemia and 
that run-down feeling. 
Iron "Jelloirls" provide, 
in an easy-to-take form, 
the iron needed to build 
up rich, red blood. 



Irbh 
Jelloids 



Caring for Glasses. 

Suggestions from the Department of 
Agriculture on caring for the glassware 
that gets extra heavy use in summer: 

In washing or rinsing tumblers, lay them 
in hot water rather than running it on 
them. Pour hot drinks slowly on to ice 
rather than against the glass. Never put 
glasses that have just come cold from the 
refrigerator into warm dishwater. All this 
to avoid sudden damaging temperature 
changes. 

The less handling, the less chance of 
breaking. The new sudless detergents 
leave glasses streaklces and eliminate 
wiping. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



21 



At a recent display of young folks 
fashions custom-fashioned styles in 
cluded white organdies, crisp cotton 
jumpers, and Christmas party frocks 
trimmed with hand embroidery and 
dainty lace. Blue, green and pink 
cotton dresses have smocked bodices 
gathered skirts, big bow sash backs, 
brief puffed sleeves, and white 
collars and cuffs. There were 
white organdy dresses with 
short pUiTed sleeves, and big 
bow sashes edged with em 
broidery. Assorted pastel cot 
ton jumpers were displayed 
with white dotted Swiss blouses 

Brilliant Accessories. 

Brilliance is emphasised in 
matching and contrasting ac 
cessories for day and evening 
scarfs Printed silk and wool 
scarfs, with multicolour se 
quin trim, are strongly repre 
sented on day and evening 
fashions. Shoulder strap and 
top handle bags are shown in 
a wide range of leathers and 
rich fabrics. A small 
shield-shaped French bro 
cade evening bag has a 
long silk cord that serves 
as a shoulder strap 





About Hats. 

Every silhouette is supple, or 
draped, or manipulated. 

* * * 

Top milliners give importance to 
the wide, fluid brim for evening. 

* * * 

The slanted or profile line 
launched in Paris in January- 
continues in all shapes. 



Tricornes are the newest 
late summer silhouettes. 
* * * 

Colours are lush and varied 
and have depth through the 
choice of media. This includes 
velours, silky napped felts, hat 
ter s plush, solcil- velours, 
velvets. 



Blouse and Skirt, 
9959 Is. 3d. 
10, 12, 14 years. 
Blouse : 

\l yds. 36 ins. wide 
Skirt : 

3 yds. 54 ins. wide 
Skirt cut on bias. 



College Frock, 9372 Is. 3d. 

4, 6, 8 years. 

Blouse, 1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Tunic, U yds. .54 ins. wide. 




College Frock, 9371 Is. 6d 

10, 12, 1 4 years. 

Blouse, 1? yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Tunic, 2J- yds. 54 ins. wide. 

Also 32, 34. 36 ins. bust. 




Blazer, 9327 Is. 3d. 

2,4,6,8, 10, 12, 14 years 

2 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Also in Ladies sizes. 

Hand smocking and French 
shirring are displayed in a 
number of showrooms and 
characterize the line of woven 
ginghams and fine count 
broadcloth and balloon cloth in 
sizes 1 to 3 and 3-6. Unusual 
stripes are included in the 
gingham groups and striped 
piping on the Peter Pan collars 
matches up with the dress 
fabric. 



Blouslips are the keynote at an 
other store. Peasant types, with 
drawstring necklines and embroid 
ery and Peter Pan collar with em 
broidered panel down the front are 
the blouse styles attached to a full 
skirt which serves as a slip. The 
bottom of the slip is ruffled . 
* * * 

Jumper Dresses represent an 
other accepted type, sponsored all 
the way all the line up to the teen 
age group. Navy blue, the undis 
puted favourite in this type, usually 
worn with white blouses, again with 
puffed sleeves. 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, \%d. extra.] 



22 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 




Just as the name Paul Storr stands for excellence in 
silver craftsmanship, so the name Goddard s stands 
for excellence in silver polishes. Australian house 
wives will we come the return of these fine polishes 
to restore the beauty of their silverware. 



Goddard s Silver Polishes 



Plate Powder Silver Polish 



Silver Clolhs 






tf/Vew Zealand delicacy . . . 

From the crystal-clear streams of New Zealand come WHITEBAIT tiny 
inch-iong fish, the most delicately flavoured in the world. ST. GEORGE 
retains the full freshness and unique flavour of Whitebait by quick 
canning and provides you with a special treat for every occasion. Serve 
St Gaorqe Whitebait to your guests and your family it s delightful. 

At all leading 
Australian Stores 




ST. GEORGE 

WHITEBAIT 






Durvedin New Z.^a 




It is said that every man expects bis 
wife to be a sweetheart, a valet, a chef, an 
audience and a trained nurse. 

Now we hear from the female of the 
species: A woman should have five hus 
bands: an intellectual companion, a muscu 
lar toiler, a financial genius, a practical 
plumber and electrician and one romantic 
playboy. 

"There never was a bad man that had 
ability for good service." Burke. 



"Merchants who keep their business well 
in hand, sell for cash and pay for goods at 
short time, taking advantage of all cash 
discounts, and give strict attention to 
business, rarely fail." Marshall Field. 



"Whatever the number of a man s 
friends, there will be times in his life 
when he has one too few; but if he has 
only one enemy, he is lucky indeed if he 
has not one too many." Bulwer-Lytton. 



PUSSY RATTLE 



Ataterials: 1 oz. 3-ply white wool; 2 amber 
glass buttons for eyes; 1 corset steel, 
paper-covered, 12 inches long and ^ inch 
wide, for handle; a little pink wool, or a 
thread of pink embroidery silk, for nose 
and mouth; 16 inches of pale blue satin 
ribbon, 1 inch wide, for pussy s bow: 1 
pair of No. 14 knitting needles; some stiff 
white cardboard; a few clean white bristles 
for whiskers and eyebrows. 

Mark two circles, each 3 inches in dia 
meter, on the cardboard. Inside these 
circles make another circle } inch across 
and cut out to make a hole. Cut around 
the larger circles. Place one on top of 
the other. Break off about a yard of 
wool, thread on coarse needle and proceod 
to wind over the cardboard. When this 
thread is iisrd. take another and continue 
winding until the hole is filled. With sharp 
scissors cut around edge, slipping the 
points of the scissors between the two 
cards. 




lake very strong cotton or thin, soft 
twine (never use wool), and wind it 
around the wool between the cards. Make 
two winds, each time pulling as tightly as 
possible. Tie with reef knot, make an 
other wind and tie at a point opposite the 
first tie. Cut off cotton, but not too close 
to knot. Tear away the cardboard gently. 

With very sharp scissors trim the result 
ing ball of wool into the semblance of a 
kitten s face. It is not as difficult as you 
imagine. 

Sew eyes in place, taking the thread 
from side to side and fastening off at the 
tie. Embroider nose and mouth. Add 
whiskers and eyebrows. 
Ears. 

With 3-ply wool cast on 18 sts. 

K. 2 rows. 

Then work in stocking-stitch for 4 rows, 
keeping 2 ste. at each end in garter stitch. 

7th row K. 2, tnke 2 tog., work to 
within 4 sts. of end of row, take 2 tog., 
k. 2. [Turn to page 25.] 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



23 



Frock, 90231 Id. 

6 and 8 years. 
yds. 36 ins. wide. 




Slim Skirts. 

The question of skirt fulness is being 
discussed with more assurance than 
earlier in the season. The all-round 
pleated skirt is already in demand by 
buyers for high fashion stores, and the 
indications are that they will play it 
strongly in promotions, especially in 
junior sizes. Skirts having concealed 
fulness in back or front and hanging 
straight from the hips will be recurrent in 
misses dresses. However, the two-piece 
suit dress in both 

casual and dressy 
fabrics will invariably 
have a straight skirt 
Panel effects are in 
creasing in favour, 
and some will be lined 
with a contrasting 
color or fabric 



Frock, 9087 Is. 3d. 

6 and 8 years. 
1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Contrast : 
I yd. 36 ins. wide. 

Children s Dresses. 

The prints and the stripes the jumper 
dresses and the two-piece suits which have 
been taking honours in children s wear depart- 
ments this summer are taking the honours now 
in fashions. There was ample evidence of this 
at a recent Saturday matinee which had the 
type of show that always draws a lively audience 
of young customers, some of them very young in 
deed. The pink dresses made the most em 
phatic impression among the 7 s to 14 s in Sat- 
audience at the ballet. When the lights went 
up at intermission time, the pinks flamed up 
all over the big theatre from orchestra to 
balcony, and worn by all ages. Favourite 
silhouette in these dresses is identified as 
that with square-necked puff-sleeved 
top, full skirt and self sash tied in a bow 
at back. . . these bow-backs made 
a pretty picture in the parterre 
boxes when their young wearers 
sat with their back to the audience 
during the intermissions. 



Frock, 9011 Is. 3d. 

16 to 18 years. 

32 inches bust. 
4 yds. 36 ins. wide. 



Blues and yellows are next in 
line in the accepted pastels, defi 
nitely not so popular as pink and 
just as definitely worn by the 
very youngest members of the 
audience. 




-Frock, 9929 l. w 
12 and 14 years. 
2| yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Contrast:! yd. 36 ins. wide 



[We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Postage on each Pattern, ld. extra.] 



24 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



Men s Shirt, 7013 Is. 3d. 

3 yds. 36 ins. wide. 

Neck sizes, 14J, 15i,16J in > 

Also Boys sizes, 4 to 14 yrs. 




Summer Colours 

Pastels for summer are based on 
sweetpea colours, including pinks, 
mauves, reds and yellows and the 
absence of the light blues is marked. 
Grey, ranging from the light pearly 
shades to darker elephant and mole 
is the leading neutral, while only the 
darker shades of blue including navy 
are featured. Brown and beige ^ 
shades include spice and to- jf 
bacco, tortoiseshell, amber 
topaz and nut-brown. 
True yellow, including 
everything from soft straw 
shades to bright canarv. 
holds an important 
place and emphasis 
is on reds and 
pinks with a yel 
low tinge. 




Men s Underpants, 

9604 Is. 3d. 
1| yds. 36 ins. wide. 
Waist sizes, 30 to 42 ins. 




Pyjamas, 9452 Is. 3d. 

4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 years. 

3| yds. 36 ins. wide. 




Pyjamas, 9169 Is. 3d 

2 and 4 years. 
2 yds. 36 ins. wide. 



jamas, 9102 Is. 3d. 

2 and 4 years. 
2 yds. 36 ins. wide. 



I We supply Paper Patterns for all designs illustrated. Payment must be in postal notes, stamps will not be accepted. 
"Australian Home Journal," 407-409 Kent Street, Sydney, N.S.W. . Postage on each Pattern, \{d. extra.} 



nome ""Journal, January 



i 5TF 



29 



PUSSY RATTLE. 

[From page 22.] 

Work 2 rows without decreasing.* 

Eepeat these 3 rows until there are 8 sts. 

Next row K. 1, p. 2 tog. (twice), k. 1. 

Next row K. 2 tog. (twice), (2 sts. left 
on needle). 

Next row 8. 1, k. 1, p.s.s.o. Break wool 
and pull end through. Fasten off ends. 

Make another ear to match. Brush ears 
lightly with teazle brush. Gather ears at 
base and sew firmly to head. 
Ruff. 

Take a piece of stiff cardboard measur 
ing 4 inches by 2$ inches. Wind wool 
three times along the length of the card 
board (about 90 winds). 

Thread needle with strong cotton. Secure 
thread with one or two buttonhole stitches 
at upper right-hand end of the wool on the 
card. 

Then run needle under the folds, making 
sure that you catch all the strands. Draw 
up to } inch, then fasten thread. 
Handle. 

Bend the steel to form a loop at one 
end, leaving 2J inches projecting at the 
other end. Secure temporarily with a few 
winds of wool. By leaving it thus bent 
you will find that it will remain in shape 
when you wish to wind the handle. 

Afterwards unfasten the wool tie, and 
wind handle with wool or ribbon, first 
smearing a little synthetic glue at com 
mencing end. This will prevent slipping. 

Wind smoothly and tightly until you are 
within 1 inch of where you are making the 
loop. Bend the commencing end until it 
lies flat against the handle and bind the 
two together very tightly for 1 inch. Con 
tinue winding handle to end, first smear 
ing a little glue to hold wool. 
To Make Up. 

Push end of handle up through centre of 
head, taking care not to loosen or displace 
the strands of wool. Sew at top of head 
and at neck end to hold firmly in place. 
Arrange "ruff" around neck and sew 
securely to handle. Wind ribbon twice 
around neck at top of ruff and tie in a bow. 
Secure with a few stitches. Add a jingle 
bell and your rattle is complete. 

You will find that the pliable handle 
makes the head bob most amusingly. A 
quite charming pram toy can be made 
instead of a rattle by omitting the handle 
and fastening a cord, made by crocheting 
or chain of wool to the top of the head. 
This serves to suspend the toy from cot or 
pram. 



A Morning Prayer. 

"The day returns and brings us the petty 
round of irritating concerns and duties. 
Help us to play the man, help us to per 
form them with laughter and kind faces; 
let cheerfulness abound with industry. 
Give us to go blithely on our business all 
this day, bring us to our resting beds weary 
and content and undishonoured; and grant 
us in the end the gift of sleep." Amen. 
Robert Louis Stevenson. 



"I shall pass through this world but 
once. Any good therefore that I can do 
or any kindness that I can show to any 
human being, let me do it now. Let mo 
not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass 
this way again." Anonymous. 



STAMPS NOT ACCEPTED. 

Readers are again reminded that 
we do not take postage stamps in 
payment of pattern orders. Only 
postal notes or money orders will 
be accepted. 



Remove 

FRECKLES PIMPLES 




BLACKHEADS AND ALL 

SKIN IMPERFECTIONS 

QUICKLY BY NEW 

HOME METHOD 

FOR years ! was wqrr-Vd to death with unsightly Freck ei 
and abominable Pimplts and Blackheads. Other girls 
would avoid me. It was impossible for me to attend 
parties and dances, because both sexes would shun ray 
company. 

Whenever I went out I was actually dressed better and 
locked smarter than most other girls, nevertheless I 
always fe 1 miserable. Every crejin and powder and 
lotion that I saw advertised I would try in the hope of 
removing those distressing blemishes, but one and all 
proved failures. 

Eventually I learnt of a simple home treatment from a 
Parisian Beauty Specialist which brought a remarkable 
change and within a month my Friends were remarking 
" how well you look -I would never have known you. 
Realising that there must be thousands of 
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so that you may remove all traces of Freckles, Pimples, 
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method that overcame my troubles. 
Remember, it is different to any that you have adopted in 
the past. It does not consist of cosmetics, creams, lotion*, 
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Please send full details of your method for remoriaf 
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ADDRESS 



H.J. Jan./ 50. 



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FIGURE CONTROL CORSET CO.. 

5th Floor, P.A. Building, 
243 ELIZABETH STREET, SYDNEY. s. 1 



26 



ustralian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 




"Bride For Sale," Hoyt s Attraction 



know what is 
going to happen 
next, and before 
they are aware 
of it they may 
be taking part 
in tbis original 
show. "Okla 
homa" has set a 
new standard 
in stage produc 
tion. Theatre 
goers and the 
press have paid 
it this tribute, 
and all the 
credit goes to 
the producer, 
Ted Hammer- 
stein. Songs, 
interludes, 
dances, ballet 



The Pioy ond Film 



Romance, songs and 
dances, not to mention 
swimming, combine to turn 
out a gay and lilting musi 
cal in M-G-M s new Techni 
color, "Neptune s Daughter," 
at the Liberty and St. 
James , starring Esther 
Williams, Red Skelton and 
Ricardo Montalban, with 
Xavier Cugat and his 
orchestra supplying the 
rumba numbers, as well as 
other sprightly tunes. In 
addition, as supporting 
players, are Betty Garrett 
and comedian Keenan 
Wynn. The story centres 
around Miss Williams in 
the role of a swimming 
champion \vho becomes the 
owner of a bathing suit 
factory, but still finds time to sing several 
numbers and to execute some spectacular 
water ballets. Red Skolton and Betty Gar 
rett pair off in a series of side splitting 
episodes when Skelton, a timid masseur, 
tries, for the benefit of Miss Garrett, to 
pass himself off as the Latin American 
lover. Ricardo Montalban, with disastrous 
results when he finds himself on a polo 
pony. 

* * * 

"Oklahoma," at the Theatre Hojal, is 
filling capacity houses, and the show is> 
just one long exciting thrill right from 
the opening item. The audience doesn t 





Neptune s Daughter," St. James 

numbers, comedy situations 
follow each other so rapidly 
t!<at there is littJe time to 
adequately appreciate cue 
item when the next is in 
full swing. In these days & 
good dancer has to be a 
comedian, tragedian, panto- 
mimest, everything, and 
that is one of the keynotes 
because it is so bewilder 
ing and extraordinary 
of the production. Just 
makes it the sensational 
success that it is. 



"Com in and Per 
formanoe," at the 
Tivoli, is studded 
with some of the 
most amazing, amus 
ing au l artistically 



and Liberty. 



poise, timing and nerve. The three Ganjou 
Brothers and Juanita appear in what is 
described as a Romance in Porcelain, the 
setting being in Sevres china. Juanita 5* 
no porcelain lady: she is flung, swung and 
hung at every conceivable angle and DOS 
ture with amazing skill and apparent 
gentleness by the tftree men. Further en 
thusiasm is created by Ivor Moretoc. antf 
Dave Kaye. Renowned through their re 
cordings, these pianists play practically 
every tune on the latest hit parades iu 
perfect tempo and without the semblance 
of a clash. 

# 

Jolson Sings Again," at the State, is> 
the sequel to "The Jolson Story," and starts 
right off where the first film ended. Open 
ing shows Larry Parks, as Al Jolson, trying 
to convince his wife Julie (Evelyn Keyes) 
that he doesn t really want to sing any 
more that he is happy being a retired 
celebrity. But when thf 
night club crowd roars for 
him to do a number, he 
sings two and then three 
songs. Julie can see how 
happy Al is to sing again 
to those live faces out be 
yond the footlights. So ehf 
leaves the club while Al is 
still singing. When he hur 
riedly follows her home. 
Julie is gone. Al follow? 
her to New York, but can 
not find her. Jolson s come 
back is a smash hit, and 
during the show s run Julie 
sues for divorce. The film 
has more than a wealth of 
incident, and plenty of 
snap and soags galore. "For 
Me and My Girl," "You 
Made Me Love You," 
"When the Red Red Robin, 
U T h e Spaniard Who 
Blighted My Life," etc.; 




"/ was a Male War Bride" Regent. 



beautiful acts that have been seen 
here for a long time. As is nRual. 
the interest centres a great deal 
on the star comedian, Maurice Col- 
loano, who, while oozing a rich and 
unique form of unctious humour, is 
a mixture of acrobat, dancer, con 
tortionist anfl goggle-eyed clown. 
Assisting Maurice Colleano as com 
pere and comedian is Terry Scan- 
Ion, always bright. The Danish 
twins. Krista and Kristel, on a 
trapeze, give an amazing exposi 
tion of strength, allied to perfect 



"Neptune s Daughter," St. James and Liberty. 

all old-timers, but how the younger set will 
appreciate them! 



The crisis that has occurred in the 
British film industry has been threatening 
for quite a long time. With spectacular 
productions costing oodles of money and 
the heavy hand of the entertainment ta* 
clutching solidly into the gross receipts 
something had to burst. With takings of 
27,000,000 and taxes of over 10,000,000 
industry must come to a standstill. The 
Government, which provides no capital and 
accepts no responsibility, takes a far too 
heavy toll from a business which provides 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1930 




Joyce Calleano, Tivoli. 
employment for many thousands 
of workers. Other industries pay 
tax on their profits, but the un 
fortunate film companies pay 
taxes on the total monies re 
ceived. 

* * 

"I Was a Male War Bride," 
at the Regent, has arrived some 
what late, when the public have 
had more than enough of pic 
tures associated with the war. 
This film is built along hilarious 
comedy-romance lines, with 
Cary Grant and Ann Sheridan 
in the leads. Cary plays a French 
Army officer who is assigned on 
a joint mission with Ann, travel 
ing in the sidecar of a motor 
cycle she drives. When at one 
point au accident occurs and he 
tumbles from the speeding 
vehicle in true acrobat fashion. 
Cary cushions the shock by 



diture of thousands of yards of red tape the 
couple get properly married no less than 
three ceremonies required! Made up as a 
WAC by Ann, in order to persuade the Navy 
to let them board the ship together, Cary s 
disguise ie no good when he is drafted to 
assist in Sick Bay. He s escorted to a 
small but comfortable room. When the 
ship s captain approves his papers and 
offers him a cabin with other officers, Cary 
prefers the room he s in with Ann. 
Then he throws away the key so they will 
not be disturbed. 

* * 

"Words and Music," due here soon, has 
aroused a terrific torrent of comment owing 
to the stark force of dancing by blonde 
Vera Ellen and Gene Kelly. Vera appears 
slumberous, st-xy and beautiful, and the 
story dances out in its New York down 
town setting. It could easily become a 
cheap and sordid affair, but the music and 
complex rhythms of the dances so artistic 
ally controlled lifts it right away from the 
usual type of apache dancing. Here is 
how one critic describes the principal 
dance, "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue": "This 





executing a neat barrel 
roll. In another scene 
we have Cary struggling 
on a railroad cross- 
gate which rises with 
him clinging to it, and 
being flung from a ten- 
foot window in a Ger- 



"So Dear to My Heart" May/air. 

is in the modern mood. Basically a blues 
number, it taken the classic Apache dance, 
adds a Frankie-and-Johnme story, puts the 
whole thing into modern rhythm and pro 
duces a aumber that is not quite ballet, 
certaii- ly not straight blues but equally 
certainly fascinating, gripping and wholly 
exciting." 




"Jolton Sings Again" Slate. 
man inn. After a series of more or less 
humorous misadventures the two stars 
arrive at Bad Neuheim in one terrible 
downpour and two terrible tempers. A 
comedy of errors at the inn finally sees 
Cary kicked out of Ann s room and landing 
in abarn with the chickens. After the expen- 



In the little 
Indiana town of 
Fulton Corners, an 
orphrm, Jeremiah 
Kincaid (Bobby 
Driscoll) is being 
reared by his _ 
strict but lov 
able widowed 
grandma, Sa 
mant ha Kin- 
raid (Beulah 
Bondi). Jere 
miah s prob 
lems revolve 
around a 
neglected 
little black 

lamb which he is resolved to keep 
and rear against the practical con 
siderations of his grandma, whose 
hard workaday farm life is upset by 
the arrival of the lamb with its dark 
fleece not marketable. The alterca 
tion between the boy and bis elder 



krisl i and Kristal, Tivoli. 

grows into a conflict of wills, and finally involves 
the whole community before the determined boy 
wins a coveted prize for his pet at the county 
fair and find his character set in "the way the 
twig is bent," to his granny s great and loving 
relief. A simple, delightful story that is essen 
tially human, depicting the 
children s love of animals, a 
trait that ciders too frequently 
misunderstand or do not 
appreciate. 



When a New York firm of in 
come tax consultants hires ii.ii 
ex-major to run their office they 
receive a sbo<^k when the major 
turns up in the shapely form of 
Claudette Colbert, an ex-major 
from the Women s Army Corp?. 
She knows her income taxes and 
also how to run an office. Her 
own idt-a in getting this job is 
to find a ri<-h husband, and what 
better way to land her man than 
to see what his earnings are 
per medium of his income tax 
return? A shrewd and up-to 
date idea. The wealthy pros 
pect, in order to deceive her. 
takes her to a third-class restau 
rant, and then to a wrestling match where 
one of the grunt-and-groaners is thrown 
into her lap. The latter and a sailor join 
the party and the four of them land in 
jail. It s all a great mix-up. The rich 
man thinks this wild party has cured 
Claudette of her crush on him, but he 
doesn t know the girl friend. Plenty of 
variety and a completely new angle on a 
film story. 

* * 

It seems only the other day that Jan i 
Powell was just a very young teen-ager 
doing her stuff with delightful naivette. 
[Turn to page 42.] 




"Olilalioma" Royal. 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



NEW YEAR DRINKS 



Kentucky Cup. 

One cupful orange juice, cupful lemon 
juice, 6 cupsful water, 1 cupful grated pine 
apple, 3 tablespoonsful mint jelly, J cups 
ful sugar. 

Boil the water and sugar till dissolved. 
Cool, add the other ingredients, and chill. 
Serve with a twist of lemon peel and sprig 
of mint in each glass. 



Spiced Cider. 

To 1 gallon sweet cider add 1$ cupsful 
brown sugar, 1 tablespoonful whole all 
spice, 1 tablespoonful whole cloves, $ tea- 
spoonfu-1 salt, dash of cayenne. Boil 15 
minutes. Serve hot. A hospitable drink 
for a cool night. 

Spiced Grapeade. 

Two cupsful grape juice, juice 4 lemons, 
2 cupsful sugar, ^ cupful water, 1 teaspoon- 
ful mixed ground clove, cinnamon, ginger 
and allspice. 

Bring sugar, water and spices to a boil. 
Cool and add other ingredients. Blend 30 
minutes and serve on chopped ice. 







Beat 2 eggs to a froth, stir them in to a 
pint of milk and then add i pint of cream. 
Mix with the coffee, add sugar to taste, and 
stand in the refrigerator for 6 hours. Serve 
with a lump of ice in the jug. 



Mulled Cider. 

To 2 quarts of sweet cider add 1 cupful 
of brown sugar, 2 or 3 pieces of stick cin 
namon, 10 whole cloves, 1 small nutmeg 
and a piece of root ginger. Bring to the 
boiling point, boil at least 10 minutes, and 
serve hot. 



Ruthle s Pet. 

One egg, 1 cupful milk, 1 tableapoonful 
malted cocoa, \ teaspoonful vanilla, dash 
nutmeg. Shake all ingredients with ic, 
except egg white. Beat latter stiff and 
add. 



Backgammon Punch. 

One cupful crushed pineapple, 4 oranges, 
8 lemons, 1J cupsful ginger ale, sugar 
syrup to taste, mint. 

Combine all ingredients and blend. Pour 
over frozen ice-tea cubes or add 1 cupful 
of strong tea, if you are using crushed ice. 

To make iced coffee make a quart of 
strong coffee and allow it to become cold. 



gills 



Amber Frnitade. 

One Ib. sugar, 2 large lemons, 2 
water, 1 grapefruit, 1 orange. 

Measure sugar into a saucepan. Add the 
water. Stir occasionally, till sugar is dis 
solved. Bring to the boil. Boil for 5 min 
utes. Halve the fruit, carefully remove 
pulp and juice, and add to the syrup. Bring 

[Turn to page 32.] 



We re in the 

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LA PAULA 

ART ACADEMY 

SYDNEY . . - MELBOURNE. 
Also Box 1160, Wellington, N.Z. 



LA PAULA ACADEMY. 

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A.H. 1/50 



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a happy baby! 




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healthy, even during the difficult 
teething period by giving Steedman s 
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by mothers for over 100 yearsl 



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FOR THE HAIR 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



29 



KNITTEDS FOR THE SUN 



-A Sun-suit and Cardigan for the Toddler.- 



They make a charming pair for the 2 
to 4 year-old this little sun-auit for warm 
days by the sea or in the garden, and the 
matching cardigan, which can be slipped 
on when there s a cool breeze. The suit has 
a bib front and cross-over straps at the 
back. The little cardigan can be worn 
over blouses or frocks. It looks most effec 
tive in stripes of palest blue and red. 

Materials: 4 ozs. 3-ply wool in red and 
1 oz. in pale blue; 1 pair eac.li of Nos. 10 
and 12 knitting needles; 7 buttons. 

Measurements Cardigan: Length down 
centre front, 11J inches; chest, 22 inches, 
stretching to 23 inches: sleeve seam, 24 
inches. Run-suit: Length from top of bib 




3rd row: K. 17, turn. 
4th row: P. 24, turn. 

5th row: K. 31, turn. Cont. in this man 
ner, working 7 sts. more on next row and 
every following row until the row "p. 66" 
has been worked. Then cont. in st.-st. 
across all eta., inc. 1 st. at both ends of the 
5th and every following 8th row until 
there are 84 sts. on needle. Work 7 rows 
after last inc., finishing at end of a p. row. 
Shape edges of legs. 

1st row: Cast off 3 sts., k. to end. 
2nd row: Cast off 3 sts. purlwise, purl to 
the end of the row. 

3rd and 4th rows: Same as 1st and 2nd 
rows. Now cast off 2 sts. at beg. of every 
row until 24 sts. rem. Work 4 rows 
straight. Now, working into the backs of 
all cast on sts., cont. as follows: 

Cast on 2 sts. at beg. of every row until 
there are 72 sts. Then cast on 3 sts. at 
beg. of next 4 rows, making 84 sts. again. 
Work 6 rows in st.-st., then dec. 1 st. at 
both ends of next and every following 8th 
row until 76 sts. rem. Work 5 rows after 
last dec. 

Change to No. 12 needles and work in 
k. 1, p. 1 rib for 1 inches, finishing after 
a row worked on the wrong side. Work 
bib as follows: 

Change to No. 10 needles. 
1st row: Cast off 12, rib to end. 
2nd row: Cast off 12, rib to end. Now 
proceed in following ptn. : 

1st row: Bib 10 red, join on blue, k. 32 
blue, join on another ball of red, rib 
10 red. 

2nd row: Bib 10 red, p. 32 blue, 
rib 10 red. (Note: Bemember to 
twist the wools when changing 
colours to avoid holes.) 

3rd row: Rib 10 red, k. 32 red, rib 
10 red. 

4th row: Bib 10 red, p 
10 rod. The last 4 rows form the 
bib ptn. Bep. them 9 times more, 
then rep. 1st and 2nd rows once 
more. Break off blue wool and with 
red, rib for 8 rows. 




or. i -i "* luw 

32 red, rib dec> Now 



to crutch, 144 inches; width round widest 
part, 22 inches. 

Abbreviations: P., purl; k., knit; inc., 
increase: st., stitch; cont., continue; st.-st., 
stocking-stitch; beg., beginning; rem., 
remain; dec., decrease; ptn., pattern; alt., 
alternate; tog., together; rep., repeat. 

Tension: 7^ sts. in width and 9 rows in 
depth to 1 inch. 

Sun-suit. 

Begin at the waist by casting on 76 sts. 
with red wool on No. 10 needles. Change 
to No. 12 needles and work in k. 1, p. 1 
rib for 1$ inches. 

Change back to No. 10 needles and shape 
back as follows: 

1st row: K 43, turn. 

2nd row: P. 10, turn. 



Next row: Bib 10, cast off 32, rib 10. 
Cont. in ribbing over the last 10 sts. for 
10 inches. 

Next row: Bib 4, cast off 2 for a button 
hole, rib 4. 

Following row: Bib 4, cast on 2. rib 4. 
Work 1J inches in ribbing and make an 
other buttonhole in the next 2 rows. Work 
3 rows in ribbing and cast off. (Note: The 
2 buttonholes are made so that the straps 
can be adjusted as required.) Join red wool 
to rem. sts., work as first strap. 

The Leg Bands: Join side edges of sun- 
suit. Using a No. 12 needle, pick up and 
draw through 98 sts. all round edge of one 
leg opening. Work in k. 1, p. 1 ribbing 
for 7 rows. Cast off ribwise. Work the 



other leg opening in the same way. (Note: 
If you find it difficult to pick up the sts. 
round the openings, make the bands separ 
ately by casting on 98 sts. on No. 12 
needles and work in ribbing for 7 rows.) 
Cast off loosely with a No. 10 needle. Then 
oversew rather slack ly to leg openings. 

To Make Up. 

Omitting all ribbing, press work on 
wrong side. Join side edges. Sew buttons 
to waist ribbing on back. 

The Cardigan. 

Beg. on the back with red wool and No. 
10 needles, cast on 84 sts. Work in k. 1, 
p. 1 rib for 10 rows. Proceed in following 
striped ptn.: 

1st row: Join on blue and k. to end of 
row. 

2nd row: P. in blue. 
3rd row: Take up red and k. to end of 
row. 

4th row: P. in red. These 4 rows form 
the ptn. Bep. them until back measures 7 
inches from beg. 

Shape Armholes: Cast off 3 sts. at beg. 
of next 2 rows, then dec. 1 st. at beg. of 
every row till 68 sts. rem. Work without 
further shaping till back measures 10J 
inches from beg., finishing after a p. row. 
Shape Back Neck 1st row: K. 22, cast 
off 24. k. 22. Cont. over last set of sts. 
only. Cast off 6 sts. at armhole edge of 
the next 3 alt. rows and 2 sts. at the neck 
edge of the first 2 intermediate rows. 
Fasten off. Join wool to neck edge of 
rem. sts. and complete this side to match. 

Right Front. 

With No. 10 needles and red wool cast 
on 42 sts. and work 10 rows in k. 1, 
p. 1 rib. Proceed in ptn. as on back until 
front measures 7 inches from beg., finish 
ing after a p. row. 
Shape Front and Armhole: 
1st row: Dec. 1 st., and k. to end. 
2nd row: Cast off 3 sts., and finish row. 
3rd row: K. to last 2 sts., dec. 
4th row: Dec. 1 st., and p. to front. 
5th row: Dec. 1 st., and k. to last 2 sts., 
dec. 1 st. at armhole edge on 
next and following alt. row, at the same 
time dec. at front edge on every following 
4th row until 25 sts. rem. This finishes 
armhole shaping, but cont. dec. on every 
following 4th row at front edge until 22 
sts. rem. Work 4 more rows, finishing at 
armhole edge. 

Shape Shoulder: Cast off 7 sts. at armhole 
edge of next 2 alt. rows. Cast off rein. sts. 

Left Front. 

Work exnct.ly the same as right front up 
to armhole, finishing after a k. row instead 
of a p. row. 

Shape Front and Armhole: 
1st row: P. 2 tog., p. to side edge. 
2nd row: Cast off 3 sts., k. to end of row. 
3rd row: P. to last 2., dec. 
4th row: K. 2 tog., k. to end. 
5th row: P. 2 tog., p. to last 2 sts., dec. 
Now work to match right front, but with 
all shapings reversed. 

Sleeves. 

Using red wool nnd with No. 12 needles 
cast on 50 sts. 

Change to No. 10 needles and work in 
k. 1, p. 1 rib for 8 rows. Join on blue and 
work in same striped ptn. as on back, inc. 
1 st. each end of next row and every alt. 
row until there are 70 sts. Work one row 
after last inc. Shape top. Cast off 2 sts. 
at beg. of every row until 30 ets. rem. 
Cast off rem. sts. 

Front Border. 

Using No. 12 needles and red wool cast 
on 10 sts. Work 6 rows in k. 1, p. 1 rib. 

{Turn to page 38.] 



30 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



A TEACHER TAMED 



By G. F SPENCER. 



Colin Agnew had been teaching at Maroiti 
only three days when the trouble started. 
He emerged from the school building at a 
quarter to four dressed for the cold five- 
mile drive to the township of Wesnington, 
where he boarded. Board may have been 
procurable in Maroiti with a little effort, 
but Colin preferred to be spared too close 
a contact with the locals in this, his first 
post after completing his course at the 
Teachers Training College. 

He stopped and stared across the play 
ground to where a tarrying group of young 
sters were having a noisy argument by one 
of the gates. 

As be watched, one of the bigger 
boys, about twelve or thirteen, em 
phasised his point by snatching a 
small flowering plant from a neigh 
bouring bed and swishing its 
earthy roots viciously into the 
face of an opponent. 

Colin s very adequate lungs it! 



and locked it. He said: "You re just the 
unlucky one, I suppose. This is meant for 
a lesson to all the children. They ve been 
getting away with too much far too long. 
Off you go!" 

As the boy made sullenly for the door of 
the classroom, Colin added: "Oh, what s 
your name?" 

"Keith Brunskill. sir." 

The boy gone, Colin sat at his desk for a 
while gazing reflectively at the far wall 
and experiencing a certain regret. Unfor 
tunate that it had to be the chairman s 
son! the man might get the idea his 
action had been a studied one. Colin had 



headmaster to a rural school when there 
was a yoong family which could be rap- 
ported a good deal more economically by 
the move. 

Keith Brunskill was absent next morn 
ing an ominous sign. Colin wasn t at 
all surprised when the distraction of his 
pupils gaze to the glass door of the class 
room showed him the ruddy countenance 
of the committee chairman. With a wave 
of the hand to signify he would come out, 
Colin instructed the classes briefly what 
to do in his absence. He braced himself 
with a deep breath as he opened the door; 
it was good to feel assured there d be no 
wilting under threat. Colin had the 
elements of ringcraft and the inestimable 
advantage of youth. 

Brunskill was staring toward his car by 
the gate when Colin reached the asphalt. 
He turned quickly and advanced with a 
pronounced scowl. 

"What do you 
mean, Agnew, pick 
ing on my boy like 
that in front of all 
the others?" he 
barked in a harsh 
staccato. 

Colin waited 
firmly and met the 
man s angry eyee 
squarely. Brunskill 
must have been all 
of fifteen stone, 




\ 



Colin waited firmly and met the 
man s angry eyes squarely. 



roared across ;; 
the ground: ? !; , 
"Heh! turn that 
up, son!" 

The group of children became instantly 
petrified, gazing with wide eyes as Colin 
strode toward them with a stern, dark 
face. He hadn t previously demonstrated 
his corrective punch. The young culprit 
turned pale and the ill-used plant dropped 
from his fingers. 

Colin said nothing till he got close, then: 
"Nobody does that sort of thing while I m 
teacher in this school, get it?" 

The frightened boy found himself seized 
powerfully by the arm and marched back 
toward the building. In less than a min 
ute, without shedding his leather overcoat, 
Colin was belting him for a maximum six 
with a strap which he felt to be very de 
ficient in length and rigidity. 

Nevertheless, the boy s eyes were watery 
when Colin returned the strap to his desk 



met Sam Brunskill only once, and emerged 
with a jarring sensation. Brunskill was 
too close to his own uncompromising type 
for a peaceful life, he feared. 

Colin Agnew s features were rather use 
ful than ornamental. He had bushy black 
eyebrows, a rather snub nose, wide, reso 
lute mouth, and square chin. The strong 
neck and well knit face maintained the 
same pattern. He sighed and heaved op 
out of the chair to return outside to his 
waiting coupe. The matter was dismissed 
for the time: the next move was up to 
Brunskill. This was one faculty that 
should help him to stand the wear and tear 
of the teacher s life. 

The district of Maroiti was sparsely 
settled, most of the land being suitable 
only for sheep farming. The school had a 
roll of under thirty and was sole charge. 
Colin did not intend to stay in the place 
any longer than necessary; but every new 
trainee had to do his spell in the never- 
never. The smart ones soon wangled a 
city assistant s post and only returned as 



with fists like young 
hams. You couldn t 
call it fat that 
bulged beneath tbe 
white collarless 

shirt which showed under his open suit- 
coat. Colin delayed his reply for good 
men sure. 

Then he said: "Suppose you tell me 
something first, Mr. Brunskill: Why isn t 
Keith at school to-day?" 

A spasm crossed Brunskill s swarthy 
face; his lips twitched. Colin was trigger- 
sensitive to start back-pedalling in the 
No. 1 stage of initial defence. Something 
in his cold eyes must have checked Brun 
skill s impulse. 

His voice shook with outrage, even hate, 
as he growled: "Is that what they teach 
them at Training College these days 
impudence?" 

Nothing in Agnow s demeanour indicated 
that he had heard. After a long half- 
minute, when Brunskill s gaze flickered, 
he said: "I don t know what Keith told 
you, but I wasn t aware when I acted that 
the offender was your son. I don t know 
them all yet. What I saw the boy do de 
served instant punishment, and I gave it 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



31 



tearing a live plaut from the flower bed 
and swinging the roots in another s face. 
A boy that will do a thing like that needs 
watching. Discipline must have been get 
ting slack under the last teacher here." 

Probably Brmiskill had been deceptively 
informed; the aggression was going rapidly 
from his fat-e. He said much more quietly: 
"It s like this, Agnew: I ve only been in 
Maroiti a ye;ir and I was elected chairman 
of the school committee by a one-vote 
majority. I know some of the older settlers 
were upset about it then, and still are. So 
you see what s happened kind of gives them 



something to crow about. They ll probably 
be slinging it up at me." 



to be enjoying a first-class heresy hunt. 
They even objected to his sleeping out of 
the place and tantalised him with offers of 
board. 

Colin felt it was the last straw when 
they insisted that he attend committee 
meetings to answer for his sins; if he 
refused they proposed to take up the 
matters at issue with their Education 
Board member. Owing to the petrol re 
strictions this meant putting in miserable 
hours of waiting between school dismissal 
and the time of meeting at 8 p.m. He 
obstinately refused their invitations to 
tea, believing their motive to he not kindli 
ness but a white-anting 
of his defences. 

At the end of 
three mouths, 
with summer 



her dark eyes were fixed on Colin and the 
red lips had parted expectantly. 

Brunskill seemed casually to have 
noticed. He looked round at Agnew. "Oh, 
some along and I ll introduce you to my 
daughter Gertrude," he said. "She s been 
going to school in town sto ll probably 
be home for a month or two now." 

Colin went along. Brunskill flung open 
the rear door and in a moment Colin s 
manliness was melting in the most heavenly 
pair of eyes he d ever seen. Even aa he 
offered his shaggy hand to her dainty one a 
veering glance took in joyfully the un- 
ringcd fingers of her left hand which, as 
so often happens, rested accommodatingly 
in her lap. , 

Colin couL? not remember afterwards 
the words that passed. He drove to We- 
nington at a fast pace, chafing under a 
sense of outrage when perspective had re 
turned.. That such a creature had to he 
Brungkill e daughter! . . . Yet it wasn t 
surprising: the struc 
tural likeness was there, 
and Brunskill himseli 
had probably been like 




Colin received the line of injured 
innocence sceptically. 

"I m afraid I can t take sides in ? 
local politics, Mr. Briinskill," lie 
said, relaxing his face. "A teacher s gut to 
!>e very careful to avoid any sign of 
favouritism." 

For a moment he thought Brunskill was 
guing to flare up afresh, but. instead he 
tuok a quit k walk to ore side to examine 
a bod of winter carrots nearby. As if by 
mutual consent the talk changed to the 
question of ground improvements; Colin 
was happy in the glow of a tactical victory. 

As Brunskill turned toward the gate he 
ha id: "Keith had a slight temperature this 
morning and didn t feel so well his Ma 
thought he d better stay home. I think 
he ll bo right to-morrow. Anyway, you l! 
get the proper written excuse." 

Colin smiled diplomatically and paid: 
"Very good, Mr. Brunskill," then swung 
back briskly toward the building, thinking 
(hat was a sumptuous sort of car the man 
had down by the gate. Apparently money 
talked, even in Maroiti. 

As Agnew suspected, the chairman had 
only retired to lick his wound. In tiie 
weeks that followed he detected no trace 
of disunity in the committee s harrying 
tactics. No doubt the hot blood of his in 
experience added fuel to the flames, but 
they lost no opportunity of scourging him. 
In fact, the entire neighbourhood seemed 



"Oh, dear Ger 
trude," were the 
only words he 
breathed. 



Approaching, Colin was still defying the 
collective will of Maroiti. The chief suf 
ferers, no doubt, were the youngsters 
trapped between the opposing forces. Then 
Brunskill played his ace. 

He was strangely friendly that after 
noon when he dropped in on the way home 
from Wellington to inquire about a school- 
sweeping difficulty. The scholars had been 
dismissed and it was natural that Colin 
should go down to the road with Brunskill 
afterward. No one was visible in the 
front scat of the closed, five-seater 
"Christy"; somebody might be leaning 
back in the roar seat. 

Brunskill talked fast as they reached 
the gate, and Colin was outside before he 
paused abruptly, staring at the pretty face 
which had appeared at the glass of the 
near door. The young woman had the 
loveliest cream-and-peaches complexion; 



a flashing young god at 
one time. 

One thing was certain: 

progress with Gertrude would entail peace 
with her father and everything he stood 
for complete submission to the inhabi 
tants of Maroiti. Before he slept that 
night Colin breathed tentatively, "So be 
it!" 

Six weeks remained to the summer re 
cess. Brunskiil made the path plain by 
inviting him for a week-end of rabbit- 
shooting a form of entertainment he had 
not previously declined. Colin only pre 
tended to hesitate. From that point the 
committee began receiving all the co 
operation it needed. He even took board st 
the nearest farmhouse so as to attend any 
local dances and ensure that nobody else 
saw too much of Gertrude. The party lines 
hummed with it and Mr. Brunskill was 
allowed to have made good as a school 
politician. 

The long holiday which Colin had been 
anticipating assumed a totally different 
aspect. It would be unwise, he thought, to 
give proof of a major interest in Gertrude 
so soon, but what if his absence gave an 
other his chance? What if Gertrude had 
gone when he returned! He gathered that 



32 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



she was helping with the five younger 
children while Mrs. Brunskill convalesced 
from an illness though the woman 
appeared healthy enough. 

"How long do you expect to be in 
Maroiti?" he asked her at a dance on the 
Saturday night before the break-up. 

"I don t quite know. I ll have to find me 
a job somewhere in Wesnington, if I can." 
She added with a look that gave Colin a 
thrill of encouragement: "I m sure to be 
home for week-ends sometimes, anyway." 

Inexperienced as he was, Colin could be 
excused for embalming the remark in his 
mind. They hadn t reached the stage of 
being alone together and that probably 
saved Colin from drifting into a declara 
tion. With an effort he steeled himself to 
await the new term, so far off. Wouldn t 
it be a swine if the Board decided to trans 
fer him now? They could do that until 
o-ne got on to the grading list. 

At his parents home in the city the 
former social life recovered some of its 
sway. He was becoming more balanced 
about Gertrude and thought perhaps this 
break was a fortunate one until he came 
across a paragraph concerning her in a 
recent number of a woman s journal. The 
accompanying photo, of a smiling girl 
ruled out. the possibility of error. 

"Charming Gertrude Brunskill," the item 
said, "will be greatly missed by her large 
circle of friends when she leaves in mid- 
January to continue her singing studies 
at the London College of Music. At the 
moment Gertrude is holidaying on the 
farm of her step-brother, Mr. Samuel Brun 
skill, of Maroiti." 

Colin s world went black; he stared at 
the page in a numb horror. Had ever man 
suffered such deep-dyed treachery! 

Swiftly his mind stripped the plot to its 
essentials. How simple ! what a crazy, 
gullible fool he d beenl Brunskill had 
easily persuaded this sister of his to assist 
in taming the outlaw. It would keep her 
amused for those dull country days. As 
the family had been in Maroiti only a 
year it was feasible that outsiders hadn t 
been told of the city relative with operatic 
ambitions; it could have been a perfectly 
water-tight little scheme. 

She d be gone, of course, when he re 
turned at the beginning of February. 
Brunskill thought he d save his face: carry 
on like a good boy. Well, he wouldn t 
no, he d tear the place apart slam the lot 
of them every chance he got. The Board 
could transfer him or sack him as quick 
as it liked. 

A cry from his mother downstairs 
"Colin whatever are you doing?" awoke 
him to the fact that his blitz had already 
started. Articles and books from his 
dressing-table were strewn about the bed 
room floor. 

Colin s blood had cooled to calculating 
enmity before February arrived. He had 
written to his Maroiti host stating that 
he intended to restore Wesnington as his 
headquarters, though not from any dis 
satisfaction with conditions in that house. 

A puzzling circumstance met him at 
Maroiti. On the first afternoon of school, 
as he returned to Wesnington and drove 
down the main street, he could have sworn 
he saw Gertrude Brunskill gazing into a 
shop window. Next day he talked to one 
of the committee parents whom he met on 
the road during his lunch-hour stroll, and 
a chance remark enabled him to confirm 
that Gertrude was still at her brother s 
farm. 

Nothing to it probably: merely a delay 



in the sailing date due to wharf trouble. 
However, there was a secret decision to 
postpone his counter attack. Brunskill 
soon showed up with plans for the new 
year. Although he must have known of 
Colin s nightly retreat to Wesnington he 
made no comment. 

"Thanks, but I ll have to travel to Auck 
land on Saturday to see a sick friend in 
hospital," Colin fibbed when the chairman 
issued an invitation for a shooting stay at 
his home. 

After he d stalled on another similar 
invitation Brunskill seemed to depart in a 
huff. For a further week the educational 
situation in Maroiti could only be regarded 
as a very uneasy truce. 

Then, as he accelerated in his shabby 
two-seater from the school one afternoon. 
Colin was intrigued to see a woman s form 
on the lonely stretch of road ahead. He 
was late getting away and the children 
had all disappeared. The woman was walk 
ing in the same direction. She wore a long 
dark coat, the day being overcast and 
gloomy. 

Colin s heart began to race as he got 
close and thought be recognised the shape. 
Yes, it must be her. He slowed and swung 
out so as not to force her from the narrow 
strip of metal. 

She glanced sideways questioningly as he 
drew opposite. One never passed a pedes 
trian ou the roads in these parts: surely 
that was excuse enough. He shut off the 
gas and applied the foot-brake gently, wait 
ing in a ferment for her to catch up. The 
engine coughed to silence just as she 
arrived at the wheel side, an uncertain 
vision of wind-blown beauty. 

"Hullo," she chuckled softly, "we haven t 
seen much of you since you got back." 

Colin was no fencer. He said gruffly and 
searchingly: "I thought you d be gone to 
London. ... I saw it in the Globe a 
piece about vour singing and your holi 
day!" 

A flush spread over Gertrude s face; her 
appealing eyes wavered from his. 

"Yes, that was how it began," she said 
slowly and cryptically at last, gazing dis 
tantly up the road. "But now it s all 
changed. I don t want I hope I ll never 
never have to go." Her eyes came 
back at the end with an unbelievable shy 
tremor. 

Colin s eyes had been rounding in amaze 
ment; a -man s delirium pounded in his 
veins. With a tensing movement and a 
hand automatically on the door handle, he 
said wildly: "You mean ?" 

The queer, hesitant nod of the girl jerked 
him violently out of the car. "Oh, dear 
Gertrude," were the only words he breathed 
before his arms crushed her to him and 
their lips met in a first long kiss of be 
trothal. . . . 

A hundred yards away in a paddock one 
of his alarmed pupils started sprinting for 
home with the astounding news. 



NEW YEAR DRINKS 

[From page 28.] 

again to boiling point and allow to simmer 
round the edge. Skim carefully. When 
cold, strain through a hair sieve or muslin. 
Add soda-water to taste. 



The Anna Neagle and Michael Wilding 
series of London life pictures are being 
temporarily abandoned. "Maytime in May- 
fair" is the last of the Mohicians. Person 
ally we think it a pity, but the wiseheads 
have decided that Michael and Anna should 
go their separate ways for the time being. 
They were such clean light romances, with 
just that little dash of fairyland that 
made them so enjoyable. A break for a 
time should make their return more zest- 
fnl. There are still plenty of alliterative 
subjects in London and its environs. 



Pineapple Frisky. 

Take 1 cupful sugar, 1 pint cold water, 
1 Ib. tin grated pineapple, 1 orange, 3 
lemons, 2 bottles ginger ale. 

Boil sugar and water together for 10 
minutes. Add pineapjjle and the juice of 
orange and lemons. Strain, cool, and add 
chipped ice. Pour in ginger ale and serve. 

Fruit Nectar. 

Take 1 quart water, 2 cupsful grapefruit, 
juice 4 oranges, 2 cupsful sugar, juice 4 
lemons, 1 egg-white. 

Mix together the water and sugar. Heat 
to boiling point, then boil slowly for 10 
minutes. Cool, add grapefruit (cut into 
small pieces), lemon and orange juice. 
Freeze to a mash. Add stiffly-whipped egg- 
white, then chill for 3 hours, and use. 

Orange Squash. 

Take 3 oranges, 1 lemon, 3 tablespoons- 
ful sugar, 1 pint cold water. 

Cut the oranges in half and prepare two 
or three thin slices for garnishing. Squeeze 
the juice from the oranges and lemons, put 
into a jug and add the sugar. Allow it to 
stand for 30 minutes to dissolve the sugar. 
Add the cold water, garnish with slices of 
orange, and serve very cold. 

Chocolate Syrnp. 

Five squares unsweetened chocolate, 1 
cupful sugar, 1 cupful hot water, few grains 
salt, 2 egg yolks. 

Melt chocolate over hot water. Cool to 
lukewarm. Add sugar and salt to water 
and stir until sugar is dissolved. Cool. 
Add sugar syrup to slightly beaten egg 
yolks, a little at a time, beating well after 
each addition; add chocolate in the same 
way. Continue beating 1 minute or until 
slightly thickened. Syrup will keep in 
refrigerator for several days if placed in a 
tightly covered jar; it becomes thick when 
chilled. 

Party Punch. 

Cook 1 quart of berries in 3 pints of 
water; strain through a cloth and return 
the liquid to the fire with 2 cupsful of 
sugar; cook 5 minutes, then chill. Add 1 
cupful of orange juice, 1 cupful of pine 
apple juice and cupful of lemon juice. 
If not sweet enough, add a little powdered 
sugar; pour over ice cubes, half filling the 
glasses, and fill with ginger ale or charged 
wtfter. Add maraschino cherries sliced 
cross-wise, and bits of tinned pineapple. 

Cherry Cup. 

Take the juice of a pint of stew*" 
cherries, add more sugar if desired, ann 
the juice of 2 or 3 lemons and 1 orange. 
Cover and leave stand for several hours. 
Then strain and add a small bottle of red 
wine. Use with soda water as required. 

Chocolate Syrup. 

One cupful cocoa or 4 squares of choco 
late, 2 cupsful sugar, 2 eupsful boiling 
water, dash salt and 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
Cook all ingredients except vanilla for f> 
minutes. Cool, add vanilla. 

Currantade. 

Crush 1 quart of currants and 1 pint of 
raspberries or berries in season. Add a 
[Turn to page 34."] 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 



33 




Ny on Monofilameni 

JCQ u manufactured in ENGLAND by 
IMPER.AL CHEfliCAl INDUSTRIES 

RIO-P 



34 



Australian Home Journal, January 2, 1950 




An amusing toy for a young child and 
one which ia fun to make, is this merry 
jester. 

You will need a small quantity of flesh- 
coloured lingerie silk to make the head; 
about i yard each of ij-inch red and blue 
ribbon; about \ yard of $-ineh yellow rib 
bon; 7 inches of 2 to 24-inch red ribbon 
for cap; 1 yard of $-inch green ribbon; 5 
email ji"gle 
bells and one 
slightly larger 
one; 1 corset 
eteel, paper- 
covered, for 
handle; a little 
wool or wad 
ding for stuf 
fing. 




Fold your silk 
in half and pin 
to prevent slip 
ping. 

Cut pattern of 
head from thin 
cardboard and 
trace outline on 
silk. Stitch on mach 
ine, leaving 1 inch 
unsown at back of 
head. Now cut out, leaving a margin of 
rather less than J inch ali around. 

Turn inside out and very gently coax 
nose, mouth and chin into shape." Now 
commence stuffing: Use small pieces of 
teased out stuffing and work well down 
Into nose. Then stuff the chin. Then pro 
ceed to stuff the entire head. Build out 
the cheeks as you work. When the whole 
head is packed firmly, leave it on one sid<; 
while you make the handle. 

Bond the corset steel into shape, making 



a loop at one end and allowing 3 inches to 
project at the other end. 

Bind the handle with greeu ribbon. If 
you put a little Tarzan s Grip on the end 
of the steel you will find it much easier to 
commence the winding. Keep the loop bent 
as you work and when within 1 inch of 
where the end meets the handle, bind the 
two together very tightly as you work up 
wards. Fasten ribbon at top with a little 
glue a?id a few stitches. 

Now push handle through opening in 
head and wark up through stuffing until it 
nearly reaches the top of the head. Sew 
up opening and secure handle by stitching 
through the ribbon. With rouge, tint 
cheeks, nose and chin. Using a Biro 
pen, colour eyes blue, mouth red, eye 
brows and eyelashes black. Make 
hair by sewing little "tufts" of yel 
low wool in place; then tease out. 

Make cap from the wide red rib 
bon. Fold ribbon in half and top- 



catUjvrvvY\a oSJL 



sew the edges together. Then shape other 
side to make a dunce s cap. Cut away 
superfluous ribbon, leaving small turning. 

Turn cap inside out. Boll lower edge 
over twice on right side, and crease to 
keep in shape. Sew bell to point of cap. 
Sew cap to head, hiding stitches under the 
fold. Add three little ostrich feathers, if 
desired. 

Now point one end of the narrow red 
ribbon and. sew a tiny bell to the point. 
Make four more streamers of slightly 
varying lengths, one each of blue anil 
green, and two of yellow. Sew to top of 
handle where it joins the head. Trim with 
ribbon bow, as illustrated. 

The Eight Word. 

Badio programmes sometimes produce 
the _ unexpected very pleasantly. I like, 
for instance, the twist given to a" discussion 
on women s styles in ^n American quiz 
show. An elderly man was one of the 
contestants. He "was asked: "I suppose 
you are old enoug